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I’m a high mileage RAV4 Hybrid driver. I’m not sure what mileage I’ll get from the OEM tires but had to replace one due to an encountered Road hazard. I have 32k miles on a 2017. The manual recommends only Eco type tires. I think it listed two brands. Is that the consensus to keep with those brands? Any recommendations?


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I would replace it with the exact same tyre. If there is only slight wear om the other tire on the same axle. If not I would get two new tires or find a shop that can get rid of some thread on the new tyre to match the old one.

My awd cars has always even wear on the front and rear axle, if that is not the case you should put the two best tires om the rear axle.
 

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I agree on the low rolling resistance tires except that one of four likely wouldn't make a measurable mileage difference.

But the fact that the Hybrid's rear wheels are powered by a separate electric motor and not via a mechanical linkage to the engine or front wheels as on other 4WD/AWD vehicles obviates the need for all tire diameters to be the same.
 
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I’m a high mileage RAV4 Hybrid driver. I’m not sure what mileage I’ll get from the OEM tires but had to replace one due to an encountered Road hazard. I have 32k miles on a 2017. The manual recommends only Eco type tires. I think it listed two brands. Is that the consensus to keep with those brands? Any recommendations?
The OEM tires are crap for the most part, even if they are LRR crap. There are many good tires that can exceed the OEM tire in every area.

You'll find ratings for most popular tires which include RR. Pick the tire you want that also has a decent MPG rating.

A few words about LRR tires:
While they are important for hybrids in general, they will make a lot less difference on the Rav4 than they do on a Prius. Certainly not enough difference to justify spending more for them, even at $4/gal gas prices.
LRR tires are a trade-off against traction and tread life, you can't have it all.

You don't state whether you have 17" or 18" rims. It makes a difference as there are a lot more choices in 17" than 18".
Go to www.michelinman.com and fill in your Rav4 details to see a list of tires that meet the OE specs. Most of them are rated either "8" or "9" for fuel efficiency. IF I was buying today I might get the Premier A/S or Premier LTX depending on the primary use.
 

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Gas prices aside, whats the reasoning behind your statment that LRR is less imortant on the RAV4h compared to the Prius?
 

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Gas prices aside, whats the reasoning behind your statment that LRR is less imortant on the RAV4h compared to the Prius?
A Prius has a fraction of the drag coefficient that a Rav4 has, making tires a much bigger portion of the total drag in the Prius. Small changes in a Prius can make big differences in the MPG.

Relatively speaking, in a Rav4 you're pushing a barn door down the road, so small differences in tire resistance make far less difference in MPG. I'd be surprised if the very best LRR tire could get you 0.5 MPG on average. (More in warm weather, less in cold weather.)
 

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A Prius has a fraction of the drag coefficient that a Rav4 has, making tires a much bigger portion of the total drag in the Prius. Small changes in a Prius can make big differences in the MPG.
Being nerdy here, but the drag coefficient (Cd) of the Prius of the same year is almost the same as the RAV4. It's not the Cd that matters in comparing the two but drag equation of which Cd is part. But I digress.

Toyota cares a great deal about streamlining. Looking at a 3rd generation model shows, for example, 'spats' in front of the tires. (Spats look like small, flat, steel mudflaps.) The headlights have a rather unusual flat spot on the outside top, which might seem counter-intuitive, but streamlining is not intuitive. (I think they aid in the flow around the mirrors at speed.) Another touch is (at least on mine) patches of thick composite stickers on the lower surface behind the rear doors. (Don't remove them. I suspect they protect a turbulent area from debris.) The wing over the rear window is important too, and has been lengthened to be more effective in later models. I strongly suspect that stock RAV4s are not equipped with mud flaps because of their negative effects upon drag. Of course the roof rack and/or crossbar deletion helps, too.
 

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The current Prius has a drag coefficient of .24, the Rav4 is .31 (same as Maserati Ghibli according to Wiki), so not exactly a barn door.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drag_coefficient


Toyota RAV4 AWD-i Hybrid 2016


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maserati_Ghibli
Your numbers are misleading also because total drag multiplies the drag coefficient times the vehicle's cross sectional area. There is no doubt that the RAV4 is notably bigger in that area also. With a 30% higher coefficient times what is likely a 30 to 50% (pure guess there) cross sectional area. You are getting closer to the proverbial barn door.
 

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^^^
Yes. You really only need to drive a Prius for a while to be aware of how little drag it has. It'll coast twice as far as the Rav4 HV in D or N.
 

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These came on mine too and that is what I replaced with too.


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I know I am a longs ways off from replacing mine, but I saw Bridgestone has a Dueler Ecopia. I wonder how good they do, compared to there other Ecopias.
 

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^^^
Yes. You really only need to drive a Prius for a while to be aware of how little drag it has. It'll coast twice as far as the Rav4 HV in D or N.

If you separate the drag and rolling into two components, logically the rav4 is a heavier vehicle so in absolute numbers it must be more important than on the prius with eco tires. Especially at lower speeds when rolling resistance is a bigger factor in relation to drag resistance (rolling be linear to speed, drag being quadrical to speed).
 

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Yokohama AVID ENVigor for the win.

Also, you folks are getting WAY too detailed on this stuff, just drive and appreciate the MPG you get. If you're so worried about drag, tire size, etc. take the city bus or don't drive at all.

Sorry to vent, but wow, it's just a car, and a few MPG a month, yet you'll spend $$$ on Starbucks a month. lolz....

Peace!
 
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