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Uphill all the way at 70mph with my F-250? No rest needed. Stop only long enough to refuel.
Are we supposed to be mind-readers for your situation?
 

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Rest the engine? It's a piece of machinery, not an animal or human being! As long as you tow no more than the RAV's rated capacity, keep an eye on your dash gauges as usual, and adhere to driving practices as described in the Owner's Manual you can tow theoretically, forever or until the engine or transmission wear out, probably more than 250,000 miles (402236 kilometers) without resting the engine!
 

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I don't think there is a definitive answer to your query. The easiest thing to do would be to get an infrared temperature gun (Cdn Tyre, Amazon). The engine temperature should stay where it normally runs , however, the transmission may be of some concern. Check the temperature of the transmission driving around town and on a highway trip to establish a base line.It should be close to (if not less then) the engine temperature. When you are towing your trailer, pull into a turnout after about 50 kilometers to check the temperature. The transmission temperature will likely be a few degrees warmer but should not exceed about 100 degrees. Pulling on a level road is the ideal, it is the starting from a start that really heats up a transmission, through the torque converter. If the fluid gets beyond 115 degrees, get the fluid changed when you return home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you bent nail for your thoughtful answer. I am as green as they come. Are you sure your not a mind reader? Kindness goes a long way in this world.
 

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Your bladder filling, thirst, hunger, and the gas gauge dropping will determine when you rest the engine.

Also since you are admittedly green you MUST learn how to back up a trailer before you go on the trip.
 

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The transmission temperature will likely be a few degrees warmer but should not exceed about 100 degrees. Pulling on a level road is the ideal, it is the starting from a start that really heats up a transmission, through the torque converter. If the fluid gets beyond 115 degrees, get the fluid changed when you return home.
I agree the transmission temp is the limiting factor but 100 degrees? Oh, you must mean 100C = 212F. That makes more sense. And 115C = 240F.

My TC lockup clutch failed on my '01 F-250 near the start my 2200 mile Daytona trip this year so the transmission was really cooking. I stopped in NJ and had the fluid changed. On the trip home I monitored it and slowed down to 62 mph when it hit the 260s. It came out totally black when I had the TC replaced but the transmission survived.
 

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Thank you bent nail for your thoughtful answer. I am as green as they come. Are you sure your not a mind reader? Kindness goes a long way in this world.
Bent is being as kind as possible with virtually no info to go on.
We have many members who've done extensive towing but if we knew what RAV4 you have - year, engine, tow package or not, what the 3000lbs trailer is - a tall camper or a low flatbed, what speed you intend to go and probably most important what terrain you're towing on, we can offer little specific advice other than his - that transmission temperature not engine rest is the most important. Other than that we're as green as you are.
 

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IMO - I definitely wouldn't tow more than recommended by manufacture. Make sure all your fluids and topped off and check tire pressure. In general, when towing I stop within the first 50 - 100 miles and check everything over (hitch, wiring connector, tires, and lugs). Take your time and allow plenty of stopping distance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a 2010 rav4 v6 3.5 litre limited with factory installed tow package. I am adding a weight distribution hitch with a sway bar. I will be towing a 2017 forest river r pod 20 foot camper trailer with a dry weight of 2900 lbs. I will be pulling the trailer from Winnipeg Manitoba Canada to red lake Ontario, a distance of 476 kilometers. I am wondering if I need to pay special attention to transmission temperature and what device would I need to do this.
 

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Here is an article for you to check out.

http://www.rav4world.com/forums/123-4-4-general/183754-transmission-oil-temperature-reader-2.html

May I also make a suggestion. Pulling an RV can be a palm sweating, nerve wracking experience for anyone. There a several driving schools in Winnipeg that would be happy to help you out with driving technique and confidence building knowledge. The best ones would be those that teach drivers trying to attain their class one. Give Buffalo Driver Training or First Class Training Centre a call and see if they can help you out. The road out to Red Lake looks twisty in places and you will need to learn to keep the trailer in the middle of your lane. Have a safe trip.
 

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Stay out of overdrive. Tow in 4th gear unless it's all downhill.
 

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As mentioned:
Tow in 4th unless downhill. +If it downshifts to 3rd on hills shift there manually to keep it from hunting which raises transmission temps the most.

Practice backing up your rig.

Get some instruction if at all possible.

Additional:
Getting the brake controller set correctly is critical. You should not "feel" the trailer when stopping.

Your loaded weight will likely be right at the 3500lb limit but the V6 will pull it easily and tempt you to go too fast. I'd suggest staying below 100kph.

Proper loading is critical to anti sway stability. I'd distribute the load for around 400lbs of tongue weight and then "lift" the back of the RAV4 with the weight transfer bars so the whole rig sets level.

Remember how long your new rig is so you don't cut people off.

Your fuel mileage will be atrocious - maybe half normal.

Do some local test drives before heading out. You'll need to learn to hold the steering wheel pretty stable to prevent sway.

Driving downhill may seem the easiest but is the most dangerous. Don't pick up too much speed.

Once on the highway don't let anyone rush you. Drive at whatever speed you're comfortable. It will pick up as you settle into towing.
 

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the engine is not the problem, when I tow my RV (also close to 3000lbs) the engine temps stay at 185F and only go up a couple degrees if I'm stuck in traffic... it's the transmission temps that creep up, if they get too high I slow down a bit to reduce the strain. I have a Scangauge 2 to monitor all my temps.

be ready for a shock at the gas pump, fuel economy will be half, I get about 20l/100km
 

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An excellent suggestion!

A link to the Forest River R-Pod trailers. He has the 180.

given Dr. Dyno's post
dry hitch weight 332lbs... that is really close to the 350lbs hitch rating, add a battery and propane tank and you will be over 400lbs,

load the back of it, and try to limit the hitch weight to under 350, and to about 12% of total trailer weight
 

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... I am adding a weight distribution hitch with a sway bar. ...
dry hitch weight 332lbs... that is really close to the 350lbs hitch rating, add a battery and propane tank and you will be over 400lbs, load the back of it, and try to limit the hitch weight to under 350, and to about 12% of total trailer weight
For best sway stability I'd prefer to have closer to 15% weight on the hitch and the weight transfer bars will lift the hitch effectively taking weight off and transferring it to the front axles.
I don't trust a sway bar to do anything for me and thus never use one. IMO, it's a "crutch" that's not needed once trailer weight is properly distributed.
 

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For best sway stability I'd prefer to have closer to 15% weight on the hitch and the weight transfer bars will lift the hitch effectively taking weight off and transferring it to the front axles.
I don't trust a sway bar to do anything for me and thus never use one. IMO, it's a "crutch" that's not needed once trailer weight is properly distributed.
15% might be good for a truck with a real frame and a 1/2 ton payload, but with a unibody like the rav4, I would not want to overload the 4 bolts attached to sheet metal unibody too much. the WD hitch will remove weight from the rear axle, but it will not remove weight from the frame bolts...
 

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Well, actually the WD bars take pressure off the rear bolts of the hitch. It does add pressure to the front ones but since they are further from the hitch point the lever arm greatly mitigates it.
Also since the OP said he's having the factory hitch installed it's hundred extra bolts :thumbs_up: will make it all okay.
 

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Might be worth a transmission drain in fill before the trip. How many miles on the RAV and when was the last time the tranny serviced? Larger transmission cooler could be nice.
 
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