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I have a Rav4 2019 XLE AWD,
I did install a tow hitch and now I want to tow a small boat that weights around 2200#. So I was wondering how can I add a transmission cooler? To help with the extra towing weight.

Also i was planning to add:
Cusco Strut Tower Brace Front and the Cusco Power Brace Rear Member to help with the extra load .

I live about 5 miles from the boat slips, I just want to make sure it will tow the boat and safely load and unload it from the trailer without damage to the Rav4.

Any other suggestions?
 

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I wouldn't be too concerned about the transmission for short trips like that as long it's flat towing, no long, steep climbs, considering the tow limit for the same vehicle in other parts of the world is well over 3000lbs, just keep the speed down. I'd be more concerned about having brakes on the trailer which are required over 1,000lbs tow weight and make a big difference for emergency stops, specially on wet pavement.
 

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If you really want to, and it’s a good idea for transmission longevity anyway, a stacked plate cooler is the better way to go. If you’re in a colder area (someplace that actually gets winter) you can fine them with a cold bypass too.

I agree completely with Quickdtoo about the brakes though. I wonder if the 4.5 XLE carries larger brakes than the LE, as was the case with the 4.4 - does anyone know about that? Either way, at 2200 lbs, I highly recommend trailer brakes too.
 

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I wouldn't be too concerned about the transmission for short trips like that as long it's flat towing, no long, steep climbs, considering the tow limit for the same vehicle in other parts of the world is well over 3000lbs, just keep the speed down. I'd be more concerned about having brakes on the trailer which are required over 1,000lbs tow weight and make a big difference for emergency stops, specially on wet pavement.
Most states require trailer brakes at 3000lbs. There are a few that require brakes at 1500lbs (Cali, NV, NH, Idaho). NC is 1000lbs.

https://www.rvia.org/media/145
 

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I believe all ICE Rav's have a transmission cooler.

Someone else can speak up if I am wrong, but the only difference I can find between the 3500lb tow rating on the Adventure and the regular ICE is the engine oil cooler. I actually wouldn't mind adding an engine oil cooler to mine even though I do not tow - but I haven't delved into how much it would take.

Also, the SAEJ2807 tow rating standard which everyone follows is a bit of a farce based on some of the requirements in it - for example you need to be able to tow up this monumental hill in Arizona at highway speed in 100F temps with the AC on - something most of us will never encounter.
 

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I believe all ICE Rav's have a transmission cooler.

Someone else can speak up if I am wrong, but the only difference I can find between the 3500lb tow rating on the Adventure and the regular ICE is the engine oil cooler. I actually wouldn't mind adding an engine oil cooler to mine even though I do not tow - but I haven't delved into how much it would take.

Also, the SAEJ2807 tow rating standard which everyone follows is a bit of a farce based on some of the requirements in it - for example you need to be able to tow up this monumental hill in Arizona at highway speed in 100F temps with the AC on - something most of us will never encounter.
It's definitely a farce. Most single axle trailers with a 3000lb (or less) rating, do not have brakes. Any trailer with brakes already weighs over the 1750lb towing limit on our vehicles. This is just Toyota covering their asses. Pulling a trailer is an acquired skill that requires instruction and practice. Toyota can't write this into the owners manual so they choose to write a ridiculously low towing limit assuming that all people are dumb.
 
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I contemplated installing a transmission cooler just for transmission longevity since I plan on keeping the vehicle long term. I decided against it while the vehicle is still under warranty. I feel that an after market cooler could give the dealer ammunition to deny warranty coverage if there are any transmission issues later. Installing a cooler involves tapping into the existing lubricating and cooling lines. I don’t believe for a minute it would actually cause a problem if done correctly, but any manufacturer is motivated to deny coverage if there is a reasonable argument to be made.
 

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I contemplated installing a transmission cooler just for transmission longevity since I plan on keeping the vehicle long term. I decided against it while the vehicle is still under warranty. I feel that an after market cooler could give the dealer ammunition to deny warranty coverage if there are any transmission issues later. Installing a cooler involves tapping into the existing lubricating and cooling lines. I don’t believe for a minute it would actually cause a problem if done correctly, but any manufacturer is motivated to deny coverage if there is a reasonable argument to be made.
One viable option could be to have the additional transmission lines and the factory rad with built-in cooler from the Adventure installed in your non-adventure RAV. This would result in a transmission cooler using original Toyota parts, as a Toyota system. Those added parts would not be subject to the comprehensive 3/36 warranty, but would not be cause for warranty claim denial in case something happens with the transmission down the road, since they are Toyota’s own parts. The only catch with this is that it would be quite pricey, using OEM parts. Depending on where the vehicle is registered, there’s a big difference in the way warranty claims would work with an external cooler. In the USA there is the Magnusen-Moss Warranty Act, which many people have described as being very useful in that it requires the manufacturer (or their service rep) to demonstrate that the warranted part failure was caused by the aftermarket part which was used or installed. As I understand it, this was originally intended that owners don’t need to install dealer replacement parts (filters, etc) to maintain warranty coverage - the rumour mill held that some manufacturers were denying a claim for a failed major part (like an engine) because the oil and air filters were NOT from the dealer. The act has (according to the internet, for what that’s worth) been used for cases similar to an external transmission cooler, in that it’s an inert part that transmission fluid passes through, similar to a fluid line, and couldn’t cause a failure by itself. And with transmission fluid we’re not aware of any issue with over-cooling, so to speak. In Canada, we don’t have a specific Act like MMWA and instead have a hodgepodge of regulations and laws which vary depending on which province one is in.
 
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