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Discussion Starter #1
https://youtu.be/I0u61Y5ucnY

I just made this video fifteen minutes ago. Very sticky clutch, can't drive the thing. Replaced Slave the other day, Master came in today and now this. Any thoughts and feelings? Experience here, did you have to replace the line? I can follow the end from the slave to a junction in the center of the engine bay, but I lose this one along the fire wall.
 

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Is the flare got any burrs preventing it from seating properly? I would take it out and check the fitting at both the line and slave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It doesn't appear to be seating properly, whether it's a matter that the flare fitting doesn't cooperate with the threads or shape of the internal mating surface of this MC is both a different shape and composition from the AISIN brand I pulled out. I took the part back out and will return to NAPA after work today- I will order a name-brand one from Toyota.. It should be noted that the steel line with the flare fitting installed still has remarkable forward and backward movement within the MC. Thanks for a response, my clutch dumped me into traffic on the way to work one day, shop tells me I need a new throwout bearing, but I want to confirm that it isn't a rotten hydraulic system before I murder my car trying to change the clutch.


Edit - Clutch pedal was always fairly unusual to me, but still more firm than not (Atleast, until the MC was removed yesterday), just not fully disengaging the clutch- grabs very hard with engine on going into and out of all gears, tires slightly engage if you apply pressure to shifter.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Suggest I'm replacing the brake line between the two clutch cylinders on a Rav4 that's nearing the end of it's life, is there any reason that I can't make a shortcut overtop the valve cover?
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Suggest I'm replacing the brake line between the two clutch cylinders on a Rav4 that's nearing the end of it's life, is there any reason that I can't make a shortcut overtop the valve cover?
I don't understand, unless you have a right hand drive RAV4, this is where my clutch hydraulic line is located - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0N4qdhM8CoaX0h6bkxBQVQ5Q0E, so why would you need to go over the top of the valve cover? This is directly behind the transmission and is difficult to get to when the engine and tranny are in place.. I took the photo while I had the engine and tranny out replacing a kaput tranny.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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In the photo I put the flex line upright like that to keep it from leaking everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am so far beyond annoyed right now, lol. Wrote up two long posts and the website wont post it and loses it. I'll do one more rundown, if this doesn't post, **** it, car goes to the crusher and I'm done.






Clutch wont disengage.
Replaced SC, improved clutch grab point but air must have got in again
because it only lasted a few.


Replaced MC, NAPA sold me a broken part. Large perpendicular gash on threads of new part flatten and destroy threads on my flare nut so I can't test the system now.


Not too tore up about that though because now that I have inspected the system, the only worn looking section of the whole hydraulic clutch release system is the flex lines and the hard lines off both ends of it.
identifying these lines and replacing them is voodoo to me. I just want to run a hard line over top of the valve cover to the mc to avoid all of this headache if my clutch is grenaded and the car is junk anyway.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Okay, this is one of those things that most people don't know that will drive you crazy; the master cylinder reservoir has a divider inside that is difficult to see, so it looks like the MC is full (well the brake side is, but the clutch side can be empty. Drove me crazy trying to bleed it, till I discovered the internal MC reservoir.

The hard lines are just brake lines, you can get Copper/Nickel/Iron Alloy Tubing "NiCopp" at your local parts store, it is easily bendable by hand and tends to resist kinking, bring in your old piece and make sure the fittings are the right size. NiCopp lines won't corrode the way the original lines do. I'm considering replacing the whole flex/brake line system for a single AN-style stainless steel braided teflon hose that runs directly from the hydraulic clutch to the brake slave cylinder. You can make one yourself or have it made at a hose shop.

This link list all your part numbers for the clutch lines if it is a 99 RAV4 (you didn't say what year you have), you can search the site if it is a different year.

I still don't understand about going over the valve cover because mine goes nowhere near the valve cover.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #10
eodgator and Tom1977, thank you for the replies. Really, I'm alone in this frustration so this support makes a big difference in this project that is so dear to my quality of life..

Now about the car, yes, four door, hard top 1999 Rav4 L with about 125K on it, driver sits on the left side.

I'm back down to Earth now, so no fancy ideas of running the simplest route between the two cylinders (I thought maybe the flex hose was insulation from heat and that would have been just one more thing to wrap my poor, simple brain around)... But I've been out there and feel a lot better about it, especially with your part numbers! You missed a big detail with those two lost posts- that I had taken the car to a shop the day the clutch began sticking beyond driveability and they pointed out the SC and told me that since it moved and my pedal wasn't on the floor, I needed a new clutch. I wont believe that until I can rule out whether or not air is getting into the system (And, I still think it might be...)

