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Just so you all know, i did a search but never seemed to get the answer (or more likely i just didn't understand it.)

age old problem - I have a brand new overpriced Toyo as my spare and would like to use it up. You know what's coming - i dont want to buy 3 of these so my plan is one brand on the front/one brand on the back (all measurements the same of course!)

NOW - i know all responses to this question have been "hmm maybe not. not good to mix brands on any 4WD or AWD cars"

BUT i thought my 2012 rav4 is always in 2 WD Unless it starts to slip then it snaps into 4WD, then when danger is over, back to 2WD, SO if this is true then are mixed brands really a problem on what seems to be a mostly 2WD 2012 rav4?

thank you
Hoss
 

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The tire situation actually involves using tires of the same diameter on the front and of the same diameter on the rear, If you use your Toyo on the front you should use another equivalent new Toyo also on the front. You should be able to use two equivalent tires of another brand on the rear. The same brand recommendation is because two equivalent tires of the same brand should be of the same diameter. One problem with all of that is when rotating tires one obviously should rotate front-to-front and rear-to rear, which may not balance out wear as well as using all four same brand and equivalent tires.

Personally I sometimes wonder whether the situation isn't somewhat overblown. Much of our driving is done on mountain and other roads with lots of curves, which means that the various wheels very frequently rotate at different speeds anyway. It would seem that the same diameter situation is much more important with a lot of straight line driving especially on highways.
 

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Just so you all know, i did a search but never seemed to get the answer (or more likely i just didn't understand it.)

age old problem - I have a brand new overpriced Toyo as my spare and would like to use it up. You know what's coming - i dont want to buy 3 of these so my plan is one brand on the front/one brand on the back (all measurements the same of course!)

NOW - i know all responses to this question have been "hmm maybe not. not good to mix brands on any 4WD or AWD cars"

BUT i thought my 2012 rav4 is always in 2 WD Unless it starts to slip then it snaps into 4WD, then when danger is over, back to 2WD, SO if this is true then are mixed brands really a problem on what seems to be a mostly 2WD 2012 rav4?

thank you
Hoss
I have a base with the matching spare rear tire. When new I rotated the 5th (spare) every time I did my rotation and wore all 5 down.

I had some rear end alignment issues (neg camber eating away the inside edge) and bought 2 or 3 used tires. Mixed brands but the same size. Actual tire size from make to make even P metric to LT vary. Looked up the specs to make sure that the used tires where the same size. Ran those for the rest of the reason till I swapped to my winter tires/wheels and got 4 new tires in the spring. Kept the best tire of the mix for the spare. Now I have a 40% spare, that no longer gets used.

I had no issue with the drive train. The owners manual states that tries need to be within 2%(?) diameter of each other. Made the calculation before and that is a pretty big range. If over the car will not go into 4wd.

Though in high traction situations the part time 4wd only uses the 2 front wheels for propulsion most of the time, EVERY TIME you take off from a start, the car engages 4wd till you get up to 25(?) mph.

A side to side difference in tire size will cause extra strain on the spider gears in the differential. I had an over sized spare in a 2wd truck. tires were 27" and spare was 29. Had a flat on the rear so I swapped on the spare not thinking too much about it. Get home 30-45 min drive. Mixed highway and surface street. Rear diff was too hot to touch.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thank you both for responding. I feel a lot better about using different brands now.
 

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I had no issue with the drive train. The owners manual states that tries need to be within 2%(?) diameter of each other. Made the calculation before and that is a pretty big range. If over the car will not go into 4wd.
As I recall the allowable range is 3% and it's one of the reasons I switched from Subaru to my RAV4.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
hmm good point - it looks untouched/ never used/never's touched dirt. you think the rubbers too old?
 

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hmm good point - it looks untouched/ never used/never's touched dirt. you think the rubbers too old?
I don't know how old your tire is - but they dry out and harden over time, increasing the odds of a catastrophic failure. When taking a road trip, do you tend to see a few cars on the side of road with a blown out tire? Most of the time it's because of age.

From what I've read, the general consensus is that for safety reasons tires should be replaced - regardless of mileage - at around 6 years of age due to the risk of failure. It's something a lot of people don't factor in when they buy used tires on Craigslist. Those "barely used winter tires!" may in fact be 7 years old and should not be installed on any vehicle.

There may be exceptions – if by some miracle the tires were stored in a climate controlled environment and thoroughly moisturized a few times a year - but even then they may still fail due to age.

Check the date stamp on the spare tire to determine its age: Tire Safety: Expiration Dates – Ag Safety and Health

My spare tire is now 10 years old and I plan to replace it (with the cheapest 17" tire I can find) when I buy new all season tires this Spring. I know some people rotate their spare alongside the other four tires, but I have a bike rack mounted to my spare that makes it slower/more complicated - and I don't want the tire store messing with it.

When replacing the spare, remember that it has a TPMS sensor in it that is also likely due for replacement (the batteries typically last 10 years at the most). Shop around online to save big $$ on the sensors - as the tire shops charge way too much money for them.
 

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When replacing the spare, remember that it has a TPMS sensor in it that is also likely due for replacement (the batteries typically last 10 years at the most). Shop around online to save big $$ on the sensors - as the tire shops charge way too much money for them.
I think this happend in my new-to-me 2011. I have bought it with the TPMS light on. After replacing the sensors, how do you relearn the new ones?
 

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I think this happend in my new-to-me 2011. I have bought it with the TPMS light on. After replacing the sensors, how do you relearn the new ones?
You can buy pre-programmed sensors, in which case the light should reset on its own. If they need programming, your local tire store can quickly takes care of this with a handheld device.

Make sure you have checked the air pressure in your spare tire - that may be why your light is on.
 
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