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I am going to try just making one hose to looks the in/out on the transmission, my cooler is full of pin holes and I don't know what Toyota thought we were going to do with these things that we needed a cooler, but I don't need another point of failure flapping out there in the breeze :)
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Do you have an automatic or manual transmission? If automatic you will need the cooler, you may get by without it on the manual transmission but I wouldn't advise it. An aftermarket oil cooler is not that expensive.

I see from your post on another thread that you have a manual transmission, and personally I wouldn't remove the transmission cooler.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
It has been well over a year since I made my hoses and installed them and I've had no problems at all. By the way, my gauges are working fine as well. I did change the transmission gear oil to synthetic Red Line Gear Oil which made shifting smoother and the tranny quieter.
 

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Just wanted to revisit this thread for anyone wanting to do this as cheaply as possible. This is the second rusty AF Rav4 I have done this on. You don't really need an oil cooler on the manual transmission unless you are towing, and lets face it, these things can't tow anything you'd need to cool the transmission for. So here's what it looks like finished, using the same fittings eodgator did, you can get them on amazon or the usual Chinese sites, I think I got all mine off Banggood, I bought a whole selection of them in one kit a while back. I just looped out the cooler with a piece of AN line, wrapped the part of it that I clamped in the old retainer with some rubber line I had.:

143086



You will need to retain the o-rings from the old fittings and get new crush washers. I just bought a selection of them since they are cheap.

143087


Too lazy to get the old crusty cooler out of there, and knowing I would snap off every bolt on the bumper trying, I just blew the oil out of it with my compressor, pinched the ends off with vise grips and bent them upward.


143088



There's lot of youtube videos on how to put AN fittings on a line, if you buy cheap line like I did, you may have to leave the tape on because it frays instantly when you pull it off.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
It's been well over 3 years since the transmission fiasco with the cooler hoses and my upgrade to AN hoses and all is well. You can choose my method of retaining the transmission cooler or
tankd0g's method of bypassing it.
 

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I'd like to thank eodgator for this very helpful, detailed thread. Great photos!

We have a 1997 with a leaking oil cooler hose and I'm trying to decide whether to:

a) Purchase OE hoses and fittings.
b) Buy aftermarket.
c) Make them using eodgator's instructions.
d) Do a bypass using tankd0g's method.

Thoughts?

My guess (based on absolutely nothing more than a hunch) is that the oil cooler isn't necessary except in "extreme service" applications. I can't imagine that the gear oil in a transaxle gets that hot just cruising down the highway. If heat were an issue, then wouldn't most MT vehicles have oil coolers? Just curious.
 

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I'd like to thank eodgator for this very helpful, detailed thread. Great photos!

We have a 1997 with a leaking oil cooler hose and I'm trying to decide whether to:

a) Purchase OE hoses and fittings.
b) Buy aftermarket.
c) Make them using eodgator's instructions.
d) Do a bypass using tankd0g's method.

Thoughts?

My guess (based on absolutely nothing more than a hunch) is that the oil cooler isn't necessary except in "extreme service" applications. I can't imagine that the gear oil in a transaxle gets that hot just cruising down the highway. If heat were an issue, then wouldn't most MT vehicles have oil coolers? Just curious.
I would say if you can get the hoses off the cooler without issue you might as well put hoses back on the cooler, if it's crusty and likely to just break off at the fittings like mine were, don't bother trying to save it and just do the bypass.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
You can easily go either way, the bypass or a new cooler and lines. I kept the cooler because I do some off roading and light towing. Heat is the enemy so I chose make sure the transmission is protected.
 

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I would say if you can get the hoses off the cooler without issue you might as well put hoses back on the cooler, if it's crusty and likely to just break off at the fittings like mine were, don't bother trying to save it and just do the bypass.
Good advice. The only section that's obviously bad is the metal tube that connects to the 45* fitting at the transaxle. The rest looks surprisingly good -- almost new. I guess I'll go ahead and try to replace them.
 

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You can easily go either way, the bypass or a new cooler and lines. I kept the cooler because I do some off roading and light towing. Heat is the enemy so I chose make sure the transmission is protected.
We do very little off-roading but did recently install a hitch and get a light-duty (landscaping type) trailer. We don't use it very often, and when we do the load is usually light, but we did haul about 1,000 lbs worth of stuff on it once.

Anyway, the best option is clearly to keep the cooler connected if possible. From what I can tell (I haven't tried to break anything loose yet) I should be able to replace just the lower hoses and fittings. So far I've just hit everything with PB Blaster and then CorrosionX.

I really appreciate you listing everything required. I'll look into that first. If it doesn't get too complicated -- multiple vendors; long lead times; etc -- I'll go that route. Otherwise I'll get OE or aftermarket.

I saw that everything you purchased was about $90. A post in another thread here said the OE parts cost almost $270!! If that's true, that's some serious motivation to make your own hoses!
 

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eodgator,

I was rereading your post and see that you wrote:

2) "I tried to reuse the hard lines coming from the oil cooler and running into the engine compartment but I could not find a fitting that would work. To attach to the line you would need a 16mm x 1.5 female inverted flare to preferably a 6AN male flare fitting but I could not find one anywhere on the internet or by calling around to parts, speed, and hose making shops. I found 14mm x 1.5 and 18mm x 1.5 but not one 16mm x 1.5. The fitting has to be a female inverted flare fitting or it WILL leak."

I was hoping to reuse the hard lines myself. They appear to be in excellent condition. Based on what you said, I'm not even gonna bother trying to find the '16mm x 1.5 female inverted flare to a 6AN male flare fitting'. I'm still up for making the hoses up myself if necessary, but I'm thinking my best bet (if possible) is to find those 2 lower hoses (Haynes refers to them as "oil cooler No. 1 lines") ready made.

The thing is, I'm having a really hard time finding them OEM or aftermarket. Almost everything I've seen is for the automatic trans fluid (ATF) cooler. I tried putting "transaxle" and "manual transaxle" in the search, but no luck.

If you (or anyone else) can give me the part number(s) and/or good search terms I'd really appreciate it.

From what I can tell, the "$270" I mentioned above was probably for the cooler itself -- those 2 lower hoses shouldn't be anywhere near that expensive -- if I can find them. Needles to say, if they turn out to cost more than the ~$90 you spent I'll pass. I really like the appearance of the lines you made, but to be honest my main concern is that they don't leak and are durable.

BTW -- I see you have a Newmar Mountain Aire -- nice! We have a small (by comparison) 2009 Winnebago View that we get out in fairly often. We bought it in 2012 -- it's been a good rig overall.
 
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