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MP3, who has the best deal?

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allofmp3.com
Check it out. The library isn't as big as some, but it's big and downloads run around $.006 - $.012. Legal, easy to use, and you choose your own encoding and compression level.
 
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Actually, AllOfMP3 isn't exactly legal. It hit a lovely gray spot if I remember right. It is based out of Russia, or something near there. Basically, they don't follow by the RIAAs (or European equivalent) rules. Hence why they are so cheap. The RIAA would love to shut them down. They just can't.
 
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SZRimaging said:
Actually, AllOfMP3 isn't exactly legal. It hit a lovely gray spot if I remember right. It is based out of Russia, or something near there. Basically, they don't follow by the RIAAs (or European equivalent) rules. Hence why they are so cheap. The RIAA would love to shut them down. They just can't.
Cause they are legal in Russia :roll:

Also its technically legal as you are by virtue of the Internet going to the server in Russia and buying the content there where the content is legally licensed. Even if it isn't legally licensed, the law says the seller is at fault, so you would not be liable.

Its like taking a trip to another country and legally buying a CD there and importing it back to the country on a trip - which is perfectly legal.

Current online music stores mostly use DRM'd music which basically violates fair use laws. Damn outdated record industry - change your model or die - don't stop the development of technology or lobby the government to ruin our fair use laws!

Another thing, why aren't they prosecuting Sony for hacking PCs with rootkit music CDs - breaking into computers is a crime even if it is agreed in hidden spyware like fashion...
 
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There is at least one class action lawsuit against sony regarding the spyware that was installed upon playing certain CDs. That stuff was nasty. Sony deserves to pay for what they did.

Although they are in Russia, does that give them right to redistribute as they please music from an american, british, french, or other source? They do not have rights to redristribute some of this music. Not having those rights is why they can do it so cheaply. The MP3s that you are buying are technically not legal US distributions.

I do agree that DRM is out of hand, but I also sympathize with the people who are doing it. In a perfect world it wouldn't be there. But for all the idiots who break the rules, they make it worse for the rest of us. If you download a song, and it is readibly available in a fully legal manner, I urge you to take that route. That said, I do have a few "illegal" MP3s. But of those, either they are limited or rare versions taht are impossible to find legal copies of in the States, or I own the CD, and have it downloaded due to the CD not working, or because I am too lazy to rip the CD.

That said, I do believe our music industry has taken quite the decline and is blaming their lack of sales on filesharing rather than the true problem, inferior products.
 
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Here is more on the topic, the Internet creates interesting legal questions since distance and borders do not mean anything:

In the User Agreement Allofmp3 states that you may not use the service if it is in conflict with the legislation of your country. Allofmp3 has added this as a kind of disclaimer of course.

Every country has its own rules. There is no such thing as a set minimum of international intellectual property standards. That makes it impossible to answer this question in general.

Let's take a closer look at the law in a country with very liberal copyright legislation and a country with strict copyright laws.

Liberal copyright legislation
A country that has very liberal copyright rules is The Netherlands.

Downloading copyrighted material for personal use is legal in this country. Even when the downloader knows the supplier is acting against the law (like uploading with P2Pprograms), this does not make him a copyright infringer. In this perspective it seems highly unlikely that downloading from a licensed supplier like Allofmp3 will be declared illegal.

It is safe to say that Dutch citizens can legally use the Russian music services.

Strict copyright legislation

Now for the country that may well have the strictest rules on copyrights, the USA. A thread in the Fatwallet forums brings some light in his confusing subject. We will not bother you with all the details. Here is a concise version of the interesting parts:

*“MP3's, OGG's, etc are not illegal in the USA and therefore can be imported. There is also no law against importing music from other countries (including Russia). Because you are buying this legally in Russia and then importing to the USA, this should be 100% legit. For example, assuming that Russian Vodka is illegal to buy in the USA on Sunday, but you buy the Russian Vodka in Moscow on Sunday, then you import it into the USA, you have done nothing wrong. Again, this assumes that 1) it is illegal to buy Russian Vodka on Sunday in the USA 2) it is legal in Moscow and 3) it is legal to import Russian Vodka.”

Title 17 Chapter 6 Sec. 602 of the U.S. Code covers “Infringing importation of copies or phonorecords”. You can find this title here

Subsection (a) tells us:

*“Importation into the United States, without the authority of the owner of copyright under this title, of copies or phonorecords of a work that have been acquired outside the United States is an infringement of the exclusive right to distribute copies or phonorecords under section 106, actionable under section 501.”

So it's illegal you may think. But take a close look at sub (a)(2):

*“This subsection does not apply to importation, for the private use of the importer and not for distribution, by any person with respect to no more than one copy or phonorecord of any one work at any one time, or by any person arriving from outside the United States with respect to copies or phonorecords forming part of such person's personal baggage;”

If MP3’s, OGG’s etc are in fact considered phonorecords, U.S. citizens can legally buy these as long if they are for private use and not for distribution. If MP3s, OGG’s etc. are not considered phonorecords, no import laws apply. The sections of digital audio recording and sound recording have no mention of importation.

