Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Getting ready to order a 2018 Rav4 Limited AWS. What is the gas mileage like of the hybrid vs. the regular? Is it worth it? I have a 2013 right now and get about 24 mpg. What are you getting with your hybrids?
 

·
Registered
RAV4 HV Limited, Prius Prime Advanced
Joined
·
2,096 Posts
These numbers are widely available. The EPA figures are pretty close to actual.
In town the HV can double the MPG of the gas model, on the freeway they are about the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Getting ready to order a 2018 Rav4 Limited AWS. What is the gas mileage like of the hybrid vs. the regular? Is it worth it? I have a 2013 right now and get about 24 mpg. What are you getting with your hybrids?
A little over 56,000 miles on my 2016 and averaging 35.4 mpg. I did not start using fuelly until after 5000+ miles so it might actually be higher. Also, you get the best gas mileage in warmer weather I average over 37 mpg during the summer and 33+ in winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Thanks for the info!!

What is fuelly?
It is a site a lot of us use to track actual gas mileage. Everybody drives differently though so we all have different results but for the most part I've changed my driving style to get better miles per gallons.:smile
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
818 Posts
It really depends on your driving style and type of road (hwy vs local).
In my case, a 2017 RAV4 Hybrid...
For 90 mile round trip commute with local (10%) plus highway (90%), est 38mpg.
For 40 mile round trip commute with local (70%) plus highway (30%), est 42mpg.
Local streets short distance driving <5 miles one way, est 35mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
I think EPA numbers and fuelly numbers are accurate. It says 7,3L/100km (32.4 MPG) for Hybryd 2016 and 2017 :

Toyota RAV4 MPG - Actual MPG from 288 Toyota RAV4 owners

You can see my MPG in my signature. Of course you can do worse, but you can really do better because in my case, I always have a roof rack on the top (bikes and/or Thule box), I do a lot of highway at 110 km/h, and my main commute has a lot of hills. It's gonna be worse this winter in my case.

My friend has a RAV4 2015 (gas only) and he does about 10L/100 (24 MPG) overall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Getting ready to order a 2018 Rav4 Limited AWS. What is the gas mileage like of the hybrid vs. the regular? Is it worth it? I have a 2013 right now and get about 24 mpg. What are you getting with your hybrids?
Since I have a RAV4 hybrid, I am biased and from sales data I don't understand why so many more want the non-hybrid (of course I can understand if all you can only afford/want a RAV4 FWD or the slightly less storage space in the hybrid was an issue). I would flip the question you asked and say why would you want an inferior vehicle (regular RAV4)?

Imagine it was 2013 and a 4cyl Rav4 cost more than a V6 Rav4 and the V6 also got better mileage, would anyone really want the 4cyl Rav4? That is basically the proposition in considering total cost of a regular Rav4 vs hybrid Rav4.

The following are the reasons I would say the hybrid makes more sense than the non-hybrid:
-Since you are moving from a 2013 to a 2018, that is 5 years and lets say it is your usual habit of changing every 5 years. If you get the Hybrid model yes it will cost more upfront than the non-hybrid, but in 5yrs when you sell/trade in, it will also be worth more than the non-hybrid. Savings in gas cost alone will VERY likely results in lower cost of ownership.
-Hybrid rav4 will also save your brakes
-Hybrid rav4 drives better, has more power & faster acceleration
-Hybrid rav4 has higher towing limit
-Hybrid rav4 has more ground clearance

Plus I also expect the electronic AWD of the hybrid to be superior in real world use than the non-hybrid AWD. Yes the rear electric motor "only" has 67hp, but remember that an electric motor basically already has full power at low rpm and you also have the 141hp front electric. Full power of the regular AWD happens at 6000rpm, and power would be much much lower at lower rpm slippery/low traction conditions. You would be foolish to be flooring it at 6000 rpm in a slippery situation to try to extract all the power of the non-hybrid.

My mileage is in my fuelly signature. I consider my mileage absolutely outstanding. In all my previous non-hybrid vehicles I get much worse than their EPA city rating. My type of driving is challenging to get good mileage, 90% city, stop and go, and many short trips (work is 6.5km away and most of my other errands eg. grocery, are even less than that). So if I drove a non-hybrid RAV4 AWD I would likely get less than 20mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Since I have a RAV4 hybrid, I am biased and from sales data I don't understand why so many more want the non-hybrid (of course I can understand if all you can only afford/want a RAV4 FWD or the slightly less storage space in the hybrid was an issue). I would flip the question you asked and say why would you want an inferior vehicle (regular RAV4)?

Imagine it was 2013 and a 4cyl Rav4 cost more than a V6 Rav4 and the V6 also got better mileage, would anyone really want the 4cyl Rav4? That is basically the proposition in considering total cost of a regular Rav4 vs hybrid Rav4.

The following are the reasons I would say the hybrid makes more sense than the non-hybrid:
-Since you are moving from a 2013 to a 2018, that is 5 years and lets say it is your usual habit of changing every 5 years. If you get the Hybrid model yes it will cost more upfront than the non-hybrid, but in 5yrs when you sell/trade in, it will also be worth more than the non-hybrid. Savings in gas cost alone will VERY likely results in lower cost of ownership.
-Hybrid rav4 will also save your brakes
-Hybrid rav4 drives better, has more power & faster acceleration
-Hybrid rav4 has higher towing limit
-Hybrid rav4 has more ground clearance

Plus I also expect the electronic AWD of the hybrid to be superior in real world use than the non-hybrid AWD. Yes the rear electric motor "only" has 67hp, but remember that an electric motor basically already has full power at low rpm and you also have the 141hp front electric. Full power of the regular AWD happens at 6000rpm, and power would be much much lower at lower rpm slippery/low traction conditions. You would be foolish to be flooring it at 6000 rpm in a slippery situation to try to extract all the power of the non-hybrid.

