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Hello I am considering replacing my CRV with a Rav4. I have been a Honda guy for years but my 2014 has had a few issues with brakes and rear bearings.

Owning a Hybrid has always interested me but we drive mostly on rural highways. Our speed is usually 98 kph about 60 mph or so. I have heard that Hybrids don't offer the fuel savings on the highway to make them worth while. How would the Hybrid Rav do at this speed. Would it be worth the extra initial cost?
Thanks
 

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The hybrid gets better highway fuel economy than the gas version, but the difference isn't nearly as staggering. The EPA estimates 38 vs 35 for the FWD and 33 for the AWD.

Google tells me the average fuel price in Canada is $1.344/L. At that price, you save $100 CAD after 14,000 km compared to the FWD model, and after 8,000 km compared to the AWD model. For comparison, it only takes 2500-2800 km in the city to save that much money). I don't think you'll ever recuperate the cost difference over the FWD if you only drive highway. Compared to the AWD, it's possible, but only if you own the car for a long time.
 

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The hybrid won't save you much vs a standard RAV4 if you do mostly rural highway. The hybrid is quicker than the regular car, that may matter more for your driving. It is a quieter drive and smoother drive, with the electric motors taking a load off the gas engine.
If you can tell, I really like our Hybrid Limited.
 

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I’ll be the outlier.

In warmer weather I was easily getting 40+ MPG doing 55-60 on rural highways. Right now it’s around 35-37 MPG.

Conversely, in city-only driving I’m struggling to hit 30 MPG now. To get the tank average back up to 35+ I have to go for a long rural drive.

“Your Mileage May Vary” :)
 

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Hello I am considering replacing my CRV with a Rav4. I have been a Honda guy for years but my 2014 has had a few issues with brakes and rear bearings.

Owning a Hybrid has always interested me but we drive mostly on rural highways. Our speed is usually 98 kph about 60 mph or so. I have heard that Hybrids don't offer the fuel savings on the highway to make them worth while. How would the Hybrid Rav do at this speed. Would it be worth the extra initial cost?
Thanks
That’s where we use ours! 2019 XSE 11,000 miles and really happy with it! About 70/30 rural/town, and about 800 miles have been on the freeway..Avg MPG was near 40 until cold weather hit now it’s about 32, with temps below zero! When the winter fuel mix arrived and cooler weather 20-40 above avg was about 35. At 60MPH you should do better than us..
 

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I just picked up my Rav4 Limited Hybrid last Saturday. I will be driving about 55,000 miles per year for work with most being highway miles. I have already put on about 750 miles in the last 3 days. The first tank wasn't full when I picked it up and did a lot of idling in temps around 10 degrees. I go about 33 MPG. The current tank the temp has been in the upper 30's and according to the computer I am about 37 MPG. We'll see what it really is when I fill up next. The gas version I doubt will do that well. I am sure as I get some more miles on and the temp warm the MPG will rise significantly and will be averaging about 8 to 10 more MPG than the gas version.
 

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eh... if you are putting 55k miles for work why not go for a Prius (even with AWD), gas saving will be astronomical with such high mileage
 

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Owning a Hybrid has always interested me but we drive mostly on rural highways. Our speed is usually 98 kph about 60 mph or so. I have heard that Hybrids don't offer the fuel savings on the highway to make them worth while. How would the Hybrid Rav do at this speed. Would it be worth the extra initial cost?
Thanks
Don't fall into the common trap of assuming that "saving gas/money" is the main advantage of the HV models. Its not, and it'll never justify the purchase. Yes you'll save some gas, but how much depends on MANY variables. The hybrid system is more reliable / lasts longer and carries a very generous warranty. The list of advantages goes on: far less emissions, lots of sexy technology to play with, less upkeep, an effective AWD system that doesn't consume gas, and on and on.
 

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I moved to the Rav4 hybrid from a Camry XSE. The Camry was great but I carry many materials when working and the Camry just didn't have enough room to carry what I need easily and a Prius would never have enough room. I travel in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and South Dakota and the all wheel drive is a huge plus. The Rav4 seems to fill my needs perfectly.
 

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Don't fall into the common trap of assuming that "saving gas/money" is the main advantage of the HV models. Its not, and it'll never justify the purchase. Yes you'll save some gas, but how much depends on MANY variables. The hybrid system is more reliable / lasts longer and carries a very generous warranty. The list of advantages goes on: far less emissions, lots of sexy technology to play with, less upkeep, an effective AWD system that doesn't consume gas, and on and on.
What evidence do you have that the hybrid is more reliable? The only million mile Toyotas I'm aware of are gas powered tundras and tacomad
 

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There is almost as much room in a Prius as a Rav4. That being said, the areas where you drive could benefit from more ground clearance to tackle show. Another benefit of the Rav4 over the Prius is the newer design and technology. The Prius is mid-cycle now and the prototype for the next model has just been released.


