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My wife just took her rav4 in for an oil change. The dealer was recommending a “spark plug change and EFI service” for $329 bucks. Any idea what they do for EFI service and why its so expensive. Vehicle is running fine and just went in for an oil change. Vehicle is a 2010 rav4 sport with a 4 cylinder. I have attached a photo of the recommendation made on the bottom of her receipt. Thanks in advance. :)
 

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Your Humble Administrator
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Yeah, it's fuel injector cleaning--they often try that one on me. I tell them it's running like a top, why does it need fuel injector cleaning? I would check out that brake caliper, though.
 

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spark plugs change and fuel injector cleaning, what's the mileage?
 

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The spark plugs will easily go 100,000 miles - and cost about $10 each. Maybe take 1/2 hour to change all four. "EFI service" is total BS!
The injector cleaner does nothing, for you that is.
The transmission fluid is supposedly lifetime.

What's sad and deceptive is they throw all these unneeded upsells in with the only serious one, the rear brake. Also be nice if they knew how to spell "seizing."
That work does need to be done but I'd get an estimate from an independent shop. Might cost me $50 DIY.
 

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I have a 2016 RAV4 but I also have a 2003 Corolla with 261,000 km and it runs like a charm with original spark plugs and never had the injectors cleaned. Oil changes were just once a year averaging 18000 km per year. Oil is 5w30. I once had a 85 Toyota truck and got the injectors cleaned at around 200,000 km and didn't see any change.
 

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.....most of them.:serious

My experience as well. The only time I've taken my RAV for service after Toyota Care expired and there was no upsell attempt is when I took it to an independent service facility for an oil and filter change.
 

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I'm an older guy who is hugely skeptical, and informed of these scams to promote unnecessary repairs, and in my fifty years of driving and service experiences I am very happy to report a respite from dealership misbehavior - Dahl Toyota, Winona, Minnesota has been 100% upfront all the time.

I have no relationship with Dahl Toyota except as an ordinary customer.

Dahl is huge with many makes of autos, American and Asian. He has built his enterprise and still fosters his own honesty all the way to his maintenance people. He is a premier leader. My opinion, of course.
 

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My wife just took her rav4 in for an oil change. The dealer was recommending a “spark plug change and EFI service” for $329 bucks.........
$ealership Mathematics:
a) often wive's and FM's (in general) are typically an easier up-sell / based on jewelry worn (LOL)
b) office men with an expensive suit &/or wearing Italian leather shoes are easier targets, that a blue collar guy wearing blue jeans, with dirt under his fingernails
c) older customers that talk the auto talk & walk the repair procedure walk, with the Service Adviser...rarely get Scammed

^^ Projection of Vehicle knowledge &/or Lingo or a lack there of...dictates the $$ outcome.

PS - My wife is smart mechanically and fully understands the main components of a vehicle.
- before we got the Gen3 RAV4, her Volvo wagon had a fast blinking blinker
- she call Volvo Dealership for a bulb socket pigtail
- they tried selling her a $1,000 wiring harness plus 8 hours labor to change
- wife had the blinker fixed for free, her car problem was used as a training aid
^^ Took 15 minutes repair time vs $2,000 Dealership quote.
 

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I certainly don't trust the Toyota dealer by me since they tried to upsell the cabin filter ($50 for them to do) and tried to take advantage of several older people while I was there. I go to a smaller ma & pa shop in town by me for oil changes and tire rotation and do trust them for that.
 

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If anyone has 22 minutes, you might enjoy watching this CBC Marketplace episode which includes hidden camera videos of car dealerships selling unneeded maintenance services.

https://youtu.be/jBpMe36GoW0?t=1
So basically follow the owners manual maintenance and don't listen to them...
 

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I certainly don't trust the Toyota dealer by me since they tried to upsell the cabin filter ($50 for them to do) and tried to take advantage of several older people while I was there. I go to a smaller ma & pa shop in town by me for oil changes and tire rotation and do trust them for that.
^^ Same here.
I have one 2 man shop for oil changes - I supply Pennzoil Ultra & Wix XP filter.
- labor charge is $15
Other shop is owned my a good friend of mine - for brakes & tire rotations, and general repairs.
- my repair costs are well under half what Dealership charges

Our son gets the up-sell treatment with his new Lexus RX350, but he co-owns an "IT" company and often dressed up in business attire. When the service adviser gives him the sales pitch, son promptly calls Dad's cell phone, and I advise him accordingly.
 

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90,000 miles. I'm doing the brakes this weekend, picked up parts today.
When you get in there to check those pads, I'd bet that its just the caliper pins sticking some, or maybe the boots failed and dirt got inside by the pins...assuming they are telling the truth and there really is a significant sticking even occurring. You can get the boots and pins for much cheaper as an aftermarket item. I recently had to replace the boots on my '00, and Toyota wanted $11 PER boot, and $13 PER pin: I love Toyota parts, but I just couldn't get myself to spend $48 for pins and boots for ONE caliper. I found a good kit at Advance Auto that was less than half the price, and of a good quality.