My mileage is in my fuelly signature. I consider my mileage absolutely outstanding. In all my previous non-hybrid vehicles I get much worse than their EPA city rating. My type of driving is challenging to get good mileage, 90% city, stop and go, and many short trips (work is 6.5km away and most of my other errands eg. grocery, are even less than that). So if I drove a non-hybrid RAV4 AWD I would likely get less than 20mpg.
While you make some valid points, some of them really don't apply. I work for Toyota so this is an associate lease. When my 2018 comes in I will just give back the 2013 and they will hand me the keys to my 2018, no money/trade in involved. All repairs are covered so the maintenance issues of regular vs. hybrid are a moot point. The car is not free though, I pay a monthly payment that comes out of my paycheck.

My one concern, and this may not seem that important....but you cannot get the remote start on the hybrid. I have that on my 2013 and really like it. It's nice to get into a warm car when it's cold out. However, it would also be nice to save on the amount I spend on gas.....so???

Your 4th paragraph was a little over my head :frown
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Do you drive mostly highway or mostly local? They are rated the same on the highway. If most of your drive is highway you'll gain far less benefit than if you always drive around within a couple of miles of home. The $4000 or so premium will buy a lot of additional gasoline.

How do insurance rates compare? Any upcharge for all the extra hybrid components?

Any registration costs/incentives where you live?

I thought about the hybrid, having had a Prius for a while, but decided on the regular XLE.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Do you drive mostly highway or mostly local? They are rated the same on the highway. If most of your drive is highway you'll gain far less benefit than if you always drive around within a couple of miles of home. The $4000 or so premium will buy a lot of additional gasoline.

How do insurance rates compare? Any upcharge for all the extra hybrid components?

Any registration costs/incentives where you live?I thought about the hybrid, having had a Prius for a while, but decided on the regular XLE.
If you read my post #11 you will see that these things really don't apply regarding costs. But I do more highway driving than local, probably 70/30. I think I'm gonna go with the regular and get the remote start which is not available on the hybrid.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,120 Posts
The EPA ratings of the Hybrid are a bare minimum, Consumer Reports got 36mpg at 65mph on their 20 mile test loop which is 10 miles of highway traveled both ways using actual instrument measured fuel used. IIRC they got 26mpg city, but the gas model got 18mpg, comparable to others in the class, dunno what their city test is, but it's pretty harsh. I drove a '15 Ltd gas model for a year, the fuel economy on the highway(31mpg at best) was not comparable and the city fuel economy(23-24mpg at best) was hideous in comparison. I just finished another tank, 75 miles was offroad(old logging roads) climbing to about 4000' on Mt Adams, display showed 34mpg on the way home, so I decided to run the balance of the tank in sport mode and drive for fun instead of best fuel economy, I never use sport mode, always normal or eco, at fillup I still got 32.8 mpg. Driving in sport mode was a bit reminiscent of driving the 2006 V6 Rav4 I drove for many years, a lot more fun to drive in comparison to the '15 gas model.>:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Do you drive mostly highway or mostly local? They are rated the same on the highway. If most of your drive is highway you'll gain far less benefit than if you always drive around within a couple of miles of home. The $4000 or so premium will buy a lot of additional gasoline.

How do insurance rates compare? Any upcharge for all the extra hybrid components?

Any registration costs/incentives where you live?

I thought about the hybrid, having had a Prius for a while, but decided on the regular XLE.
I believe the original poster wants AWD, technically they said "AWS". So you can't say $4,000 buys a lot of gas. When you compare equivalent trims of AWD non-hybrid to AWD hybrid price, in Limited trim the price difference is only like $1,700. Even then it would be incorrect to say $1,700 buys a lot of gas, as that assumes that you drove both into the ground and both have resale value of zero. In reality rarely does anyone drive a car from new into the ground. At some point most people will trade it in or sell it. And If you leased it, you also don't pay for the full price difference in a lease, only the value of the car you used.

To keep true cost of ownership simple, assume you keep for 5 yrs and depreciation of both vehicles is 50%. This implies your capital cost difference of the Hybrid is only $850 more. Unless you are doing like 100% highway driving and/or don't drive much, you will likely be financially better off buying the Hybrid and that does not even take into account the fact that you would have enjoyed driving a better vehicle over those 5 years (i.e. more power, more torque, better for towing, more ground clearance, better AWD system).

To back up my above example if you look at Edmunds True Cost of Ownership (you can google this, includes depreciation, gas, maintenance, insurance, repairs, etc) over 5 years, Edmunds projects that it actually costs more to own a non-hybrid than the hybrid (assuming typical driver 15,000 miles/yr), using a 2017 RAV4 as they don't yet have 2018 data. To me that is a no brainer, Hybrid is cheaper to own AND you get a better driving vehicle. Using equivalent trims AWD Limited regular vs AWD Hybrid Limited, Total cost of ownership for the non-hybrid is projected at $46,080 vs $45,500 for the hybrid.

Now in the case of the original poster, remote starter was important so that is something intangible that is better with the regular Rav4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
I was in this same predicament and I was leaning toward the hybrid too as we have a Prius and like it a lot. The RAV4 wasn't going to be a main vehicle driven every day though so I ended up saving a large amount of money and buying a standard XLE. I was able to get a loaded XLE with a MSRP of just under $32k for $23,500 so that was many thousands less than a hybrid. I drive the RAV4 more in the winter months but it will most likely get driven around 5k miles a year. I own 7 cars so most of them get low miles driven each year. If a hybrid isn't driven regularly it's not as got for it to sit for a week or more between drives as the battery doesn't like it.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top