Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,240 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Using the Tri-Phase is cool. But I'm noticing that it's good for low and middle power. After that, the engine starts behaving a little sluggish. With this I mean that you know the engine can do more power, but the Tri-Phase kind of limits its power in fifth gear. Solution;


My brother has his installed in his Hoda Si [Oh, did I misspell Honda] Anyway, :D it does make a great difference. The PDF are an explanation of the electronic system in question at the bottom of this article.

This is a short description of the product.

The Super AFC II (Air Flow Converter) is the industry standard for sub computer fuel control. The S-AFC II is designed to fine tune and "squeeze" power out of existing engine setups by allowing the user to modify the fuel curve with precision accuracy. Since the act of simply bolting on performance products does not make maximum horsepower, the S-AFC II allows the user to calibrate the fuel system in accordance with performance upgrades as they are installed. The AFC modifies the air flow meter/ pressure sensor signal voltage going to the factory ECU (Engine Control Unit) to change the amount of fuel injected. The S-AFC II utilizes a VFD (Vacuum Florescent Display) to display critical data in three different modes.

Features for the S-AFC II include:
Newly designed case and user interface, single button menu navigation, 12 point fuel correction in 200 RPM increments, data storage for two different correction maps, password protection, integrated knock monitor, and 4 different display options.

The S-AFC II, while not completely universal, comes preprogrammed with 15 of the most commonly used air flow meter/pressure sensor maps. By setting the AFC to one of these programs, the user is able to adjust injected fuel amounts by +/- 50%. 12 user defined RPM adjustment points allow for fine tuning in 200 RPM increments. Fuel can also be adjusted for part or full throttle situations.

The Deceleration Air Flow Correction cures erratic idle problems for Hot Wire vehicles equipped with an open atmosphere blow off valve. The S-AFC II can also display an incredible amount of data including: Air Flow Capacity (Hotwire and Flap Type only), Engine RPM, Throttle Position, Pressure Sensor voltage, Karmann Frequency, and Air Flow Meter Correction.

The S-AFC II displays data in three different modes: Numerical, Analog, and Graph. Numerical Mode allows the user to monitor up to four different parameters in numbers and also shows peak hold values on demand. The Analog Mode displays up to two values in an easy to read meter style display. Peak Hold is also included in this function. The Graph mode offers real time graph plotting with a Ghost map trace feature built in. The graph can replay movement up to 60 seconds.



http://www.apexi-usa.com/pdf/productDocumentation/202.pdf
http://www.apexi-usa.com/pdf/technicalDocumentation/202.pdf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
You really like making me jealous don't you? :lol: :p I've thought about all sorts of things, but you seem to keep beating me to the punch. haha One of these days I'm gonna get the jump on you. Great idea though. I think one of these would be a great add-on to the RAV. Later
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,240 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I just base my moves depending on what I read from the experts. [read below] Also, when I DO install these mods, I always take what I call; “The Feel of the Car”. Which means; How do I feel the car? Is it run better or worst? How can I fine tune the mod? We, on the island call that “Systematically Testing” The below information is from toysport.com. Besides, I'm a client and all that they have told me, is right on the money. dnylrq, we are RAV4 owners, with the same in mind. Drive on amigo. :wink:


(3/5SFE / 4/7AFE / 4/5EFE / 1ZZFE / and V6 / V8s)

The various FE series engines (using the FE head design) are the most thoroughly developed and purpose tuned Toyota power plants. In the USA, 98% of current models Toyotas use this engine/head design. The FE 4 valve per cylinder, narrow-angle Twin Cam heads (on the various Toyota blocks) are the reason for the amazing response and smoothness of the current generation Toyota motors. The high torque characteristic designed into these engines give the driver all the advantages of the Twin Cam head design- plus low-end torque and fuel economy. Torque is the reason why these engines respond quickly and smoothly. The performance band has been engineered to provide power from low RPM to the designated redline.

There has been a lot of requests for parts and modifications for these engines, but unfortunately trying to raise the RPM band (or changing cams) will negate all the built-in attributes of these engines. A camshaft change to raise the power band higher, will result in the loss of low-end torque and idling problems. Drivability will suffer and the trade off will leave the customer with a compromised engine, trying to work against the ECU program and engine design.

By comparison, the performance oriented GE versions of the same series engines, (if available on the sporty models)- offer about a 20% horsepower advantage- but at a loss in low RPM response and torque. The GE heads are more of the true Twin Cam design: wide-angle valves, long duration cams- suited for high RPM and high output- but at the sacrifice of throttle response in the lower RPM levels.

There are improvements that can be made to the FE engines- but the Toyota engineered power band should not be altered. The ECU program and Camshaft profiles, if changed will result in a loss of drivability and risk internal damage. You cannot do a better job than Toyota on coaxing power from these series engines, and needless to say, stay street-legal.

Upgrading these engines, is of course still possible: intake systems, exhaust components, ignition upgrades all help in fine-tuning these engines. The rule to follow and keep in mind is that all modifications are basically external in nature. The only exception being pistons- to increase or decrease compression- within the same RPM band. Turbocharging and/or supercharging will help- but keep in mind that based on the design parameters (again) these engines were designed for response- meaning lightweight internals: con rods/crankshaft (as compared to the sportier GE series engines).
8)

The short answer is- if you are seeking a true high performance engine and high HP outputs- upgrade to the GE version of your engine.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,554 Posts
Didn't I suggest the SAFC a long time ago, and several times at that ??? :roll:

If you're looking to make power in 5th gear, the SAFC is NOT the solution.... 5th gear is not meant for making power anyways...
Either way you are going to have to DYNO tune it in order to really tune it correctly, otherwise you may make things worse...

Also, I would rather use the previous version, it's much easier to use...but that's just my .02 cents...
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top