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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Folks,
My Rav is consuming more oil as time passes. It used to be 3/4 of a litre of oil for 5000 kms, but I am not sitting around 1-2 litres per 5000 kms. I have also noticed the muffler outlet is black, similar to what you would fine on a diesel. I have never noticed any visible smoke exiting the exhaust, but it does seem to be happening. I changed the weight of my oil from 5w30 to 10w30 to see if that would have an effect. no luck. Any ideas? Valve Seals/ piston rings? No noticible loss in power or mileage.

Thanks

Brent
 

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How many miles do you have on your RAV4? Well, I'll hit 60,000 very soon and I have a 1997 3SFE. These engines, with proper care, are very good. I still use 5W-30, but I also use Lucas Oil Stabalizer. It's something like an STP, but not that thick. Before doing that, flush the engine when you change your oil with motor flush. Use three of Castrol 5W-30, and one quart of Lucas. Warm the engine in the moning so that the rings have a chance to expand and seal. If it still smokes, your looking at a engine re-ring. Oil and a 3,000 to 4,500 mile [MAX] change is so important for these engines.

Those 60,000 are hard miles on my engine. Now, that I've installed a Header and made some more performance mods, the engine is responding like a tank. I guess my pampering of the engine is paying off.
 
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I am currently sitting with 110,000 kms(60-70k miles) on my second engine. The first engine blew at 87000 kms due to a defective oil pressure switch and Toyota would not honor it as It was 6 months over the 5 year mark.
 
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yeah yeah ... all this talk of oil is lovely -

but, the only way you are going to find out if you have a problem (assuming there isn't a big puddle on the drive) is you need to compression test the cylinders - then if one is low you have to leakdown to isolate the problem

The ammount you are indicating could be a major problem - valve guides, piston rings (do you have a lot of oil in the intake pipe?)
 
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I can run a compression test. Couple of questions.
1. Should compression test be run with engine warmed up or cool?
2. What is the acceptable PSI per cyl?

Thanks

Brent
 

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I guess the engine should be at normal operating temprature. It is cold just for about a couple of minutes or so. From their on, it's alway runs hot. Especially toyota engine that run a lot better hot instead of warm. Let me see what the Haynes says regarding PSI for the 3SFe engine. OK here I what exactly what it says [Source Toyota RAV4 1996 thru 2002 HAYNES Repair Manual]

3. Cylinder compression check

1 A Compression check will tell you what ; mechanical condition the upper end of your engine (pistons, rings, valves, head gaskets) is in. Specifically, it can tell you if the compression is due to leakage caused by worn pistons. rings, defective valves and seats or a blown head gasket. Note: The engine must be aerating temperature and the battery fully charged for this check.

2. Begin by cleaning the area around the
spark plugs before you remove them (corn-pressed air should be used, if available). The idea is to prevent dirt from getting into the cylinder as the compression check is being done.

3. Remove all of the spark plugs from the engine.

4. Block the throttle wide open.

5. Disable the ignition system by discon-necting the primary (low voltage) electrical connectors from the coil packs The fuel pump circuit should also be disabled (see Chapter 4).

6. Install the compression gauge in the spark plug hole.

7. Crank the engine over at least seven compression strokes and watch the gauge. The compression should build up quickly in a healthy engine. Low compression on the first stroke, followed by gradually increasing pres¬sure on successive strokes, indicates worn piston rings. A low compression reading on the first stroke, which doesn't build up during successive strokes, indicates leaking valves or a blown head gasket (a cracked head could also be the cause). Deposits on the undersides of the valve heads can also cause low compression. Record the highest gauge reading obtained.

8 Repeat the procedure for the remaining cylinders and compare the results to this Chapter's Specifications.

9 Add some engine oil (about three squirts from a plunger-type oil can) to each cylinder, through the spark plug hole, and repeat the test.

10 If the compression increases after the oil is added, the piston rings are definitely worn. If the compression doesn't increase signifi¬cantly, the leakage is occurring at the valves or head gasket. Leakage past the valves may be caused by burned valve seats and/or faces or warped, cracked or bent valves.

11 If two adjacent cylinders have equally low compression, there's a strong possibility that the head gasket between them is blown. The appearance of coolant in the combustion chambers or the crankcase would verify this condition.

