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Not sure how the models might work differently in Canada, but here in the US, the gas-powered Limited and Adventure AWD models have "torque vectoring AWD." And, from what I can tell, quite a lot more rubber on the pavement. Larger wheels / wider tires / etc. Not sure what you're talking about in terms of "rural highways," but if you're going through curves and hills, you will notice a substantial difference for the better when you switch into Sport mode on the highway -- you can change the display to see which wheels are getting power, and see how the rear wheels will get power to help push you up hills, and the outboard wheel will get power as you go around curves. I have watched a video wherein the reviewers talked about the hybrid "being on tiptoes" in curvy conditions; all I can say is that I have definitely felt that my Limited AWD feels far more "planted" through the mountain twisties when I've switched into Sport mode. Being retired, I do quite a lot of driving on the open highways, and absolutely wouldn't trade away the feeling from the torque vectoring AWD for a few extra MPG. I have often "forgotten to switch into Sport mode" (what I have described here only works in Sport mode) when getting into the mountains, and then switched over, and the difference is very easy to feel.

So, if "rural highways" is just straight, flat roads, that wouldn't make much of a difference. But if you're driving in the "mountain twisties" quite a bit, you might seriously consider getting a model with torque vectoring AWD.
Re the annoying clunk from the dynamic torque vectoring rear eheel disconnect one should be aware this disconnect only hsppens in normal and eco modes, not in sport mode. So if you do not drive in normal or eco mode and stay in sport mode sll the time the resr wheel disconnect noise is eliminated. So you get quiter vehicle but you give seay advantage of better fuel economy and you are driving with more stress on engine all the time i.e. Longer shift points and higher rpm's for longer intervals. Agree that dynamic torque vectoring gives you a "safer" ride and better control
 

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This is a good example of "the problem" or whatever you want to call it. Some people have talked about a "clunk." I haven't heard anything like a "clunk" with mine -- if driving without any ventilation fan running or audio playing, you can barely hear the "disconnect" going on underneath the car, but, at least in my case, it absolutely cannot be considered anything beyond what you would expect "mechanical clutches" and such doing their jobs. What is clearly noticeable is what I have described -- the "groan" when going through 20 - 24 MPH. Or, as I prefer to call it, a "mooing" sound. Still, it sounds like a mechanical shaft spinning at a specific RPM, and I just can't turn "a mechanical mechanism making a mechanical noise" into the kind of armageddon that other people have turned it into. Toyota has released a TSB about the "groan," and perhaps that's evidence that newly-built vehicles won't have the issue. Personally, I'll wait quite a bit longer before going in for that TSB, to see if enough people report that it does indeed take care of the issue or not. Otherwise, I'm just not worried about it at all -- I'll keep an eye and an ear on it, and I'll keep checking to see if people are getting the TSB applied and if they're saying that doing so actually stopped the groaning. But there is no way on Earth I would be running around warning people to avoid any model that has torque vectoring AWD.
 

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This is a good example of "the problem" or whatever you want to call it. Some people have talked about a "clunk." I haven't heard anything like a "clunk" with mine -- if driving without any ventilation fan running or audio playing, you can barely hear the "disconnect" going on underneath the car, but, at least in my case, it absolutely cannot be considered anything beyond what you would expect "mechanical clutches" and such doing their jobs. What is clearly noticeable is what I have described -- the "groan" when going through 20 - 24 MPH. Or, as I prefer to call it, a "mooing" sound. Still, it sounds like a mechanical shaft spinning at a specific RPM, and I just can't turn "a mechanical mechanism making a mechanical noise" into the kind of armageddon that other people have turned it into. Toyota has released a TSB about the "groan," and perhaps that's evidence that newly-built vehicles won't have the issue. Personally, I'll wait quite a bit longer before going in for that TSB, to see if enough people report that it does indeed take care of the issue or not. Otherwise, I'm just not worried about it at all -- I'll keep an eye and an ear on it, and I'll keep checking to see if people are getting the TSB applied and if they're saying that doing so actually stopped the groaning. But there is no way on Earth I would be running around warning people to avoid any model that has torque vectoring AWD.
You may. E one of the lucky ones who have a quiet AWD rear disconnect. I envy you. CHEck out the toyota "tech tip" on the clunk noise. Note it is not a TSB but is rather a " tech tip". It specifically notes the noise problem and states that when mechanic diagnosis the problem they should "...compare it to a known good vehicle...". So all I want is a repair to bring my vehicle into compliance with a known good vehicle . Unless you are deaf, the rear wheel disconnect is very noticeable. And I am near deaf and wear hearing aids. I love the vehicle but hate the clunk
 

