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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Okay, this works and I believe it is superior to the OE hoses, no steel to corrode, stainless steel wrap instead of cloth, much less expensive, easy to do, and it looks kool,

Use the following to make your own manual transmission hoses.

1) 6 ft @ $2.50 ft - LEDAUT AN6 Stainless Steel Braided Oil Fuel Line 6AN Car Racing Hose 4 Meters (12 ft) - Amazon.com - Make sure if you get a different hose that it is teflon or CPE to handle anything you want to run through it and high temperature. If you use teflon hose, make sure you get fittings specifically for teflon hoses or they will blow the fitting off (don't ask me how I know that).
2) 4 ea @ $10.85 ea - Russell 670520 Blue Anodized Aluminum -6AN Flare to 14mm Metric Adapter - Amazon.com - These fittings fit the transaxle and the cooler.
3) 2 ea @ $6.76 ea - Russell 610020 Red/Blue Anodized Aluminum -6AN Straight Hose End - Amazon.com - Attaches to each hose where it goes to the cooler
4) 2 ea @ $ 9.35 ea - Russell 610090 Red/Blue Anodized Aluminum - 6AN 45-Degree Hose End - Amazon.com - Attaches to each hose where it goes into the transaxle.
5) 2 ft of hose or other material to prevent chafing, keep the hoses separated, don't tie them together unless you have something between them to prevent chafing. I had some spare material laying around that I used.

Total Price $90.62 US

I went with 6AN hose and fittings because it is approximately the same inside diameter as the Toyota hoses. You could step up to 8AN but I wanted the better flexibility that you get with the smaller hose. Also no matter how large a hose you go with the 14mm fittings are your big restrictors and there is nothing you can do about it without modding the tranny and replacing the cooler.

Reuse the following:
Transaxle
Transmission oil cooler
Hose retention/separator brackets
RAV4

1) Drain the transmission - I flushed the transaxle with gear oil and ran it through the gears and let it sit for several days (the trans cooler was bypassed), I know this probably wasn't necessary but it was from a donor vehicle and I wanted to make sure it didn't have water or anything else nasty inside of it. When I refill it I will not use premium gear oil as I want to run it for several thousand miles and change it to a higher quality synthetic gear oil (perhaps Red Line Gear Oil) that is designed for synchronized manual transmissions.
2) I flushed the cooler with denatured alcohol and followed with gear oil.
3) Remove the hoses and all fittings from the transaxle and the cooler. There are two fittings on each leg of the cooler, remove both fittings.
4) Make your hoses 32" to 35" long with a straight and a 45 degree hose end on both hoses. The hoses must have some slack in them to allow for engine movement and vibration. To make the hoses, go to YouTube, there are several easy tutorials. You don't need any special tools, but I would advise a vise as a minimum, there are some handy tools to make it easier, but they aren't required. I start long and if I muck up a cut, I have room to cut and still have plenty of hose.
5) Wrap the 14mm x 1.5 fittings with teflon tape and install into the transaxle and the cooler. I put a crushable washer on the fittings going into the transmission and cooler to make sure I've got a good seal.
6) Install the hoses with the straight end going to the cooler and the 45 degree end pointing upwards on the transaxle. Make sure you install anti chafing material where they will rub against something or each other.
7) Reuse the hose retention/separator brackets with new padding material to hold the hoses in place and keep them from chafing
8) Refill the transaxle.
9) Run it for several miles and check for leaks.

Notes:
1) I initially erroneously listed 3/8" NPT (national pipe thread) fittings, the actual fittings are metric 16mm x 1.5 (the larger fittings on the hard line and the adapter attached to the cooler) and 14mm x 1.5 (the cooler without adapter and the tranny with all fittings removed).
2) I tried to reuse the hard lines coming from the oil cooler and running into the engine compartment but I could not find a fitting that would work. To attach to the line you would need a 16mm x 1.5 female inverted flare to preferably a 6AN male flare fitting but I could not find one anywhere on the internet or by calling around to parts, speed, and hose making shops. I found 14mm x 1.5 and 18mm x 1.5 but not one 16mm x 1.5. The fitting has to be a female inverted flare fitting or it WILL leak.
3) I was initially attempting to use an in-line filter but after research I discovered it isn't practical with gear oil so this idea was scrapped.
4) Don't make the hoses too long or too short or you are more likely to have chaffing issues.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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2,045 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I added a transmission oil temperature gauge to my RAV4 to hopefully detect any tranny problems before they become too serious.

