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Had the RAV4 in for service today and their "Health Report" says that I need the spark plugs to be replaced (5 years/100,000 miles) Yes, the car is 5 years old but with 63K miles. Price...$229.00.
I am a big DIY and have changed many plugs years ago but the back ones on the V6 looks like project.
Any suggestions?
Thanks, Bob
 

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I wouldn't bother at 63K, maybe twice that.
You either take part of the intake plenum off for easy access or leave it on if you're comfy working by feel and with a mirror.
 

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Had the RAV4 in for service today and their "Health Report" says that I need the spark plugs to be replaced (5 years/100,000 miles) Yes, the car is 5 years old but with 63K miles. Price...$229.00.
I am a big DIY and have changed many plugs years ago but the back ones on the V6 looks like project.
Any suggestions?
Thanks, Bob
My 2c? Leave em be, with only 63k, should continue to run fine for a long time.
 

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My '11 V6 RAV has the OEM spark plugs, only about 13,000 miles, and runs great after 5 years. RAV spark plugs should be changed on the basis of mileage and not that of time/years. Agree with previous posters.
 

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So, since 144 months = 12 years, Blogson will need to change his plugs in 2023. :roll:
 

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Both of our '08 models have the original plugs and both have less than 25K miles. One of those was made in '07 as an '08 model. Still run perfectly and can't feel them at idle. Let them be. Frankly ours will likely never be changed in our remaining lifetime(s).
 

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So, since 144 months = 12 years, Blogson will need to change his plugs in 2023. :roll:
LOL - could you kindly send me a reminder when that time arrives (if I'm still around . . )?
:wink
One somewhat comparable situation was that per the Owner's Manual maintenance chart I changed my motorcycle's plugs at 7500 miles - a complete waste of time and money as the plugs I pulled looked like new, no deposits, and even the gaps were right on spec.
 

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LOL - could you kindly send me a reminder when that time arrives (if I'm still around . . )?
:wink
Sure if I'm around too. :thumbs_up: Actually I'll probably suggest checking one and you'll likely be putting it back in just like the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone

Sure if I'm around too. :thumbs_up: Actually I'll probably suggest checking one and you'll likely be putting it back in just like the bike.


Kind of thought the same thing. Just another way for dealers to make money. Why would change spark plugs at 5 years. I think they added that in.


Thanks for all the reply's and can someone send me a reminder in 2023. Send it to the nursing home.
 

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Here's a 30,000 foot view of things. Spark plugs do not work perfectly and then stop working perfectly as if someone flipped a switch on them. They wear a tiny bit with every sparked ignition. That said, if someone wants to run their plugs 120K miles between changes, that's perfectly fine by me, and it may well not be problematic. However, you have to recognize that at 60K miles, the plugs have worn half-way to the 120K mile point in terms of altered gap and sparking conditions. There is also an associated slow degradation on fuel economy and running smoothness as the plugs wear.

The most reasonable recommendations I've run across suggest pulling the plugs and inspecting them about every 30K miles for combustion byproducts (corrosion, deposits, etc.) and overall gap conditions. You can regap if necessary and regain some of the combustion efficiency loss due to the wear up to that point in the plugs' life. Besides, periodically pulling and inspecting your plugs gives you a slightly extended look under your hood which might not otherwise take place on a highly reliable vehicle, and you just might catch something else before it becomes an issue while you're driving down the road. It's sort of "Duhhh!", but things only break when they are being used, and the hardest part of that truth is choosing to be proactive and fix things at your own convenience with your own tools BEFORE you get stranded somewhere away from home.

One last comment. Spark plugs really are not very expensive, anyway.
 

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Sure if I'm around too. :thumbs_up: Actually I'll probably suggest checking one and you'll likely be putting it back in just like the bike.
Thanks much - with my motorcycle I should have done what I did with a previous one. Got it after lead was removed from gasoline I ran it for 40,000 miles on the same plugs. Pulled one and it was still clean and in spec. Reinstalled it without doing anything to it and ran the bike for years longer until I replaced it, and it was still running fine.
But I'll still look forward to having your RAV reminder! :smile
 

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...if someone wants to run their plugs 120K miles between changes, that's perfectly fine by me, and it may well not be problematic. However, you have to recognize that at 60K miles, the plugs have worn half-way to the 120K mile point in terms of altered gap and sparking conditions. There is also an associated slow degradation on fuel economy and running smoothness as the plugs wear...
I'm with you on this, seeing a small fuel economy degradation. I'm now at 91k-miles, track my usage very closely. The past year in 10k-miles, I've noticed a tiny drop from 25.0 to 24.2mpg. All driving same, maintenance performed same, air and oil filters. I'm thinking it's the spark plugs. So since this is a kind of a slow motion thread, will change them out and post in a year if that was the culprit.

Most people wouldn't sweat a 3% reduction, but as you say, spark plugs are cheap. And easy access/replacement at least for the 4-banger.
'
 

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Keep in mind that with some engines (V-6 RAV) pulling the rear bank of plugs is no simple task. Also gaping iridium tipped plugs without buggering them up is not the easiest thing to do. On the V-6 pulling plugs for inspection would be akin to torture..... just replace them. On the four bangers there's nothing to it.
 

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I realize this thread is old, but here's my 2 cents. I agree with those who say to pull them and check them. At the very least run them against the wire wheel on your bench grinder or such. I have an old spark plug cleaner that is operated with air and basically sand blasts them. It'll remove most of any carbon build up and such. A little carb clnr sprayed into them will likely get any residual oil residue. This has always been a yearly practice for me with all my vehicles...tractors, 4 wheelers, etc. On vehicles with harder to reach than usual plugs, such as an old 305 Chevy, just replace them while you are in there...save your knuckles!
 

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Although I completely get the concept of maintaining clean spark plugs, we're talking about 5-year old plugs in this case. Just because you can, does NOT mean that you either need to or should!

Plugs are cheap. Those "cleaned" 5 year old plugs are not going to gain another 5 years of life... do it once. Pull them and replace them. You can always skip a few eating out sessions to save up money if you really can't afford the little bit of cash to pay for them up front.
 

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I realize this thread is old, but here's my 2 cents. I agree with those who say to pull them and check them. At the very least run them against the wire wheel on your bench grinder or such. I have an old spark plug cleaner that is operated with air and basically sand blasts them. It'll remove most of any carbon build up and such. A little carb clnr sprayed into them will likely get any residual oil residue. This has always been a yearly practice for me with all my vehicles...tractors, 4 wheelers, etc. On vehicles with harder to reach than usual plugs, such as an old 305 Chevy, just replace them while you are in there...save your knuckles!
I wouldn't do this with the iridium tipped plugs on our RAV4's. The iridium tip is thin and very brittle. Denso says you should not attempt to re-gap them because the tip will likely break off. I have seen pictures of these plugs after 100K miles, and they look great!
 

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I replaced all 6 of my plugs due to the faulty coils Toyota installed on the V6s at around 50,000 miles IIRC.

I did have a tough time getting the back 3 out because it is the V6.

But all 6 were quasi seized. It took A LOT of patience, cussing out Toyota and jiggling back and forth to get them out without breaking them.
I generously lubed the threads on the new ones with anti-seize.

The engine absolutely perked up with the new plugs.

I wouldn't go 100,000 miles on any plug for just these reasons. I learned a little lesson.
 
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