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Not necessarily. There are several 16A EVSE's on the market that will work fine on a 20A circuit and can use various suitable plug configurations (14-30, 10-30, 6-20, etc...). For example, see here and here.
Good point. But a 120volt 16amp charger would probably take 6 hours to charge. Adding a 240v breaker and 1450 outlet would cost about $50 max, add in the adapter cable, for the same result as the 16A EVSE.

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It's an extension cord with another name complete with its PVC ends!

I'm poking fun at a couple of others here who tried to make the case my brand new 12" 15amp rated extension cord posed an actual safety hazard and the chief argument was its PVC ends.
 

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Good point. But a 120volt 16amp charger would probably take 6 hours to charge. Adding a 240v breaker and 1450 outlet would cost about $50 max, add in the adapter cable, for the same result as the 16A EVSE.
I'm not sure I understand. The first EVSE that I linked can be configured as a level 1 or level 2, the second that I linked is level 2. At any rate, if the vehicle discussed has the standard 3.3kW on board charger, then the charge time expectations can be summarized as per the attached. Note that EVSE capacity beyond 16A doesn't speed up charge time, the default on-board charger will only use 13.75A and no more, regardless of EVSE capacity.

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Clearly you are mistaken, look again at the 1.5-foot-long View attachment 176287
adapter.

Tom
No, clearly YOU are mistaken. Look again at the photo. The female receptacle is a 6-50R which is much larger than a standard 120V outlet! And the wide slot is on the wrong side!
 

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It's an extension cord with another name complete with its PVC ends!

I'm poking fun at a couple of others here who tried to make the case my brand new 12" 15amp rated extension cord posed an actual safety hazard and the chief argument was its PVC ends.
Touche'

I'll gladly go on record here and say that any adapter that converts a 240v circuit to a 120v plug is a bad idea. Even if Amazon sells it. You don't know when some kid or your wife ends up in your garage, unplugs your EVSE, plugs some other 120v contraption into your plug that is supposed to be 120v and electrocutes himself. There's a reason electrical connections are standardized to an expected voltage.

[edited] Ya'll if you're going to do it, clamshell and secure the cord per AMP Power below or better yet buy a rated 240v EVSE and do it right. Its a $50k vehicle after all.
 

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I'll gladly go on record here and say that any adapter that converts a 240v circuit to a 120v plug is a bad idea. Even if Amazon sells it. You don't know when some kid or your wife ends up in your garage, unplugs your EVSE, plugs some other 120v contraption into your plug that is supposed to be 120v and electrocutes himself. There's a reason electrical connections are standardized to an expected voltage.

Ya'll if you're going to do it, do it right. Cut the cord off the Toyota Evse and put a 240v plug on it if you want to use it like that. It's even cheaper than these adapters.
Please note that you cannot cut off the end of the OEM EVSE cord. There is an overheat sensor in the plug that you would disable by cutting it off.
If an adapter is used to convert the EVSE to 240V there are clamshell devices that can clamp onto the plug end and then a small padlock used to lock the plug and adapter together. This makes the connection foolproof from the standpoint of someone inadvertently unplugging the EVSE.
 

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I am a DIY guy but I am with Chuckles70 regarding the 220V > 110V adapter. You figure "it's just me and I can control what happens with this" but you just never know years down the line. Take the morbid approach - what if I get hit by a bus? What is going to happen with that "foolproof" adapter once I am gone and "who knows who" is left to deal with it. Just not worth it IMHO. But I do understand why people do it and certainly hope they make sure the circuit is GFCI/AFCI protected. The one saving grace is that most people don't have a lot of 220V plugs to plug it into.
 

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I am a DIY guy but I am with Chuckles70 regarding the 220V > 110V adapter. You figure "it's just me and I can control what happens with this" but you just never know years down the line. Take the morbid approach - what if I get hit by a bus? What is going to happen with that "foolproof" adapter once I am gone and "who knows who" is left to deal with it. Just not worth it IMHO. But I do understand why people do it and certainly hope they make sure the circuit is GFCI/AFCI protected. The one saving grace is that most people don't have a lot of 220V plugs to plug it into.
While I totally understand what you're saying, I don't think you are familiar with the clamping device I described. It is a lockable device that secures the plug end of the EVSE to the 120v female end of the adapter. The other end of the adapter plugs into a 240v outlet on the wall. The only option to someone without the key is to unplug from the 240v outlet but then there is no possibility to plug a 120v plug into the 240v outlet as it won't go in. These devices are used in industry to lock out devices that employ a plug (not hardwired) while being serviced. While not 100% foolproof, one either needs the key or else would have to use a hacksaw to cut the device off. Close enough to 100% for me.
 
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I haven't seen the exact device but I have seen similar and while I agree that IF someone decides to use an adapter of this type they should definitely get one my point is the same. If I am gone there is a chance somebody who does not understand the intent could remove the lock and wonder what the fuss is about and at some point remove the lock and the adapter could be used in a dangerous way. I don't judge people who decide this is a good solution for them (I might well have done it myself 40 years ago) I just think it is important to consider all the possible consequences before they use an adapter like this to provide 220V to a 110V plug. If the EVSE is suitable for either voltage (which I have no doubt it is) it is too bad Toyota did not come up with a clever way to allow either 220V or 110V plugs.
 

