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In your experience, is hypermiling pointless with this car?

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I've been hypermiling (or attempting to, anyways) since I got this car in November last year. I was averaging about 38 MPG.

Last month, I reset my MPG meter and decided to stop caring about fuel economy. Hypermiling is a lot of work and I'd rather not care, even if it costs me a few MPG. So I changed my driving habits to completely ignore fuel economy. I drive in sport mode full time, accelerate quickly, occasionally punch it going up hills just for fun, etc.

Interestingly, for the last ~2,500+ miles since I reset the fuel economy gauge, my average has been a personal best, by far. I think hypermiling in this car may be a pointless endeavor.

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"Hypermiling" isn't really an appropriate term to describe efficient driving of a hybrid. "Pulse and glide" is a more often used description. There's no question that using an efficient driving technique will improve MPG when you compare trip averages in identical conditions.
 

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"Hypermiling" isn't really an appropriate term to describe efficient driving of a hybrid. "Pulse and glide" is a more often used description.
Isn't "pulse and glide" essentially what a hybrid does on its own, runs the ICE when needed, then glides on battery while regenerating whenever possible?
 

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Isn't "pulse and glide" essentially what a hybrid does on its own, runs the ICE when needed, then glides on battery while regenerating whenever possible?
Depends on the driver. Some of the traditional "hypermiling" techniques used in gas cars will actually lower MPG in a hybrid. Take the same HV on the same trip driven by 3 different drivers and you will get 3 different trip averages.
 

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Isn't "pulse and glide" essentially what a hybrid does on its own, runs the ICE when needed, then glides on battery while regenerating whenever possible?
Yes and no. Toyota has gotten better at programming the hybrid system to take advantage of opportunities to "glide" but you can encourage that by taking your foot off the accelerator on mild down hills then returning to a light touch. Accelerating a bit before you take your foot off will result in a longer glide, hence the P&G.

So, I'll take the middle ground. I'm not sure it is pointless with this vehicle but it will likely only make a small difference. For most people, just drive it and enjoy this remarkable vehicle.

True hypermiling is more extreme and is best done on empty back roads to prove a point, not appropriate for every day driving.
 

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NC '19 Rav4 Hybrid Limited, Entune 3.0, Adaptive Headlights, Advanced Technology Package
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Some people seem to get spectacular mileage so they must be located in a place that facilitates better MPG and they must be super motivated to drive in a way that achieves super MPG. While I drive in eco mode 100% of the time, my right foot doesn't. For the size and utility of the vehicle, I'm not disappointed.
 

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Some of us (me), are obsessed with getting great MPG, and try to drive (most of the time) to get the max MPGs. I am never happy unless I get in the 50s or 60s on an in-town trip, or upper 40s on a highway trip. I frequently look in the rear-view mirror to make sure no one is behind me so that I can coast etc at will. I try to convince myself I am also saving the brake pads, and helping to save the environment.

It's a sickness. 🤪
 

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Posted on a different thread yesterday. Copied and pasted here. . . . .
Now that warm weather is here at last, I have just completed a tank that turned in 55.8 on the dash display, and 56.36 by the pump/odometer/calculator with my 2020 RAV4hv. This was pretty optimal driving, few stop lights, and speeds of 35, 45, and 55mph, no 65 or higher. Gentle acceleration, gentle deceleration, rock steady cruise, and off throttle as soon as possible when approaching stopped or slower traffic.
 

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In about six months of ownership and 5,000ish miles, my average Fuelly MPG is 37.6. I am a very conservative driver and I do try to maximize the hybrid technology while driving. I just don't get how some are reporting 55+ MPG. Are you drafting behind the cars and trucks ahead of you?
 

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In about six months of ownership and 5,000ish miles, my average Fuelly MPG is 37.6. I am a very conservative driver and I do try to maximize the hybrid technology while driving. I just don't get how some are reporting 55+ MPG. Are you drafting behind the cars and trucks ahead of you?
No drafting.
Just what I wrote. Driving that way works really good with my 16 Prius . .70-80 mpg. Maybe the thin air up here at 9100 feet?
 

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Ambient temperature makes a huge difference to the figures and the only driving technique which will get savings of the same order would be to drive slowly ( e.g. never more than 50 mph) and brake very gently. The car itself handles all the subtle stuff and it also gives you plenty of information about what its doing. Personally I try not to worry about it but through the winter I have been staying in ECO mode which still leaves full power available on demand.
 

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So, here are some facts.

As I have mentioned elsewhere, this is the 5th hybrid that I have owned: 2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid, 2010 Toyota Prius, 2016 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, 2017 Toyota RAV4h, and now 2020 Toyota RAV4h.

For all 5 cars, there have been people in the respective forums that could not reach the rated MPG, no matter what they tried. They would take it to the dealer to complain, try various hyper-miling techniques, etc, and be frustrated with the car.

For all 5 cars, there have been people that not only could (in nice weather) get the rated MPG, they could regularly do way better. And there would be a few people that could do phenomenally better.

I have gotten better than the rated MPG for all 5 cars. For the first 4, the MPGs got a little better as the engine broke in (maybe 15k-20k miles). For the 2020 RAV4h, I only have 1800 miles on it, so I don't know yet. For the Camry, I initially got less than the rated MPGs, until I learned how to drive for maximum MPGs, then, percentage-wise, got the largest amount more, so far, than the rated MPGs. For the Prius and the Sonata, I got just a tiny bit more than the rated MPGs.

For all 5 cars, the MPGs went down in the winter, and it was a struggle to get the rated MPGs, but I frequently could get at or close to it (I live in central NC).

For my 2017 Lexus ES (not a hybrid), I got about 10% better than the rated MPGs for both city and highway. I just could not help myself and drove it as if it was a hybrid.

Now, one opinion: Most people would NOT like how I drive, in order to achieve these results.
 

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Now, one opinion: Most people would NOT like how I drive, in order to achieve these results.
You mean other drivers are tailgating you and using unfriendly hand gestures to encourage you to drive "normally"?
 

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You mean other drivers are tailgating you and using unfriendly hand gestures to encourage you to drive "normally"?
LOL, that does not happen to me here in Colorado. It is obvious that people behind me would like faster acceleration, but I do make a point of staying in the right lanes and keeping up with traffic. Lots of drivers want to rush up the red lights and stomp on their brakes too. I avoid the brake pedal as much as possible, and keep the brakes in the regen zone when I do.
 

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You mean other drivers are tailgating you and using unfriendly hand gestures to encourage you to drive "normally"?
I keep the hyper-miling to a minimum when there is someone behind me. And, they can stick it somewhere anyway. Most of the time, it is people in big Suburbans or similar, only one person in the vehicle, and of course their time is much more important than mine. 75% of the time, we both stop at the same next red light, so it accomplished nothing for them to go flying around me.
 

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I've been hypermiling (or attempting to, anyways) since I got this car in November last year. I was averaging about 38 MPG.

Last month, I reset my MPG meter and decided to stop caring about fuel economy. Hypermiling is a lot of work and I'd rather not care, even if it costs me a few MPG. So I changed my driving habits to completely ignore fuel economy. I drive in sport mode full time, accelerate quickly, occasionally punch it going up hills just for fun, etc.

Interestingly, for the last ~2,500+ miles since I reset the fuel economy gauge, my average has been a personal best, by far. I think hypermiling in this car may be a pointless endeavor.

View attachment 152951
I get nothing less than 50 and the lowest has been 45 in winter. The highest so far was 55-60.

FYI: I opened a Toyota case on the inaccuracy of the HV batt level.
 
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