12 If one cylinder is slightly lower than the others, and the engine has a slightly rough idle, a worn lobe on the camshaft could be the cause.

13 If the compression is unusually high, the combustion chambers are probably coated with carbon deposits. If that's the case, the cylinder head(s) should be removed and decarbonized.

14 If compression is way down or varies greatly between cylinders, it would be a good idea to have a leak-down test performed by an automotive repair shop. This test will pinpoint exactly where the leakage is occurring and how severe it is.

15 After all of the cylinders have been checked, unblock the throttle and restore the ignition and fuel system functions.


Hope this helps :wink:
 
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Discussion Starter #9
techno_farmer said:
2. What is the acceptable PSI per cyl?

Thanks

Brent
It's not a presision measuring thing - you'll know if something is wrong. For example all will say be at the same figure between 150 and 200 psi (I say this because I think the book says 183 psi - but some have perfectly healthy engines that read 210 ... some 150)

If theres a problem one may be at 100 or less ... adding a bit of oil to the cylinder is used as a diagnostic. If pressure improves it indicates rings/positons - if it doesn't then something with the head or head-gasket.

A rough and ready way to check the enging is take the oil cap off - if there is slight suction keeps pulling the cap back on - this is good .... If the cap gets pushed off - or there is a lot of pressure blowing out (and some little bits of smoke) - you have problems
 
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Hello All,

Well my mechanic, who I trust, took a look and sure enough I need to rebuild my engine. Quite a bit of blowback at the oil cap, burnt oil on the taile pipe, etc, etc. What would you folks recommend, rebuilinding the engine, or finding one already rebuilt. This one only has 100,000 kms, around 60k miles.

Cheers

Brent
 

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The only way that I would install a new engine. Is that I rebuild it. Buying a [so called] rebuild engine from a stranger, even a friend is a No Go. They will look for a way to install cheap, warned parts.

Once I learned from this dude who thought he bought a new engine. It even had a one month guarantee. Nice black painted block, polished head cover, new plug wires. After five weeks, it blows a barring. When he opens it, it had gear box oil in it. With is gear lube it will work fine, for about a month. After that the engine will destroy itself. Each and every part in it was old or warned out. When they went to the seller, he pulled out the four weeks warranty, and time was up. :roll:

Don't fall a victim, do it right way. Rebuild the engine yourself. If you go to a salvage yard, open it at home and check it.

Or, if you have the resource$, go to a Toyota dealer and buy a crate engine.
 
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I don't mean to be a fatalist - but, if you're gonna pay some-one to do it - it probably means the cars effectively a write off cos of the cost.

You could live with it using oil.

You could do the job yourself - but be warned - it's not easy ... in theory a RAV engine needs to be dropped out of the bottom. I'm doing a 4WD celica at the moment and it took me 12 hours to pull the engine - which is Toyota book time ... how people do it in 90 minutes I'll never know.

As for for the actual engine - it is likely that you may get away with changing the rings but really you should probably be looking at a re-bore and oversize pistons and rings.

You can buy something called a short block which basically includes the block, pistons, rings and crank built up (from Toyota) and you bolt the rest of your stuff to it. They cost about $1200

I'd also seriously consider an engine out of a car that is being broken that has a provable mileage - say a car written off in an accident with a genuine low mileage - proved through service history
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Im having a similar sort of issue at the moment. Imported a 94 SWB Rav from japan, had OLD balck oil in it so I decided to do a good service. I already new it had an oil leak from the camshaft but the cambelt is due to be done so I decided to tackle it when we do that.

I did an engine flush, drained it all out, new filter, some Magnatec & Lucas oil stabilizer, & some stuff to quieten down the tappets etc.

Seems to be leaking a tad more with the thinner oil however I think all the GUNK that came off has block up the system and we got an oil light on the dash :(

Dropped it off last night so hopefully all will be well in a weeks time :)

Cheers
KiwiMR2
 

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techno_farmer said:
Hello All,

Well my mechanic, who I trust, took a look and sure enough I need to rebuild my engine. Quite a bit of blowback at the oil cap, burnt oil on the taile pipe, etc, etc. What would you folks recommend, rebuilinding the engine, or finding one already rebuilt. This one only has 100,000 kms, around 60k miles.

Cheers

Brent

So what was the exact problem?

Mine is similar..........no leaks, no smoke, but seems to use a fair bit of oil :?
 
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