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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have heard that the 2022 RAV4 goes back to 2019 model with some updates (or not... hello dependent cable apple play).

Starting with 2019 Rav 4 Hybrid, please share the mechanical problems or other things that had to be replaced or fixed since you have owned the car. Was the problem covered by Toyota care 36K/3yr plan?

Thanks
 

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2021 RAV4 XLE Premium Hybrid
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I have had zero problems with my '21 RAV4 hybrid. Thanks to others on this forum, I have printed out every applicable T-SB for my car and shown them to the dealer. None of them needed attention.
 

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NC '19 Rav4 Hybrid Limited, Entune 3.0, Adaptive Headlights, Advanced Technology Package
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2019 Rav4 Hybrid Limited with 3 packages so as complex as it gets. Fuel fill sensor/tank error replaced in 2020 under warranty. No other issues 24k miles.
 

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In this case HV is high voltage . See thread
High voltage big corrosion problem.
In a nutshell . There is an electrical connector to the rear motor that has a clamp that rusts and the whole harness has to be replaced 5-7k$
Proper extra maintenance can prevent it. Possibly Toyota recall coming but some people paid a full price on this harness
If mine breaks I will wrap the shielding under a screw as a quick fix .
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
In this case HV is high voltage . See thread
High voltage big corrosion problem.
In a nutshell . There is an electrical connector to the rear motor that has a clamp that rusts and the whole harness has to be replaced 5-7k$
Proper extra maintenance can prevent it. Possibly Toyota recall coming but some people paid a full price on this harness
If mine breaks I will wrap the shielding under a screw as a quick fix .
Thank you for this concern. I called my local dealer and they said there was a recall on this issue around July 2022. They said they replaced the clamp that corrodes with stainless steel material. Since I got my car in Aug, she assured me that my new car would have SS clamp. I will have it checked to make sure.
 

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A TSB is released whenever one is developed.

It's basically that if you are Toyota and found a problem like "left front wheels comes loose". You then come up with a fix. At that point you issue a TSB. A TSB is generally something you can choose to have performed or not.
If you check your wheels weekly and they have never been loose, then you may decide "Nah, not going in for this TSB because my wheels are always tight".

I am too new to Toyota and the Hybrid to know if the cable corrosion is/was a TSB. I think it was. Basically that means Toyota has recognized a problem exists, came up with a solution and issued a TSB. A scenario, I live in California where it is pretty dry and my car isn't driven in salty road conditions for 4 months of winter annually. My connector may never corrode, I could decide not to go in for the TSB because I fill comfortable that I won't experience the problem.
Other situations, a TSB may not be performed if the vehicle does not have symptoms.
For example, Ford has a TSB for something related to the 4x4 system on some trucks. If I went it for a problem, they would perform the TSB. If I never have a problem, my truck would never have the TSB done because it was an unnecessary repair.


As for finding them, I don't know of an actual resource aside from Google. Just have to search for them to see what TSB's pop up.

I've never seen TSB hyphenated aside form this thread. I assume it is Technical Service Bulletin, not Technical-Service Bulletin.
 

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Do you know how to get a print out on the T-SB? Do they come out monthly?

Thanks
pay for a login to techinfo.toyota.com, 20 bucks minimum, 2 days access (or you can pay for more)



all manuals, all TSB's, pretty much all possible documentation, service guides, troubleshooting procedures, repair, teardown
-every thing- for all Toyotas for almost any year. this is what all Toyota techs use for info.


as a new person to toyota it is worth it to pay for the 2 days access and drill in and see what you can find. then you'll
know where the -real- Toyota published answers are for everything. when a new TSB comes out, it goes here first.
 

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2021 RAV4 XLE Premium Hybrid
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A TSB is released whenever one is developed.

It's basically that if you are Toyota and found a problem like "left front wheels comes loose". You then come up with a fix. At that point you issue a TSB. A TSB is generally something you can choose to have performed or not.
If you check your wheels weekly and they have never been loose, then you may decide "Nah, not going in for this TSB because my wheels are always tight".

I am too new to Toyota and the Hybrid to know if the cable corrosion is/was a TSB. I think it was. Basically that means Toyota has recognized a problem exists, came up with a solution and issued a TSB. A scenario, I live in California where it is pretty dry and my car isn't driven in salty road conditions for 4 months of winter annually. My connector may never corrode, I could decide not to go in for the TSB because I fill comfortable that I won't experience the problem.
Other situations, a TSB may not be performed if the vehicle does not have symptoms.
For example, Ford has a TSB for something related to the 4x4 system on some trucks. If I went it for a problem, they would perform the TSB. If I never have a problem, my truck would never have the TSB done because it was an unnecessary repair.