The logic behind a oil temperature gauge vs oil pressure gauge: Oil pressure would remain the same until it would get so low that the pump lost prime. I believe the gear oil temperature however would rise if the fluid was low.

I had a difficult time figuring out where to install the sensor, I finally had an epiphany and put it in the forward drain plug, the one that is vertical facing the frame. I drilled and taped the drain plug, put marine grade spade connectors on the wiring so it could easily be disconnected for transaxle gear oil changes.

Photo taken from under the transaxle - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0N4qdhM8CoaN2pnamd2Z2h4VjQ

My gauges thread is here - http://www.rav4world.com/forums/84-4-1-accessories/227009-install-double-din-radio-gauges-12v-power-point-usb-power-point.html
 
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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #3
The hose came in today and I made the hoses, very quick and easy, no special tools:
1) Put black electricians tape wrapped a couple of times tightly around the hose where I wanted to cut.
2) I used a narrow cutting wheel on an angle grinder to cut the hose. Make sure your cut is square. You can use a hacksaw and cut slowly, or run to Home Depot and use their cable cutter to make the cut.
3) DON'T pull the tape off or the stainless steel mesh will spread and you won't be able to put the fitting over it. Instead just push the fitting on over the tape. I placed the fitting against my workbench, grabbed the hose in one hand, and pushed the hose firmly into the fitting. You may need to use a wrench to turn the fitting while you are pressing it on to get it to seat properly. Look in the end, when you see that the hose has bottomed out against the base it's time to screw in the male part of the fitting.
4) I put a soft cloth in my vise, placed the conical female side in the vise, and tightened the vice just enough to hold the fitting in place.
5) Then I made sure I aligned the male end properly and tightened the male end until firmly against the female end. Watch for the hose being forced out while tightening, if it does, simply take it back apart to make sure you didn't damage the inner hose, align everything and repeat the tighten process.

I get my last fitting in tomorrow and will take pictures.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #4
The last 14mm fitting arrived and here are the photos:

Transaxle cooler hose connections - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0N4qdhM8CoaVkRoeDcwRUhQdmc

Transmission cooler upper hose connection - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0N4qdhM8CoaLWNNRUloVGdvZHM

Transmission cooler lower hose connection - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0N4qdhM8CoaZlFnNHVvWWduWFE

Transmission cooler and lines - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0N4qdhM8CoaZ1Y5dUVtUG11eUk

I think it came out very well. I used a 1" hose that I split to put over the hoses where they may chafe running back to the engine compartment.

I also wrapped up my remote oil filter project today, see http://www.rav4world.com/forums/94-4-1-d-i-y-modifications/245369-installed-oil-filter-relocation-adapter-kit.html
 
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I added a transmission oil temperature gauge to my RAV4 to hopefully detect any tranny problems before they become too serious.
If you have a smart phone, or laptop, you can plug in an OBD-ii bluetooth device and read all that stuff without adding stuff to your engine.
.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
If you have a smart phone, or laptop, you can plug in an OBD-ii bluetooth device and read all that stuff without adding stuff to your engine.
.
Yeah I have an OBDII bluetooth adapter but I wanted something that would give me some heads up at all times if there was a problem.

By the way, there are no sensors in the transaxle to warn you of an issue and there isn't an engine oil temperature sensor.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I forgot to mention, I pressure tested the hoses with 120 PSI for 10 minutes. 120 PSI is much much higher than anything the gear oil pump will put out.

