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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi there, my Name is Peter, living in the lowest and flat part of northern Gemany, so i dont need 4WD. I bought my first RAV4, (4door but 2WD 2003 model) two years ago. I was so happy with it, i bought a second RAV (same version) last year for my wife. We made many voyages, specially into the scotish Highlands, without any trouble.
Only the left frontbrake caliper has to be changed and naturaly the exhausts are rusty.

Peter
 

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Welcome, Peter! Did you have any problems because of having to drive on the left-hand side of the roads in the U.K?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
left hand drive

No problems to drive on the left side, only overtaking is a little bit difficult. (Mostly we have been on single-track roads):surprise
 

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It is good to hear that you had no difficulty driving on the left side. When we moved from the U.S. to the U.K. it took me some time to getting used to driving on the left side, but we had a lot of single-track roads in Wales as well!:smile
 

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It is good to hear that you had no difficulty driving on the left side. When we moved from the U.S. to the U.K. it took me some time to getting used to driving on the left side, but we had a lot of single-track roads in Wales as well!:smile
I was living in England in 1967 when all of Sweden switched from driving on the left to the right all at once in one day! They did it!

Very many of the cars in Sweden were already left-hand drive just like ours in part because bordering countries drove on the right side. One subtle thing that caught me by surprise was the re-aiming of headlights to bias the right.

Welcome Peter!
 

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I was living in England in 1967 when all of Sweden switched from driving on the left to the right all at once in one day! They did it!

Very many of the cars in Sweden were already left-hand drive just like ours in part because bordering countries drove on the right side. One subtle thing that caught me by surprise was the re-aiming of headlights to bias the right.

Yes, I remember that event well! There was quite a lot of U.S. news TV coverage of that switchover day in Sweden and of how well it went!


Now if we in the U.S. could have a switchover day to convert completely from our archaic measurement system to the metric system and join the rest of the world.
 

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Now if we in the U.S. could have a switchover day to convert completely from our archaic measurement system to the metric system and join the rest of the world.
I thought so too until my carpenter FIL explained how easy our fractions are to work with. Divide 3/4" by 2 = 3/8" easy! And halves, quarter, eights and sixteenths are all on the rulers.
 

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I thought so too until my carpenter FIL explained how easy our fractions are to work with. Divide 3/4" by 2 = 3/8" easy! And halves, quarter, eights and sixteenths are all on the rulers.

The metric system based upon 10s and parts of tens as is our numerical system, and the logical naming of measures and is much easier to teach to children in school. When one becomes used to it as we had it in Europe it is much easer to work with. With metrics there isn't the difficulty of how many feet It takes to make up a mile - a kilometer logically is 1000 meters. The other side of most U.S. rulers is metric, involves finer increments, and is what I use for most work. Also volume measures are much easier to teach and learn since there isn't the problem of pecks and bushels and how many pecks make up a bushel, etc. Nearly 7 billion people use the metric system - the U.S. is the major holdout, and as I understand it are such stellar industrialised (?)countries as Liberia and Myanmar.
 
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