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I have a 97 rav4 AWD that has been recently guzzling 10 more gallons of gas than normal. It doesn't matter if its in ECT mode or not, the guzzling amount is the same. Took it to a mechanic and they said they checked everything that would deal with fuel delivery or consumption and had not found anything faulty. There is no check engine light or any weird dash lights on.

I did get my timing belt and water pump done recently, but I feel like the gas consumption started before that and just gradually got worse for some reason. The car lacks power, more than normal. I checked tire pressure and that appears normal.

I know that I will eventually need a catalytic converter because I can hear the familiar rattling when I accelerate quickly, but I never heard of that causing that much gas consumption.

Anyone got any ideas?
 

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Where are you located? Have you been warming it up more because of colder weather?
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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If you have a stock intake system, check that nothing is blocking the intake point, mine used to get clogged with weeds and stuff when off roading, terrible place for an intake, that's why I went to a snorkle. Check the obvious things first as others have said, tune up stuff, spark plugs, wires, timing, air filter, coils, O2 sensors...

Another common problem is the distributer cap and rotor which I believe the 97 has. You can have a carbon track and/or moisture inside the cap. The contacts on the cap or rotor can be worn or burnt.

Your timing belt could be loose and could have jumped, mine made a rattling noise from stretching and being old (timing belt slap) before I replaced it. I know you said you replaced it but maybe it wasn't tightened properly.

You may want to pick up a bluetooth OBDII scanner that you can use with a bluetooth device such as a smartphone, tablet, or computer so you can check the codes. Or, you can go to a parts store and ask them to check, most will do an OBDII read for no charge and give you a print out of any codes. You can rest any codes and see if they recur.

A bad O2 sensor should throw a code that would be picked up on an OBDII scanner.
 
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