Pressure test fittings - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0N4qdhM8CoaNTRsVXFsdjVxd3c

Note the AN fitting in the photos is a 10-AN I removed those and installed 6-AN fittings

The fittings consists of:
- 1 ea 1/4" pneumatic male connector
- 2 ea 3/8" to 1/4" reducer plugs
- 2 ea 3/8" couplings
- 2 ea 10-AN male flare fitting or whatever size you would need in this case I used 6-AN fittings
- 1 ea 1/4" plug

Note: You could just use an AN Flare Plug Male Nut and eliminate the following (I went this way because I already had the fittings and I would have to wait for an AN plug):
- 1 ea 3/8" to 1/4" reducer plugs
- 1 ea 3/8" couplings
- 1 ea AN male flare fitting
- 1 ea 1/4" plug
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #8
This project is complete unless I have a problem with one of the hoses, if I do I'll update this post.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #9
If anyone uses this information, please leave a comment letting me know how it went. Also, let me know if you have any improvements.
 
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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #10
Photos:






 

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eodgator, not sure if you can help me out, but I would like to do the same thing with an automatic of the same year. Do you or anybody else know if this would be possible?
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #13
FXMASTER, it will work with an automatic as well, you just need to confirm that the fittings and hoses are the same size and length. I don't have an automatic to compare it to, for a definitive answer.
Warning the metric threads are similar to SAE and NPT, make sure you only use metric fittings and follow my guide and I don't think you can go wrong.
Please, post your results here so everyone else knows what works.
 
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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #14
Mensajero, thanks, so far no issues except I blew my rear pinion bearings but, I found a Torsen carrier/differential that I'm going to install as soon as I get some of this hurricane mess finished.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #15
eodgator, not sure if you can help me out, but I would like to do the same thing with an automatic of the same year. Do you or anybody else know if this would be possible?
Did you make your hoses?
 

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Not yet, time has not been on my side for that project yet.
 

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I added a transmission oil temperature gauge to my RAV4 to hopefully detect any tranny problems before they become too serious.

The logic behind a oil temperature gauge vs oil pressure gauge: Oil pressure would remain the same until it would get so low that the pump lost prime. I believe the gear oil temperature however would rise if the fluid was low.

I had a difficult time figuring out where to install the sensor, I finally had an epiphany and put it in the forward drain plug, the one that is vertical facing the frame. I drilled and taped the drain plug, put marine grade spade connectors on the wiring so it could easily be disconnected for transaxle gear oil changes.

Photo taken from under the transaxle - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0N4qdhM8CoaN2pnamd2Z2h4VjQ

My gauges thread is here - http://www.rav4world.com/forums/84-4-1-accessories/227009-install-double-din-radio-gauges-12v-power-point-usb-power-point.html
I added a tranny cooler to my 2014 RAV4 and got the TORQUE app for my android. Transmission temp decreased 15°F from 205 to 190. I did that on a Honda minivan also and never changed my fluid cause it stayed looking new - never burnt. I'm a believer - factory coolers are not sufficient.
The TORQUE app is a whole lot simpler than installing a temp gauge.
 

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I installed mine years ago. I got the idea when I was driving my RX3SP, before I got married. All rotary vehicles have engine oil coolers. When I checked my trans-axle (Amsoil) oil, it's like new, the last 15 years. Never had to change it. Two years ago, I changed the clutch for a Zoom Clutch. The dude asked me if I wanted a good job. He said: Lets open the trans-axle and clean and check it. He was surprised of the condition of all the parts. NO parts, except the gaskets were changed. He just cleaned and pressure air dried it, NO emery found at all.He told me that the trasaxle will last for another 40 years. (BTW, oil is key also):wink
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #19
I added a tranny cooler to my 2014 RAV4 and got the TORQUE app for my android. Transmission temp decreased 15°F from 205 to 190. I did that on a Honda minivan also and never changed my fluid cause it stayed looking new - never burnt. I'm a believer - factory coolers are not sufficient.
The TORQUE app is a whole lot simpler than installing a temp gauge.
I use Torque as well, however the manual transmission on the RAV4.1 has no sensors for Torque to monitor that is why I added a gauge to monitor the gear oil temp. I use Red Line 75W90 Limited Slip Synthetic Gear Oil in my transmission and it keeps it running smoothly.

The RAV4.1 has no sensors to monitor engine oil temperature, oil pressure, or anything to do with the manual transmission.
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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Discussion Starter #20
Correction, it does monitor the speed.
 
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