As for finding them, I don't know of an actual resource aside from Google. Just have to search for them to see what TSB's pop up.

I've never seen TSB hyphenated aside form this thread. I assume it is Technical Service Bulletin, not Technical-Service Bulletin.
1. All Toyota T-SB can be found on the NHTSA (National Traffic Highway Safety Administration) web site since Toyota is required to make them public. Finding a particular one on NHTSA is almost impossible unless you have the T-SB number. There is no way that I know of to find them using subject matter. It may also take some time for them to show up there (government bureaucracy what it is).

2. I have a folder for all the T-SB I have found that apply to my RAV4, and all T-SB numbers I have seen include a dash. That is why I always include a dash. For example: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2021/MC-10188912-9999.pdf Note that the dash is included and the info is from the NHTSA web site,

3. From the pictures I have seen of the cable corrosion problem, it is my understanding that the steel mesh inside the sleeve that is corroding, not the outside clamp. The mesh is there to reduce radio frequency emissions due to the high powered, high frequency power to the AC synchronous motors. (Radio frequency emissions can cause interference on AM and other radios). When the mesh is gone, the ground from one end of the cable to the other is gone and the car detects that and sends an error code.

It is my opinion (note: opinion) that Toyota should have made that mesh from stainless steel, then they would not have had this problem (I have stainless steel mesh brake lines on my 50 year old Porsche that are still hanging in there). As it is, to replace the whole cable from the front of the car to back traction motor is going to very expensive. Cleaning and applying a sealant is only tempory and probably just cosmetic.
 

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I lose track with other recalls on other vehicles but I think we have had three.

The first was the infamous fuel tank issue which affected tens of thousands of 2019 hybrids and extended into 2020 models--with lawsuits started and pages and pages of frustrated owner posts on sites like this--until they mostly fixed the issue (ours does not always seem to get full advertised range or tank fills yet but is a LOT better).

We had a suspension recall --lower control arm,and most recently another recall that I think was a steering column one but might be wrong.

They have also had recalls on water getting into the steering box cover and causing a potential loss of electronic assisted power steering and cracks in the engine casting.

Toyota isn't as bad as Honda but both have had their former reps tarnished by a lot of problems in their new vehicles lately.

I am rethinking my old rule--which I violated with the 19 Rav Hybrid and paid the price for--of not buying a brand new redesign in a model and waiting a year--should be extended to two or more years.

Even Toyota can't send new designs out without lots of recalls.
 

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1. All Toyota T-SB can be found on the NHTSA (National Traffic Highway Safety Administration) web site since Toyota is required to make them public. Finding a particular one on NHTSA is almost impossible unless you have the T-SB number. There is no way that I know of to find them using subject matter. It may also take some time for them to show up there (government bureaucracy what it is).

2. I have a folder for all the T-SB I have found that apply to my RAV4, and all T-SB numbers I have seen include a dash. That is why I always include a dash. For example: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2021/MC-10188912-9999.pdf Note that the dash is included and the info is from the NHTSA web site,

3. From the pictures I have seen of the cable corrosion problem, it is my understanding that the steel mesh inside the sleeve that is corroding, not the outside clamp. The mesh is there to reduce radio frequency emissions due to the high powered, high frequency power to the AC synchronous motors. (Radio frequency emissions can cause interference on AM and other radios). When the mesh is gone, the ground from one end of the cable to the other is gone and the car detects that and sends an error code.

It is my opinion (note: opinion) that Toyota should have made that mesh from stainless steel, then they would not have had this problem (I have stainless steel mesh brake lines on my 50 year old Porsche that are still hanging in there). As it is, to replace the whole cable from the front of the car to back traction motor is going to very expensive. Cleaning and applying a sealant is only tempory and probably just cosmetic.
That is true of recalls but if they have discovered a problem, have a fix or diagnosis approach, it may be in a T-SB or a TT (Tech Tip) and you only get those via the techinfo web site unless someone has snagged them and posts them here as often happens.
 

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Thank you for this concern. I called my local dealer and they said there was a recall on this issue around July 2022. They said they replaced the clamp that corrodes with stainless steel material. Since I got my car in Aug, she assured me that my new car would have SS clamp. I will have it checked to make sure.
To be clear you mention that you where told they now use "stainless steel material" as part of the fix, there was a "recall" 🤔
 
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