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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone know of any good turkey basters that can fit in the power steering reservoir? I would need to order it off of Amazon.
Can you also tell me how I can fix the rear Suspension Bump Stops, (they are currently bouncing around in the springs)
Thanks,
rav4 1
 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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I did the flush on mine that LugNut is talking about, it's the only way to actually change the fluid because there is more fluid in the rest of the system than what's in the reservoir.
It's easier to do with 2 people so that one can turn the steering wheel and the other can keep the reservoir full. Don't let it run low on fluid.

When finished you may need to purge the air out of the system, if you let it get too low or if the power steering pump is making noise. Crank the car and slowly turn it from stop to stop. Check the reservoir, if you need to add fluid do so don't let it go down too much. Repeat several times, if the pump was making noise because of air in the system it should be quiet now.

In the video he inserts an extension hose inside the power steering return line which is okay but you can also use barbed hose fittings if you cannot get this to work.


 

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1999 Toyota RAV4 with 3MZ-FE 6 cylinder engine, camo wrap, OME lift, heavily modded
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One other thing, you don't need to put jack stands under the car, you can crank the car up to turn the wheel from stop to stop. Again, it's best to have another person to watch the reservoir and keep it full.

Let us know how it came out.
 

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I just did this on the Green Machine. It took about three quarts, most of which was flushed through. The old fluid didn't look or smell bad, but I'd guess the steering turns slightly easier now.

The fluid moves through so fast during the flush, while the engine is running, that it's not possible to keep the reservoir filled, at least for me working alone. So I only ran the engine for about 30 seconds, three times, while turning the steering stop to stop. After the final fill the new fluid was a bit foamy so the pump was noisy, but after letting it sit (engine off) for a half hour and then topping-off the fluid, it returned to being quiet.
 

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I too just did this for a third time on a Rav4 -- my fluid was about 4 years old and I had the reservoir removed to get to the timing belt, so I flushed it when I put it back together. I have used the same old "turkey baster" from Harbor Freight for all of the jobs. It is a big red one with a red bulb that is about the size of an apple, and a small diameter, long pipe. It also fits in the brake fluid reservoir for when you do a brake fluid flush.

If you can't find a baster that will fit, just get whatever baster you can and insert a smaller diameter piece of tubing into the pipe (you can get tubing at Home Depot, Lowes, or pet stores that have fish equipment). Alternatively, you can just forget about the baster all together and simply empty the reservoir into a container after you disconnect the line. Place something like a large trash bag or old towel over the area below the reservoir to protect the belts from ATF that might spill.

Be careful not to break the bulb feature at the end of the reservoir. The plastic becomes brittle over time. You might find that it takes some force to remove the tubing: be patient to prevent breaking it and remember that the bulb feature is there (don’t use a channel-locks or pliers without considering this). If you find the end of the hose is cracked, simply cut it off with a razor blade (there is about an inch of slack in the tube, so you can cut off little quarter- or half-inch pieces from the end, if needed).

As for fluid, I have used Mobil 1 synthetic Multivehicle ATF and Valvoline Maxlife ATF. I think I like the Maxlife better, but either are fine and probably any number of other ATF's. I don't suggest running the engine while doing this process, though, because its bad for the pump. Instead, if you cannot lift the front wheels off the ground, simply drive them only strips of carpet or even cardboard to reduce the friction, and then turn the wheel from lock to lock with the key in but the engine off.
 
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