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Your description of the AWD system in the Hybrid RAV4 is interesting but somewhat confusing. The flashing lights and front wheels slipping are a function of the tires losing traction (due to lack of tire grip, ie torque and tire tread design vs road surface conditions), and not an indication of loss of traction due to the AWD system's design. In other words, with front wheels having similar tire and surface conditons, slippage would occur whether you're in a RAV4 Hybrid or Subaru. It seems to me the difference would be in how much torque is applied (more torque would increase slippage), and tire design (snow tires would lead to less slippage).
It's just day to day driving in normal dry weather, hit a pothole and the traction light will flash at you/cut power. The difference is between the "part-time" style awd system vs a full time AWD system. The RAV4 Hybrid makes it very apparent that it's a part time system. The symmetrical system more evenly distributes power and is less upset by simple stuff like potholes or accelerating from a red light while turning. Overall I notice the Rav4 hybrid's system is clumsier than others I've driven. Every evening leaving my work parking lot, I hit a dip while turning right and the car freaks out at me even going at very normal speeds.

If you were to compare on a perfect dry day on identical tires, from a standstill, turn your wheel about 45° to the right or left and give it about 30-40% throttle, I could guarantee a Forester would be a lot more composed.
 

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2019 Rav4 Excel AWD
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I think the flashing light over potholes is an oversensitive g-sensor as I've seen it happen when coasting and braking.

If you're gentle with the throttle there's plenty of traction but stabbing it too hard from a standstill can certainly break the front loose before the rear motor wakens up. My last Forester was a CVT and it really didn't like being booted from a standstill either...
First Forester was a manual tranny (so viscous centre diff) and it would't chirp the front tyres in any circumstance, even a clutch dump.
 

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The RAV4 Hybrid's AWD-i is a 'part-time' system, but it is constantly engaged at low speeds (up to about 15 MPH) and when making tighter turns, which I've found to be very helpful. Both of these situations cover the majority of times when AWD (4-wheel) is most useful to maintain better traction on bad surfaces. The 'part-time' system enhances overall fuel-economy and efficiency.
 

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The RAV4 Hybrid's AWD-i is a 'part-time' system, but it is constantly engaged at low speeds (up to about 15 MPH) and when making tighter turns, which I've found to be very helpful. Both of these situations cover the majority of times when AWD (4-wheel) is most useful to maintain better traction on bad surfaces. The 'part-time' system enhances overall fuel-economy and efficiency.
Also, reviewers from Motortrend indicated the rear-axle electric motor does respond more quickly (to slippage) compared to mechanical AWD systems (part-time), since it's reacting to an electronic signal rather than mechanical action (at the center coupling). Probably not noticeable to most people, but makes a slight difference in the real world.
 
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