I've applied PB blaster to both nuts off the flex line and will discover more reasons to give up tomorrow :wink
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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There is an inspection port, it is under the car (of course) looking from the engine towards the tranny there is an aluminum panel that you can remove and take a look in there, you cannot see much, a small section of flywheel and the clutch, maybe you can see what you have.

Oh yeah, you'll have to take off the plastic air damn that covers the lower engine/tranny area,
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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The flex hose allows the engine/tranny to vibrate and move without stressing rigid lines.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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I replaced my clutch with a kit that included the throwout bearing, clutch and pressure plate. My flywheel was heavily scarred so I replaced it as well. You should replace the rear main seal anytime you have to pull the tranny. By the way I don't think it's possible to pull the tranny without also pulling the engine. It is a lot of work but it can be done with a person with an average mechanical aptitude. You need a good maintenance manual, metric tools, torque wrenches in foot and inch pounds, an engine hoist (you actually lower the engine, you don't lift it out), large implements of destruction, and a vocabulary of curse words that would make a sailor blush (you may even invent a few new ones). I lowered my engine onto a tranny dolly and then used the engine hoist to lift the front of the RAV4 high enough that I could roll the engine out. Then, I lowered the RAV back onto jack stands and lifted the engine with the hoist to work on it. I did all the work that I've done on my RAV by myself. You can click on my name, then when my profile loads, click on statistics, then threads and you can review my mods and tranny replacement there.

Except for very few parts, I use aftermarket parts because Toyota is quite proud of theirs. However, only use Toyota thermostats, I tried two aftermarket ones before I figured out that only Toyota thermostats seem to work without overheating the engine.

A safety concern that I found on these lovely little beasts, under your car, driver's side is a plastic panel covering your brake and fuel lines, take the panel off and check for damage and corrosion on them, particularly where they go through the retaining clips. Mine were rusted almost completely through and broke when I tried to removed them from the retainers. I replaced them with NiCopp lines because they don't corrode.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just an update, the gash in NAPA's broken MC flattened the threads on my flare nut. Removing the hard line, I broke the "clutch line" aspect off of the black clip on the fire wall that also holds two brake lines and had to cut the steel line in half to remove it as unhooking both ends while simultaneously untangling it from the other 4 steel lines and removing it from the engine proved too much. I still have one good clip and will try to fabricate something out of gorilla tape to make up for the lost support.. Definitely wont end this with a line resembling factory, but I do think this might do the trick. . . . . .


Edit: I pulled off a rubber vent and got a good look at the springs and clutch cover, didn't see the aluminum plate that accesses the flywheel and disc but between rainy weather, work, and the hydraulic issue, I haven't given time to the task.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Fortunately for the integrity of my truck, nothing in life is cooperating with me so I've ordered the metal line from the Master Cylinder to the Flexible hose and I already have a the flexible hose replacement in hand.

I'm having a hard time getting around town to investigate, but the hour and a half I got to spend at a junk yard without the model of car I need tells me Toyota uses different flare nuts for their brake system as they do for their clutch system. The pep boys by my house doesn't have any generic lines, flares, flarenut, or what have you that is compatible. Pressure is on, my family wants me to get a new car, the old man's mental health is very poor and it is too much on his nerves to have autorepair done on his property, lol. I don't have a flat plot of my own, so not much I can say.
 

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I had the same problem with the flare nuts they use on the manual transmission rigid cooling lines, I couldn't find them anywhere on or off-line and even a local hose fabrication shop couldn't find them to make the hoses. I ended up having to replace the entire line from the transmission cooler to the transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I ordered the part yesterday and got an email today explaining that the part has been discontinued. I'm embarrassed to bring this car in anywhere but I feel like I'm running out of options.
 

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Try NiCOPP CNJ-330 alloy brake line, easily bends by hand, you can get it at auto zone, advanced auto, and NAPA. It is 30" long and should be long enough to replace either length of the line.
 

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I have the OEM line that goes between the clutch release cylinder and the flex hose that is in good repair, you can have it if need it, just pay shipping.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thank you, I'll give it one more spirited attempt and hit all of the local car shops up and down my strip, the 'local' junk yards, a hydraulic and driveline shop in downtown Cincinnati, and if I can really do what I want to do, junk yards in the greater metro area. I'm busy with my job from 4am to 330pm every day this week, so I'll post on this thread when I have more to say.
 
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