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This is a good example of "the problem" or whatever you want to call it. Some people have talked about a "clunk." I haven't heard anything like a "clunk" with mine -- if driving without any ventilation fan running or audio playing, you can barely hear the "disconnect" going on underneath the car, but, at least in my case, it absolutely cannot be considered anything beyond what you would expect "mechanical clutches" and such doing their jobs. What is clearly noticeable is what I have described -- the "groan" when going through 20 - 24 MPH. Or, as I prefer to call it, a "mooing" sound. Still, it sounds like a mechanical shaft spinning at a specific RPM, and I just can't turn "a mechanical mechanism making a mechanical noise" into the kind of armageddon that other people have turned it into. Toyota has released a TSB about the "groan," and perhaps that's evidence that newly-built vehicles won't have the issue. Personally, I'll wait quite a bit longer before going in for that TSB, to see if enough people report that it does indeed take care of the issue or not. Otherwise, I'm just not worried about it at all -- I'll keep an eye and an ear on it, and I'll keep checking to see if people are getting the TSB applied and if they're saying that doing so actually stopped the groaning. But there is no way on Earth I would be running around warning people to avoid any model that has torque vectoring AWD.
re the "groan " noise, I do not have it. But in dealing with Toyota service mgrs. at multiple dealerships they say that replacement of the electromechanical clutch assembly in the transfer case should eliminate the groan but they have cases where after such replacement the groan returns
 

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I’ll be the outlier.

In warmer weather I was easily getting 40+ MPG doing 55-60 on rural highways. Right now it’s around 35-37 MPG.

Conversely, in city-only driving I’m struggling to hit 30 MPG now. To get the tank average back up to 35+ I have to go for a long rural drive.

“Your Mileage May Vary” :)
Same here with a XLE hybrid !
 

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Unless you are deaf, the rear wheel disconnect is very noticeable. And I am near deaf and wear hearing aids. I love the vehicle but hate the clunk
Well, I'm certainly not hearing anything like that. Just the "groan" between 20 and 24 MPH. And I don't hear that very often, at that.
 

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re the "groan " noise, I do not have it. But in dealing with Toyota service mgrs. at multiple dealerships they say that replacement of the electromechanical clutch assembly in the transfer case should eliminate the groan but they have cases where after such replacement the groan returns
Yes, that's what I've gathered from the discussions here. Though, "the discussions" have been pretty hard to follow -- are people talking about the "groan" or the "clunk?" They often don't say, so, again, it's very hard to follow. And then at times the discussions veer off to other issues, such as the transmission thing, which appears to get fixed when folks go in and get that TSB applied.

I expect my attitude would be different if I had some monstrous "clunk" sound, but the "groan" just doesn't give me any impression that my vehicle is in imminent danger of falling apart or wearing out prematurely. And, indeed, with the state of the "groan" repair results, I'm more than happy to sit tight and see what happens over quite a bit more time.
 

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Re the annoying clunk from the dynamic torque vectoring rear eheel disconnect one should be aware this disconnect only hsppens in normal and eco modes, not in sport mode. So if you do not drive in normal or eco mode and stay in sport mode sll the time the resr wheel disconnect noise is eliminated. So you get quiter vehicle but you give seay advantage of better fuel economy and you are driving with more stress on engine all the time i.e. Longer shift points and higher rpm's for longer intervals. Agree that dynamic torque vectoring gives you a "safer" ride and better control
Hybrid....doesn’t have a drive line to the rear.
 

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Well, I'm certainly not hearing anything like that. Just the "groan" between 20 and 24 MPH. And I don't hear that very often, at that.
Good for you ! You do not have the clunk problem. If you had it you would know it. Not only is it audible with windows open and radio on but you can also FEEL it in the floor. I wish I had your luck and had a normal operating limited. I love almost everything else bout the limited
 

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We have a 2019 rav4 limited and love it except for annoying rear wheel disconnect noise. This dusconnect feature js on the limited and adventure models only. If you do not get the hybred suggest you consider the XLE which does not have dynamic torque. Ectoring AWD with rear disconnect. See forum "2019 rav4 rear whhel clunking noise" by jinglebells

This was a characteristic of the ICE version of the Rav4. Not the hybrid. Which do you have?
 

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Here
 

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This was a characteristic of the ICE version of the Rav4. Not the hybrid. Which do you have?
We have the limited. The hybrid dies not have rear wheel dusconnect. My reply orjginally was to the person considering a hybred or gas powered. I suggested if they do not pick the hybred they may wish to avoid the limited and adventure which both have resr wheel didconnect
 

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At 50-60mph you'll get 38-41. If you use Ethanol Free gas you'll get 40+, especially using the "pulse and glide" technique. Using Eco climate and drive modes and using heated seats and reducing heater blower use will help winter driving mpg. For AWD SUV these are best mpg #'s in class with 219HP.
 

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What evidence do you have that the hybrid is more reliable? The only million mile Toyotas I'm aware of are gas powered tundras and tacomad
There is plenty of evidence if you look for it. Here some general observations on hybrids.

