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Hi all, bought my first ever RAV4 XT3, it's a 2004 with 100,000 on the clock and so far quite pleased with it, it's done just over 100,000 miles and drives well, aside from a little steering wobble at 70mph, increasing for every couple of mph above.

Have found one thread suggesting swapping rear and front wheels, will try that on Monday and give it another squirt on the motorway.:) Will tag onto that old thread once retested.:)

Have already found some helpful (to a new owner) advice in other threads, looking forward to finding out more.:)
 

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Welcome! Front wheel wobble may be caused by the wheels needing to be balanced, or perhaps by an out-of-round tire. Suggest that it be diagnosed and remedied since continued wobble will cause increased wear in steering components.
 
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Thanks, yes, will be down at the tyre place tomorrow afternoon, to check them out, only picked it up yesterday, so early days.

Incidentally, is there an issue on a FWD if I put new tyres on the front, but still have much more worn tyres on the back?
 

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2008 RAV4 Limited V6
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Thanks, yes, will be down at the tyre place tomorrow afternoon, to check them out, only picked it up yesterday, so early days.

Incidentally, is there an issue on a FWD if I put new tyres on the front, but still have much more worn tyres on the back?
Back in the day, consensus was that you should put the tires with the best tread on the driven wheels, front for FWD, and rear for RWD. Nowadays, it seems the tire manufacturers are saying that the best tires should be put on the rear regardless. The logic is the rear tires are more important in preventing skidding.
 

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Back in the day, consensus was that you should put the tires with the best tread on the driven wheels, front for FWD, and rear for RWD. Nowadays, it seems the tire manufacturers are saying that the best tires should be put on the rear regardless. The logic is the rear tires are more important in preventing skidding.
I can see why that may be the case, but in this case all of the tyres are nearing end of life, the rear less so than the front and given that the front tyres generally wear more quickly, being the steering wheels, thought to put the new ones on the front if it turns out I require new.

The question was more whether the FWD system would become unbalanced with tyres on one axle having significantly more tread than those on the other axle.
 

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I can see why that may be the case, but in this case all of the tyres are nearing end of life, the rear less so than the front and given that the front tyres generally wear more quickly, being the steering wheels, thought to put the new ones on the front if it turns out I require new.

The question was more whether the FWD system would become unbalanced with tyres on one axle having significantly more tread than those on the other axle.

Are the wheels/tires rotated regularly? Doing that will result in the tires wearing evenly especially in a FWD vehicle since the tires which move the vehicle wear more quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Are the wheels/tires rotated regularly? Doing that will result in the tires wearing evenly especially in a FWD vehicle since the tires which move the vehicle wear more quickly.
Probably not, but as per earlier post, I only acquired the vehicle yesterday and can't really answer that, so the question still is whether having a set of tyres on one axle which have significabntly more tread than on the other (if I have two new tyres fitted) will cause problems.
 
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