Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Hey guys. Newbie to RAV4's. Not new to Toyota's (Tacoma, Sienna, Prius V)

Today, I purchased a 2010 2.5L Base AWD with 115k miles on the odometer.

I avoided the 2.4L oil consumption nightmare, and did a quick eyeball for oil seal leak at the rear diff, but need to look closer.

Tomorrow it goes to the local Toyota Dealership to take care of 3 recalls:
1. NHTSA #15V689: Power Window Master Switch (PWMS)
2. NHTSA #16V096: EV Rear Outboard Seat Belts
3. NHSTA #16V596: Replace both rear lower arm assemblies

The next couple weeks, I'll change all fluids to full synthetic.

Goal is to hit a minimum of 250k miles.

Will use this forum to extract guidance and suggestions

Thanks!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,530 Posts
Congratulations! Should be a great vehicle for your daughter. She apparently is planning to do a lot of driving....:wink
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
Hey guys. Newbie to RAV4's. Not new to Toyota's (Tacoma, Sienna, Prius V)

Today, I purchased a 2010 2.5L Base AWD with 115k miles on the odometer.

I avoided the 2.4L oil consumption nightmare, and did a quick eyeball for oil seal leak at the rear diff, but need to look closer.

Tomorrow it goes to the local Toyota Dealership to take care of 3 recalls:
1. NHTSA #15V689: Power Window Master Switch (PWMS)
2. NHTSA #16V096: EV Rear Outboard Seat Belts
3. NHSTA #16V596: Replace both rear lower arm assemblies

The next couple weeks, I'll change all fluids to full synthetic.

Goal is to hit a minimum of 250k miles.

Will use this forum to extract guidance and suggestions

Thanks!!!!
I have a 2009 Rav and have had all those recalls done. The only one that I ran into a problem was the rear assemble arms. They had to do the recall 3x to get it right. Many have had problems with this on the forum. Note that they seal the rear so there is no adjustments able to me made unless you take it back to the dealer. Which they try to charge you hundreds of dollars. Making sure the alignment is done right the first time to save you time and energy in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
OK. Back from the Toyota Dealership. All four Open Recalls completed:
1. CGG07A: Rear Outboard Seatbelts, protective cover
2. CGG58A: Rear lower suspension arms, replace, align
3. 2611HB: Power Window Master Switch, grease
4. ELSBOS: ECM Software, update

Dealer states:
1. Right Rear Shock is leaking: Replace $365
2. Rear Diff Axle Seals leaking: Replace $706
3. Rear Brakes "Low": Replace $305

I laughed and took the RAV4 home.

I'll verify the leaking shock and rear diff axle seals and then research what rear shocks to buy and will order OEM axle seals online.

I did examine the brake pads before buying the car. Rear pads should last about 50k more miles :)

Also researching what fluids I'll be changing the next few weeks: Transaxle fluid, Rear Diff fluid, Transfer Case. So far, looks to be the same as my 2nd Gen Tacoma and Prius V. I'll change to all synthetics. I'll install a Fumoto Quik Valve for rapid/spill free future oil changes.

K&N Washable Air Filter and Washable Cabin Air Filter will be ordered soon.

Denso Iridium Spark Plugs will be changed in 5k miles @120k odo miles

Wiper blades will all be replaced.

Brake fluid looks clean, I'll flush and replace when I change brake pads.

Coolant looks clean. I'll change when everything else is done and I'm bored.

This is a Base Model AWD, so no mudflaps or fog lights and other fancy stuff. Any suggestions on good fitting aftermarket mudflaps and foglights that will fit inside the empty space in the fascia?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Welcome to the forum. I like your approach to swap out all the fluids and start fresh. You can use the search feature and get tips on all the procedures you mentioned. I have an 09 Base model and also think it would be an excellent car for a new driver due to great visibility, AWD in snow, functional cabin and overall safety of an SUV. I've had fantastic reliability while pushing 90k miles so far.

...This is a Base Model AWD, so no mudflaps or fog lights and other fancy stuff. Any suggestions on good fitting aftermarket mudflaps and foglights that will fit inside the empty space in the fascia?
It's fun to upgrade the Base model. Some suggestions:

Mudflaps. Here's an OEM Toyota kit from a dealer at a good price:
MUDGUARDS - BLACK - W/O FENDER FLARES for 2010 Toyota RAV4|PT769-42091 : Genuine OEM Toyota Parts & Accessories | toyotajaxparts.com

Foglights. Yeah, those faux blank inserts are horrid. There are several kits on Amazon like this one, CarID is a forum sponsor:
https://www.carid.com/2010-toyota-rav4-fog-lights/

Bonus Suggestion: Rear Camera, safety item for the close-in rear blind spot. I was pleasantly surprised with this little setup. Inexpensive without having to upgrade the head unit:
https://www.amazon.com/Pyle-PLCM4500-Rearview-Waterproof-Adjustable/product-reviews/B00BOPOY70/ref=cm_cr_dp_synop/161-2626222-0207944?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=0&sortBy=recent#R1N6QK183L54AO

You and daughter will surely enjoy the RAV!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: ilvcrv

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,017 Posts
Forget the washable K&N air filters. I used those for years and now don't. The suck at filtering. The wash and oiling kit is expensive. oil cotton gauze is old tech, like they used it in the 50s. I was tooting EA type dry reusable for a while (still do for my truck). But just get paper filters for the RAV.

Cabin filters I recently switched to carbon filters. I won't go back. Makes a HUGE difference. I live in an area that gets a lot of wide fires in the summer, and wood burning smoke in the winter. I can drive through some smoke and the cabin fills with smoke. Turn the recuirc on, and within a minute the cabin is clear of smoke. AWESOME.

Mud flaps catch a slight bit more mud, but hardly noticeable difference. I still like them. I went OEM. was not very expensive.

Shocks several after market for the rear. Less options for the front.

Brake pads. As you might know already, with the 2 piston sliding caliper design, the pads that are up against the pistons (inner) do the majority of the work and thus receive the majority of the wear. Make sure that you are not just looking at the outer brake pad as the inner pad is hard to see. The wear indicator are typically on the inner pad so that is a good fail safe. When in doubt put new pads in as they are cheap and easy. Gives you a chance to make sure the sliding pins are still sliding and lubed.
 

·
Your Humble Administrator
2008 RAV4 Limited V6
Joined
·
16,716 Posts
Yes, I agree with MrPulldown on the cabin filters. I use the FRAM Fresh Breeze filter with activated charcoal and baking soda. About 10 bucks from Amazon and well worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Good suggestions. I've had no issues with K&N air filters for all my Toyota's the past 35 years or so, so I'll stick with them. Call me old skool :)

You're likely right on the inner brake pads. I'll take a closer look when I start exploring the wheel wells and undercarriage in the next several weeks. These are an easy afternoon fix, if needed.

My priority right now are changing the drivetrain fluids. I just don't trust that they've been changed according to Toyota's frequency intervals. Axle seals are my other high priority.

Next in priority list are Foglights. Then mudguards.

I think the rear shocks can wait (unless I find them to be grossly leaking)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top