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NC '19 Rav4 Hybrid Limited, Entune 3.0, Adaptive Headlights, Advanced Technology Package
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I ordered the RAV 4 XLE Hybrid on Jul 20 in Toronto.
The first official delivery was made in the middle of October, now it was moved to the end of November.

Read a story where Toyota said they were going to be parts limited for about another month and then things should start to flow again. Stay optimistic.
 

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Interesting looking at delivery times in Canada.
In the US here, we just dropped by a Toyota dealer last week. They had a RV4 Hybrid LE for MSRP, in their allotment for November, with a Nov 2nd build date (the salesman showed it to me on his laptop) . We put down a deposit, fingers crossed. The car has a VIN number now , so looks good for delivery in late November? This car is being built in Georgetown , Kentucky, so no shipping from Japan, etc.
We have a cottage North of Toronto, on Georgian Bay, so if you see a RV4 Hybrid next summer; Ruby-Flare Pearl, with Vermont plates, probably our car. :)
 

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NC '19 Rav4 Hybrid Limited, Entune 3.0, Adaptive Headlights, Advanced Technology Package
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Curious I went to the SouthEast Toyota Distributor web site and was able to identify 207 Rav4 hybrids that were said to be available from dealers within 100 miles of me in the next 6 weeks. So they must be flowing. I don't know what the flow was pre-pandemic so I can't say how slowly. I do know one local dealer has none on his lot.
 

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RAV4 XSE Hybrid 2021
Order - First week of August 2021
Dealership - East Toyota Brampton
Delivery timeline at time of order - Late Oct - End of Nov

Latest update from dealership - No timeline, Order yet not accepted 🙃
 

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RAV4 XSE Hybrid 2021
Order - First week of August 2021
Dealership - East Toyota Brampton
Delivery timeline at time of order - Late Oct - End of Nov

Latest update from dealership - No timeline, Order yet not accepted 🙃
Ordered in late July, northern Mexico. Vehicle has vin, but has yet to appear from Ontario... nothing was received in this country from either the US, Japan, or Canada in the month of October... 'supposedly' November will be the catch-up month.
 

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Ordered in late July, northern Mexico. Vehicle has vin, but has yet to appear from Ontario... nothing was received in this country from either the US, Japan, or Canada in the month of October... 'supposedly' November will be the catch-up month.
Same here Ordered in July (Ontario), delivery date was sept 29th now it got moved to Nov 15th
 

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Does anyone have insights on why dealerships have no idea on deliveres? At least they should be able to provide a timeline. Dealership I placed order at keeps on saying they have no timeline. Like WTF
 

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2017 Tacoma TRD Off Road, On order: 2022 Rav4 HV XSE Tech Package
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Does anyone have insights on why dealerships have no idea on deliveres? At least they should be able to provide a timeline. Dealership I placed order at keeps on saying they have no timeline. Like WTF
Much like the timelines we're getting for parts from Toyota... vehicles from Toyota have wildly varying ETAs. I'm told that most dealers aren't providing much of an ETA anymore.
 

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RAV 4.5 2021 Hybrid AWD
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The shortage doesnt have to be getting worse. All that is needed is that they are still filling back orders from early in the year or last yearn and there is insufficient capacity to temporarily ramp up production. The reason may be this simple (though happy to hear nuances).

In the interests of economy and efficiency during the 1970s and 1980s the supply and demand networks became more precise because 'they' developed empirical statistics based tools for predicting said supply and demand. So it was possible to cut down on 'fat in the inventory system' (reserve components kept on or near site to allow for ups and downs in the supply and demand which previously werent so predictable). The good side is with less lazy capital along with other advances the price you need to sell things for has plummetted. Factories are built for the likely demand and no bigger. Brilliant......while it worked.

The trouble with today this tight inter-connectedness and no fat, is that the global economy is not so prepared for catastrophic risks being realized despite knowing about of their existence. The WEF (Davos bunch) has a list of about 30 of them with pandemics right at the top of the list. Despite this, operationally there is little preparation except on a company by company as with Toyota who did lay a supply of chips in when early in the pandemic it looked like demand generally would drop. Instead governments have propped up economies but demand has shifted as people stop air traveling and replace this with local car traveling. Meanwhile demand for transportation components has also been screwed up specifically containers with empty ones piling up in odd places a long way from where they are needed. We see this in Australia a lot more probably because our neoliberal governments (leftish and rightish) have has gutted our manufacturing especially for cars, again in the name of efficiency. Hence our more severe delays despite the coronavirus impacts being far less than in say North America......win some lose some.

Anyway the result is shortages all through the system (mail, coffee, amateur telescopes...all over the place) as barriers to trade go up and concertina like a caterpillar. Mostly the impacts are trivial, unless you are directly affected like with the airline industry. So delays and shortages are now just a normal part of life for the not so foreseeable future.

Incidentally governments knew this was possible, like with the oil shocks and wars of the past and some allowances have been made like those giant strategic fuel reserves in Texas. But companies operate on the razor's edge if they are in serious competition with rivals as with the car industry. So building up fat in the past would have reduced their competitiveness short term. So I wouldnt blame Toyota too much. They are caught between a rock and a hard place.
 

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US experience.
My wife and I went to a Toyota dealership, after being frustrated by Subaru dealers trying to sell us overpriced Foresters; one with $4000 in add-ons. This was in Vermont.
While we had never owned a Toyota before, the dealership we visited, on a whim, October 10th, had a 2021 RV4 Hybrid LE in their allotment. It had a build date of Nov 2nd, in Kentucky.
So we put down a deposit and crossed our fingers.
While we couldn't change any of the specs, at that point in the build, the only expensive option was the
Blind Spot Monitor w/ Rear Cross-Traffic Alert,
Outside Mirrors w/ Turn Signal & Blind Spot Warning Indicators.
This option is actually pretty useful; signaling passing cars that are in your blind spot..
Otherwise the price we paid was MSRP, plus a special color paint surcharge.
After receiving the temporary VIN number, we kept checking the Toyota Vehicle Specification website,
Vehicle Specification | Toyota Owners
When the last 5 VIN digits become all numbers (no letter) then the car is nearly ready.
We received our car, at the dealership on November 17th
 
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