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Appoligies if this has already been discussed. I didn't seen anything in search. According to the specs page on the Toyota US webpage for the RAV4 hybrid, starting with June 2020 production the battery will switch from NiMH to Lithium chemistry.

The power output is listed as identical so it shouldn't be that that noticable. There is no indication of weight change.

We are currently in the market for a Hybrid but don't have a pressing need to replace our current vehicle. Just wondering what the thinking is if there is an advantage to waiting for the Lithium battery version that is just starting production or just go with the NiMH currently at the dealer? Thanks!
 

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Appoligies if this has already been discussed. I didn't seen anything in search. According to the specs page on the Toyota US webpage for the RAV4 hybrid, starting with June 2020 production the battery will switch from NiMH to Lithium chemistry.

The power output is listed as identical so it shouldn't be that that noticable. There is no indication of weight change.

We are currently in the market for a Hybrid but don't have a pressing need to replace our current vehicle. Just wondering what the thinking is if there is an advantage to waiting for the Lithium battery version that is just starting production or just go with the NiMH currently at the dealer? Thanks!
Glad I got the nickel battery.
Lithium is not good in cold weather without a means to keep the battery warm
 

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2919 Rav4 Hybrid Limited, Entune 3.0, Adaptive Headlights, Advanced Technology Package built June 20
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The next battery improvement is always just around the corner. But I wish I had a dime for every new and improved story. I can't predict the market either ....
 

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This is so weird.

They already have supply problems for the Prime batteries, this would only make things worse. NiMH works fine, and even has some advantages. So why change? Especially in the middle of a model year. I could maybe understand if the weight savings or battery capacity let them improve by 1 MPG, or if Lithium lets them boost the EV performance a bit ... but those are the sorts of improvements a company touts at the next model year. I just don't get it.
 

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^^^ Maybe this is why they have supply problems for the Prime batteries. They (will) sell a lot more non-Prime hybrids than Primes. What, 100 to 1?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Im wondering if it has to do with the popularity of the Hybrid. Follow me on this. What if Toyota planned on the lithium switch at the 2020 to 2021 MY changeover but demand for the hybrid exhausted the allotted supply of NiMH batteries. Do you end production on the hottest hybrid in your lineup or go with the battery supply intended for 2021 MY?

This doesn't seem like a long planned thing since it happened very late in the MY 2020 production run and how infrequently (outside of Tesla) there is a complete change in a major part during a model year.
 

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Depending where in North America you live will determine if your market gets Lithium or keeps Nickel metal.
Canada will remain Nickel Metal.
It still will be built with both. As some one already noted, Lithium doesn't really play well with northern climates.
 

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Appoligies if this has already been discussed. I didn't seen anything in search. According to the specs page on the Toyota US webpage for the RAV4 hybrid, starting with June 2020 production the battery will switch from NiMH to Lithium chemistry.

The power output is listed as identical so it shouldn't be that that noticable. There is no indication of weight change.

We are currently in the market for a Hybrid but don't have a pressing need to replace our current vehicle. Just wondering what the thinking is if there is an advantage to waiting for the Lithium battery version that is just starting production or just go with the NiMH currently at the dealer? Thanks!
I'm reading lithium starts with production models after June 2020. That means my June-built model has NiMH
 

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Well, my 2020 RAV 4 XSE Hybrid was just built in Georgetown, KY last Friday so i'll let you guys know what it has... we pick it up tomorrow.
 

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^^^ Cut the battery open with a hatchet. If it catches on fire and explodes, it's a Lithium Ion battery. Let us know how it goes.

Seriously, I don't know how you would know, other than looking for a LiON symbol somewhere on the battery pack.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well, my 2020 RAV 4 XSE Hybrid was just built in Georgetown, KY last Friday so i'll let you guys know what it has... we pick it up tomorrow.
That seems like an incredibly fast assembly line to delivery time. It may have left Georgetown on Friday but I would be very surprised that it rolled off the line on that day.
 

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This is so weird.

They already have supply problems for the Prime batteries, this would only make things worse. NiMH works fine, and even has some advantages. So why change? Especially in the middle of a model year. I could maybe understand if the weight savings or battery capacity let them improve by 1 MPG, or if Lithium lets them boost the EV performance a bit ... but those are the sorts of improvements a company touts at the next model year. I just don't get it.
I read a piece in Motortrend yesterday that explained that the predictions about the increasing popularity of hybrids, plug-in's and EV's fail to take into account the vast limitations on the availability of the natural resources needed to actually build the batteries.
 

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Is there a label I can check on the car? Not sure how else to tell the type of battery.
You could look on or around page 680 of the owners manual (Chapter 9 - Vehicle Specs). It will have the battery info for your RAV.
 

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That seems like an incredibly fast assembly line to delivery time. It may have left Georgetown on Friday but I would be very surprised that it rolled off the line on that day.
I have a 2020 XSE from Woodstock built on March 11, picked it up from the dealer on March 20. Of course I had to wait 6+ months for that to happen. 🤣
 

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Appoligies if this has already been discussed. I didn't seen anything in search. According to the specs page on the Toyota US webpage for the RAV4 hybrid, starting with June 2020 production the battery will switch from NiMH to Lithium chemistry.

The power output is listed as identical so it shouldn't be that that noticable. There is no indication of weight change.

We are currently in the market for a Hybrid but don't have a pressing need to replace our current vehicle. Just wondering what the thinking is if there is an advantage to waiting for the Lithium battery version that is just starting production or just go with the NiMH currently at the dealer? Thanks!
LI Ion batteries are less tolerant of low temperatures than NiMH. I can attest to that. My Li Ion Prius clearly suffers performance loss in 0 degree or lower weather until it is fully warmed up. Living in a near arctic environment, I for one and glad my RAV hv has an NiMH battery.
 
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