I moved to the Rav4 hybrid from a Camry XSE. The Camry was great but I carry many materials when working and the Camry just didn't have enough room to carry what I need easily and a Prius would never have enough room. I travel in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and South Dakota and the all wheel drive is a huge plus. The Rav4 seems to fill my needs perfectly.
 

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Thanks for all the thoughts.

As for reliability I have heard (no documentation) of many Prius taxis in Vancouver with over a million kms on them!
The Prius AWD would be another option we really don't use the extra space in our present CRV that often, (our other "car" is a F 150 Crew Cab).
We do like the extra height of the Rav for exit and entry.
 

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There is almost as much room in a Prius as a Rav4. That being said, the areas where you drive could benefit from more ground clearance to tackle show. Another benefit of the Rav4 over the Prius is the newer design and technology. The Prius is mid-cycle now and the prototype for the next model has just been released.

I find the back seat of the prius is significantly more cramped feeling than the rav4. (I'm 6 foot)

The rav also has at least 10 cubic feet of cargo. Its significantly larger or at least it feels that way. The rear passenger area feels tight and cramped compared to the rav4
 

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While driving on the highway at 60mph, I'm getting around 38-40mpg and it's the middle of winter (snowy climate). I've only had it for a couple of months and am only on the 2nd tank of gas but I'm very happy with the efficiency.
 

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60 mph is really a sweet spot for the ICE - its not working at all. So I suppose it depends on how many cross roads you hit, but I doubt the mileage would be all that much different. Also, there is no statistical evidence one is more reliable than the other - there likely pretty close to the same - but since no one has 300,000 miles yet stay tuned.

Decide what you want to spend, then go drive one of each that fits your budget, and pick the one you enjoy the most.

Best of luck - I am sure it will be a good fit either way.
 

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We love the Hybird. During warm weather, the RAV4 consistently exceeded the estimated MPG, often received 44 mpg. On a long road trip, we received 39 mpg. Since the cold weather set in, our MPG has declined which is customary, We are currently receiving between 35 and 38 mpg which is a significant drop, but probably consistent percentage wise with past experience whit automobiles that averaged 22mpg during warm weather dropping to 18mpg.
 

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Not sure how the models might work differently in Canada, but here in the US, the gas-powered Limited and Adventure AWD models have "torque vectoring AWD." And, from what I can tell, quite a lot more rubber on the pavement. Larger wheels / wider tires / etc. Not sure what you're talking about in terms of "rural highways," but if you're going through curves and hills, you will notice a substantial difference for the better when you switch into Sport mode on the highway -- you can change the display to see which wheels are getting power, and see how the rear wheels will get power to help push you up hills, and the outboard wheel will get power as you go around curves. I have watched a video wherein the reviewers talked about the hybrid "being on tiptoes" in curvy conditions; all I can say is that I have definitely felt that my Limited AWD feels far more "planted" through the mountain twisties when I've switched into Sport mode. Being retired, I do quite a lot of driving on the open highways, and absolutely wouldn't trade away the feeling from the torque vectoring AWD for a few extra MPG. I have often "forgotten to switch into Sport mode" (what I have described here only works in Sport mode) when getting into the mountains, and then switched over, and the difference is very easy to feel.

So, if "rural highways" is just straight, flat roads, that wouldn't make much of a difference. But if you're driving in the "mountain twisties" quite a bit, you might seriously consider getting a model with torque vectoring AWD.
 

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Hello I am considering replacing my CRV with a Rav4. I have been a Honda guy for years but my 2014 has had a few issues with brakes and rear bearings.

Owning a Hybrid has always interested me but we drive mostly on rural highways. Our speed is usually 98 kph about 60 mph or so. I have heard that Hybrids don't offer the fuel savings on the highway to make them worth while. How would the Hybrid Rav do at this speed. Would it be worth the extra initial cost?
Thanks
We have a 2019 rav4 limited and love it except for annoying rear wheel disconnect noise. This dusconnect feature js on the limited and adventure models only. If you do not get the hybred suggest you consider the XLE which does not have dynamic torque. Ectoring AWD with rear disconnect. See forum "2019 rav4 rear whhel clunking noise" by jinglebells
 
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