So in layman's terms the bottom line of this discussion is:

*Downloading from Allofmp3 is legal for U.S. Citizens, as long as the files are for private use and not for distribution.

Please note – This is in no way a legal advice. -- please see our disclaimer.

This is what a more law educated person like the Tech Law Advisor has published regarding this issue:

*Additionally, assuming they have legitimate licenses to distribute the music, they probably are restricted to a certain geographic are via their distribution license. The end user wouldn't be violating any laws but the distributor would. If they don't have legitimate distribution licenses then they obviously have no right to distribute at any price. If they claim to have the licenses the end user might be seen as an innocent infringer if not on notice.
Since mp3 is nothing more than an updated music format like a photographic recording, it should be legal and even if it isn't, its the distributor who is at fault, not the downloader.

Its good to check out EFF.org, cause they follow RIAA/MPAA efforts to lobby the government in order to take away our long established fair use laws in the digital age. The distribution/middle man functionality of the RIAA/MPAA serves little purpose in the well connected digital age. They are an obsolete music management model that want to hold on to the money they steal from artists and consumer as long as they can :evil:
 
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Here is what is legal in Canada, the music lobby obviously isn't as strong. This is how it should be:

Can I legally copy music CDs for my friends?

The simple answer is NO, but you can legally copy your friend's music CD for YOUR OWN use.

To paraphrase the introduction to an early Copyright Board ruling:

On March 19, 1998, Part VIII of the Copyright Act came into force. Until then, copying any sound recording for almost any purpose infringed copyright. Part VIII legalizes one such activity: copying of sound recordings of musical works onto recording media for the private use of the person who makes the copy.

It does not matter whether you own the original sound recording (on any medium), you can legally make a copy for your own private use.


To emphasize this point, endnote 4 of an early Copyright Board ruling says:

Section 80 does not legalize (a) copies made for the use of someone other than the person making the copy; and (b) copies of anything else than sound recordings of musical works. It does legalize making a personal copy of a recording owned by someone else.

Note that the Copyright Act ONLY allows for copies to be made of "sound recordings of musical works". Nonmusical works, such as audio books or books-on-tape are NOT covered.

The wording of the Copyright Act gives rise to some very odd situations. In the 6 examples below, "commercial CD" means a commercially pressed CD that you would normally buy at a retail store.

1. If someone steals a commercial CD, steals a blank CD-R, and then copies the commercial CD onto the CD-R, they are a thief, but they have not infringed copyright.
2. You can legally lend a commercial CD to a friend, give him a blank CD-R, let him use your computer, and help him burn the CD-R which he can keep for his own private use.
3. You can legally copy a commercial CD , keep the copy, and give your friend the original.
4. You cannot legally make the copy yourself and give your friend the copy.
5. Your friends Alice and Benoit really like the new commercial CD you just purchased. Alice borrows it and makes a copy for her own use. She then passes the commercial CD on to Benoit, who makes a copy for his own use. Benoit gives the commercial CD back to you. This is all perfectly legal.
6. However, if Alice had copied the commercial CD, given it back to you, and passed her copy on to Benoit to make a copy for his own use, then copyright would have "probably" been infringed. There is some doubt here because Alice's original intent is important. In the strictest terms, her copy was no longer just for her private use. Pretty strange considering that the end result of examples 5 and 6 are exactly the same!
So in these examples you can make copies of your friends CDs. CDs are wav files. MP3s are coverted from wav files. CDs are storage media just like a hard drive is, only its WORM. When you go on a Internet and connect to your friends computer and copy his music, he is not making the copy for you, you are selecting the music to be copied using VERY LONG wired/wireless copying machine so in reality you are not doing anything different than the legal activity of copying a friend's music. The only key legal distinction is that you would have to make sure your friend on the Internet owned the commercial content he converted to mp3 to be made available on the Internet even though the end result would not be any different if you were copying his copy and didn't know you should have gone and hit his friend's computer who really has a legal copy of the content you want to copy legally.

To me it sounds like in Canada P2P can be legal as it can fit the legal definition above...

Here is a more complete FAQ on the Canadian CD levy (also covers digital devices). It seems some sort of change must be made to include P2P, as its just new techology to share information - a new worldwide archive/library medium...
 
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Although I am not lobbying for the RIAA by any means here, I do have some strong moral questions before you take this any farther.

1) If you were the intellectual creator of something, whether it be music, websites, photographs, software, books, or anything else, would you not feel taht you were due the compensation that you asked for or are rightfully due?

2) Is it not theft/pricay to take this intellectual property and sell it for for your profit without giving the proper dues to those who created it?

In our society, we need money to live. By saying that these people who create these intellectual properties are not due their share of the money is like saying they are not due the right to live on an equal level. They manufacture this good. Just like Nikon builds a camera, a photographer builds an image. They spend time and money to craft the image to the best possible. At this point it is their right, as a human, to be able to ask for compensation or not. To deny that person compensation for their product is to take the bread from their mouth. I don't know what you do for a living, but how would you like it if you were no longer paid for what you do? That is essentially what you are doing.