I think its unlikely that you "may require new caliper and rotor"! The original Toyota rotors on my '00 lasted 155K miles and 14 years, and they still had life on them, but were just a little too thin to be re-surfaced when I needed to replace the pads, so I just replaced them. At worst, you might decide to get your rotors re-surfaced for $10 at O'Reilly's, or something, but let's hope they were just bluffing.

If you don't have the pink mystery Toyota Rubber Grease (part #08887-01206) for the caliper pins, I recommend that you use Sil-Glyde (from NAPA and other places, https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/BK_7651351).

The reason is because there is a rubber bushing on the lower pin that will swell if the typical "caliper grease" is used on the pin, because regular caliper grease has ingredients that cause rubber to swell. The swollen bushing will cause the pin to stick. Sil-Glyde is safe for these bushings -- I used it for a few years before I managed to get my hands on the elusive pink Rubber Grease, and I never had any issues with it causing swell. You can also use the Sil-Glyde on the pin boots, and on the piston boots.

What does "LRFT" even mean on that quote? These up-selling dealerships and shops make me so mad sometimes. They use fear to try to take people's money. Its not right. I second what everyone else is saying about the "EFI" treatment: get a $6 bottle of Techron or another fuel injector cleaner and pour it into your gas tank the next time you're taking a long drive.

If you have never changed the coolant, it might be a good idea to go ahead and do that, but you don't need to pay $120 for a "flush". The coolant is probably fine, because the 4.3's use the Super Long Life. Since you can only buy that coolant pre-diluted, you unfortunately can't use the drain-refill-drain-refill-etc-with-distilled-water method because you won't get the correct concentration restored by mixing the pre-diluted coolant via the radiator volume with the distilled water volume that would still be in the block. BUT, you can simply re-fresh the coolant by just draining whatever comes out of the radiator, then re-filling with the same amount, bleeding the air out, and closing it up. No distilled water needed, and you can just do this a couple of times and have almost all-new coolant for the price of a couple jugs of Super Long Life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
When you get in there to check those pads, I'd bet that its just the caliper pins sticking some, or maybe the boots failed and dirt got inside by the pins...assuming they are telling the truth and there really is a significant sticking even occurring. You can get the boots and pins for much cheaper as an aftermarket item. I recently had to replace the boots on my '00, and Toyota wanted $11 PER boot, and $13 PER pin: I love Toyota parts, but I just couldn't get myself to spend $48 for pins and boots for ONE caliper. I found a good kit at Advance Auto that was less than half the price, and of a good quality.

I think its unlikely that you "may require new caliper and rotor"! The original Toyota rotors on my '00 lasted 155K miles and 14 years, and they still had life on them, but were just a little too thin to be re-surfaced when I needed to replace the pads, so I just replaced them. At worst, you might decide to get your rotors re-surfaced for $10 at O'Reilly's, or something, but let's hope they were just bluffing.

If you don't have the pink mystery Toyota Rubber Grease (part #08887-01206) for the caliper pins, I recommend that you use Sil-Glyde (from NAPA and other places.

The reason is because there is a rubber bushing on the lower pin that will swell if the typical "caliper grease" is used on the pin, because regular caliper grease has ingredients that cause rubber to swell. The swollen bushing will cause the pin to stick. Sil-Glyde is safe for these bushings -- I used it for a few years before I managed to get my hands on the elusive pink Rubber Grease, and I never had any issues with it causing swell. You can also use the Sil-Glyde on the pin boots, and on the piston boots.

What does "LRFT" even mean on that quote? These up-selling dealerships and shops make me so mad sometimes. They use fear to try to take people's money. Its not right. I second what everyone else is saying about the "EFI" treatment: get a $6 bottle of Techron or another fuel injector cleaner and pour it into your gas tank the next time you're taking a long drive.

If you have never changed the coolant, it might be a good idea to go ahead and do that, but you don't need to pay $120 for a "flush". The coolant is probably fine, because the 4.3's use the Super Long Life. Since you can only buy that coolant pre-diluted, you unfortunately can't use the drain-refill-drain-refill-etc-with-distilled-water method because you won't get the correct concentration restored by mixing the pre-diluted coolant via the radiator volume with the distilled water volume that would still be in the block. BUT, you can simply re-fresh the coolant by just draining whatever comes out of the radiator, then re-filling with the same amount, bleeding the air out, and closing it up. No distilled water needed, and you can just do this a couple of times and have almost all-new coolant for the price of a couple jugs of Super Long Life.
Thanks for the advice, it all sounds spot on according to other posts I have read. Cheers!
 
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