Besides nickels and dimes gas savings, there are many other more important reasons for a Toyota hybrid. For example: 1. The brakes just about never wear out, because they are not needed as much since the electric motors slow the car, Depending on how long you keep the car, you will save a bunch on no brake work. 2. All the accessories that usually are run off belts on the engine are run via electric motors except the water pump (No alternator to replace No power steering pump to replace No vacuum booster to replace).
The transmission never needs service and will run for the life of the car. There are less than 20 moving parts and of course there are no software updates.
The electric power steering does not use hydraulics. Instead, the electric motor directly moves the steering rack through gears under direction of the EPS computer which has sensors to detect your steering inputs. The motor which drives the steering is also an AC brushless permanent magnet motor which has no wear parts other than oil-bathed bearings (which usually outlast the car).
Here is a post from this forum that talks about maintenance 2017 Hybrid Limited Shocks and Struts
 

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Good post. FYI, the 2019 eliminated the water pump belt, now the water pump is electric. Another advantage is a hybrid can idle for days on a few gallons of gas. Its just about as efficient as an inverter generator.

There is plenty of evidence if you look for it. Here some general observations on hybrids.

Besides nickels and dimes gas savings, there are many other more important reasons for a Toyota hybrid. For example: 1. The brakes just about never wear out, because they are not needed as much since the electric motors slow the car, Depending on how long you keep the car, you will save a bunch on no brake work. 2. All the accessories that usually are run off belts on the engine are run via electric motors except the water pump (No alternator to replace No power steering pump to replace No vacuum booster to replace).
The transmission never needs service and will run for the life of the car. There are less than 20 moving parts and of course there are no software updates.
The electric power steering does not use hydraulics. Instead, the electric motor directly moves the steering rack through gears under direction of the EPS computer which has sensors to detect your steering inputs. The motor which drives the steering is also an AC brushless permanent magnet motor which has no wear parts other than oil-bathed bearings (which usually outlast the car).
Here is a post from this forum that talks about maintenance 2017 Hybrid Limited Shocks and Struts
 

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^^^^ That guy with the 2017 is interesting. He puts hundreds of thousand of miles on his cars. BTW, he recommends the Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus tires for thread life. I'll have to keep them in mind when I change tires on my 2017 RAV4h.

Read the tirerack higher milage comments on that tire. They are amazing.
 

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Good points above about the advantages of the hybrid. Those aspects pushed me to buy a 2020 a few months ago. Love the car.
I drive a lot of miles under similar conditions and if you can afford another 10min for your drive, slow down. Keeping the speed down to 55 mph or 90 mph, you can save a lot of fuel. plus its more interesting to see how good you can do.
If you wanted AWD regardless, I think the cost impact is low.
 

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There is plenty of evidence if you look for it. Here some general observations on hybrids.

Besides nickels and dimes gas savings, there are many other more important reasons for a Toyota hybrid. For example: 1. The brakes just about never wear out, because they are not needed as much since the electric motors slow the car, Depending on how long you keep the car, you will save a bunch on no brake work. 2. All the accessories that usually are run off belts on the engine are run via electric motors except the water pump (No alternator to replace No power steering pump to replace No vacuum booster to replace).
The transmission never needs service and will run for the life of the car. There are less than 20 moving parts and of course there are no software updates.
The electric power steering does not use hydraulics. Instead, the electric motor directly moves the steering rack through gears under direction of the EPS computer which has sensors to detect your steering inputs. The motor which drives the steering is also an AC brushless permanent magnet motor which has no wear parts other than oil-bathed bearings (which usually outlast the car).
Here is a post from this forum that talks about maintenance 2017 Hybrid Limited Shocks and Struts
Good comments, except the Gen 5 ICE RAV4 has most of these features anyway. The power steering is fly by wire and all electric, the water pump is electric. The only thing run by the engine anymore are the alternator and A/C compressor. Alternators aren't much more than a electric motor anyway, and my last 3 cars were a Jeep, a Ford and a Nissan and all three got to 200,000 without any water pump or alternator issues anyway. Most of those failures are a thing of the past.

The transmissions are different. Your trading a transmission for a couple electric motors, a battery, and some very complex electronics.

Nonetheless, vehicles are generally very reliable these days anyway. Failures are usually the results of quality issues during assembly or inferior piece parts - not design - and you can have those failures on either a ICE or Hybrid. Longevity of either is most likely going to be very similar at this point - both proven technologies.
 

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Good comments, except the Gen 5 ICE RAV4 has most of these features anyway. The power steering is fly by wire and all electric, the water pump is electric. The only thing run by the engine anymore are the alternator and A/C compressor. Alternators aren't much more than a electric motor anyway, and my last 3 cars were a Jeep, a Ford and a Nissan and all three got to 200,000 without any water pump or alternator issues anyway. Most of those failures are a thing of the past.

The transmissions are different. Your trading a transmission for a couple electric motors, a battery, and some very complex electronics.

Nonetheless, vehicles are generally very reliable these days anyway. Failures are usually the results of quality issues during assembly or inferior piece parts - not design - and you can have those failures on either a ICE or Hybrid. Longevity of either is most likely going to be very similar at this point - both proven technologies.
There is no alternator on a hybrid and the compressor is run off of an electric motor.
 
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