Now I don't agree with the pricing on any of this. It is unfair to both the artist and the end consumer. However, that is the system of which our music industry has been aligned. You can choose to live with it, live without it, listen to only radio or other free music services, or come up with another distribution/music production service that makes sure all apropriate parties are included.

At this point, I have presented a basic moral argument, that in my opinion has presented itself in a way beyond law to human morality itself. You may choose to hang to the law, and then we can argue till we are blue in the face. But really, it is a morallity choice. You choose yours, I will choose mine.

And I apologize to Mensa for hi-jacking his thread. Sorry man. Oh, and interesting find on the Canadian law.
 
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Amd to answer Mensa, iTunes. Its simple, integrated with my iPod/MP3 player. The DRM is the most annoying thing known to man, well, next to Microsofts DRM and movies made by the Wyann Brothers (sp?).
 
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My last post on it too.

I haven't bought/downloaded/whatever any music in a long time - I just listen to Internet radio/real radio.

As far as morals go, the only people who are important in my mind are the artists who created the music and the consumers who enjoy it. The greedy middleman who steal from both offers little to no value with the Internet and other technologies in place these days. What makes them any better when they dupe the artists into signing contracts they never read that take all the money they deserve?

What makes the recording industry special compared to something comparable like the publishing industry? Do you see them (or authors) lobbying congress to ban public libraries so people can't borrow and enjoy books instead of buying their own copies :roll:

As far as your 2) in Russia the laws are different - they favor the consumer and it is not theft according to the law. Again I refer to my library example too - you don't see publishing companies wanting libraries banned or photocopiers removed from libraries.

Piracy will never be a big enough issue to prevent music artists/publishing companies from earning a living. Its too much work and has not killed off other industries that face it. Music sales went up the years when the recording industry was lobbying saying it was killing them - they are just greedy bastards.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well guys. Reading your post aroused my interest and I went to allofmp3.com. I've downloaded for pennies two classics MP3. Miles Davis "Bitches Brew" and "Vital Tech" Tones with Scott Henderson on Guitar (X original Return to Forever), Steve "Machine Gun" Smith (X Journey Drummer), Victor W. on Bass. For those of you who follow Jazz Fusion music, know what I'm talking about. The Miles Davis is a classic. Both downloads were for less then $5.00 :thumbs_up: You know what? I'm going in for more. :egad:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Come on guys, for more or less 15 cents a cut from Chris Botti latest CD "To Love Again". you can't go wrong. The quality of the MP3 is outstanding, the prices of excellent music is better then I've seen on the net from all the leading MP3 sites. It has a large variety of music FROM AROUND THE WORLD. You guessed it, "More"
 

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You can't beat the price. My son's 15 and every now and then will give me a list of a few songs and ask me to "get" them for him if I would please. I laugh and tell him that when I was young(er) we used to save our pennies and buy these things called records or cassettes. Sometimes we'd even keep a blank tape in the recorder and snag a song off the radio, hoping the DJ wouldn't talk before the song was over and screw things up. :lol: Now we just click the mouse a few times and build our own CD's without leaving the house. Funny thing is, everybody taped off the radio but nobody spoke of legalities back then.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
toyrav said:
You can't beat the price. My son's 15 and every now and then will give me a list of a few songs and ask me to "get" them for him if I would please. I laugh and tell him that when I was young(er) we used to save our pennies and buy these things called records or cassettes. Sometimes we'd even keep a blank tape in the recorder and snag a song off the radio, hoping the DJ wouldn't talk before the song was over and screw things up. :lol: Now we just click the mouse a few times and build our own CD's without leaving the house. Funny thing is, everybody taped off the radio but nobody spoke of legalities back then.
True, very true. When I was in high school and my freshman years I did that a lot with the radio. They always spoke before, and at the end. Ah. Right now I'm downloading Tribal Tech. A Jazz/Fusion group. Also some Smooth Jazz to listen this week.

Spring break is on this week so I guess Tijuana, El Paso, and Miami must be on the brink of insanity. :wink: :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm hooked :!: I've downloaded some very hard to find music, for 20.00. I've downloaded 11 albums in high quality CD Sound!

Miles Davis (Bitches Brew!) 6 files
Cafe Del Mar 28 files
Scott Henderson, Steve Smith, Victor Wooten! 9 files
Chris Botti 13 files
Tommy Emmanuel 10 files
Tribal Tech! 10 files
Russ Freeman 10 files
The Future of Jazz 26 Files
Spyro Gyra The very best of..." 16 files
Santana 11 files
Howard Levy, Jerry Goodman, Steve Smith, Oteil Burbri!! 10 files

That's about 7.5 cents a song. Not bad, not bad a t all. :wink:
 

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I've used allofmp3 for a few years now.

I always get 192 bit rate and its 2cents a Mb. I've spent about 75 bucks through that site and have gigabytes of music compared to 75 songs for the same amount of money through napster.
 
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