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I haven't seen the exact device but I have seen similar and while I agree that IF someone decides to use an adapter of this type they should definitely get one my point is the same. If I am gone there is a chance somebody who does not understand the intent could remove the lock and wonder what the fuss is about and at some point remove the lock and the adapter could be used in a dangerous way. I don't judge people who decide this is a good solution for them (I might well have done it myself 40 years ago) I just think it is important to consider all the possible consequences before they use an adapter like this to provide 220V to a 110V plug. If the EVSE is suitable for either voltage (which I have no doubt it is) it is too bad Toyota did not come up with a clever way to allow either 220V or 110V plugs.
While I totally understand what you're saying, I don't think you are familiar with the clamping device I described. It is a lockable device that secures the plug end of the EVSE to the 120v female end of the adapter. The other end of the adapter plugs into a 240v outlet on the wall. The only option to someone without the key is to unplug from the 240v outlet but then there is no possibility to plug a 120v plug into the 240v outlet as it won't go in. These devices are used in industry to lock out devices that employ a plug (not hardwired) while being serviced. While not 100% foolproof, one either needs the key or else would have to use a hacksaw to cut the device off. Close enough to 100% for me.


Please note that you cannot cut off the end of the OEM EVSE cord. There is an overheat sensor in the plug that you would disable by cutting it off.
If an adapter is used to convert the EVSE to 240V there are clamshell devices that can clamp onto the plug end and then a small padlock used to lock the plug and adapter together. This makes the connection foolproof from the standpoint of someone inadvertently unplugging the EVSE.
Im just struggling with the bigger perspective here. Toyota goes out of their way to keep end users out of the charger. (When have you ever seen a tri-wing screw in the vehicle like we have in the charger?). They dont supply a 240v option.

Customers go out of their way to hack the charger by energizing a 120v outlet to 240v. Then to make it “safe” they clamshell and padlock the connection to keep others out. (Wink wink I’m sure they are all done that way).

So a hack on top of a hack. Got it. And I get picked on because I take the same stance on extension cords that every other regulatory body on the planet seems to endorse. Riiiiggghhhtt.

Back to the OP- she did the right thing. She called an electrician. He fixed the problem. And all is well. Im sure she’s enjoying this little diversion from the topic :)
 

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Toyota goes out of their way to keep end users out of the charger. (When have you ever seen a tri-wing screw in the vehicle like we have in the charger?). They dont supply a 240v option.
And I'll add that while slapping a 240v converter on the OEM EVSE may indeed 'work', it doesn't mean the EVSE was specifically designed to operate as such. Regardless, I'm quite certain that in the event of a malfunction that may cause any damage, it would be a quick claim rejection by every single insurance company in the country.

And I get picked on because I take the same stance on extension cords that every other regulatory body on the planet seems to endorse. Riiiiggghhhtt.
Unfortunately some folks think they know better than those regulatory bodies by reasoning "it works for me". Perhaps more unfortunately, it will likely take one of those rejected insurance claims to help them understand that they do not.
 

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Customers go out of their way to hack the charger by energizing a 120v outlet to 240v. Then to make it “safe” they clamshell and padlock the connection to keep others out. (Wink wink I’m sure they are all done that way).
While I applaud your heightened concern for safety, I'm not sure where you got the impression that I'm endorsing converting a 120v outlet to 240v. As I earlier stated, the outlet on the wall has a 240v slot configuration that prevents a 120v plug from being inserted. This is not a hack but is a code compliant configuration that any licensed electrician can perform.
The lockable clamshell device is OSHA approved to prevent unauthorized access to the plug. Hardly a hack.
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Lastly, I trust the OEM Toyota EVSE plugged into a 240v outlet far more than many of the cheap L2 EVSEs that are on the market. The OEM EVSE has been used for many thousands of charging hours (both Prius and Rav4 Primes) and have clearly proven that they can run successfully on both 120 and 240 volts. I totally appreciate that you're not comfortable with doing this but for many of us the potential risks can be easily mitigated.
 
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This is not a hack but is a code compliant configuration that any licensed electrician can perform.
When you throw out phrases like “code compliant” and “licensed electrician” I have to respond.

NO licensed electrician would offer a solution that energizes a 120v plug to 240v for the express purpose of running an electrical appliance outside of the specifications of the nameplate. S/He would not be licensed for long.

I don’t think you understand NEC code. A code compliant lockout device is compliant to lock something from being energized or tampered with. Not to absolve another [eggregious] code issue. 1,000 of 1,000 true professionals in the field would think this whole approach is a bad idea. Period. Consult post #55.

Now with that said, folks are going to hack the EVSE. And I’m not going to change their mind. So I agree that some type of protection is a good idea. But I’m not going to let a post skate implying that there is a solution that meets code.
 

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When you throw out phrases like “code compliant” and “licensed electrician” I have to respond.

NO licensed electrician would offer a solution that energizes a 120v plug to 240v for the express purpose of running an electrical appliance outside of the specifications of the nameplate. S/He would not be licensed for long.

I don’t think you understand NEC code. A code compliant lockout device is compliant to lock something from being energized or tampered with. Not to absolve another [eggregious] code issue. 1,000 of 1,000 true professionals in the field would think this whole approach is a bad idea. Period. Consult post #55.

Now with that said, folks are going to hack the EVSE. And I’m not going to change their mind. So I agree that some type of protection is a good idea. But I’m not going to let a post skate implying that there is a solution that meets code.
Chuckles, I'm afraid you've taken my code compliance statement out of context. I stated that any licensed electrician can wire an outlet to provide 240v with the appropriate outlet configuration. The homeowner is the one who plugs the EVSE cord/adapter into the new outlet. This would not put the electrician in any more of a liability situation than if he/she provided a new 15A outlet in someone's living room and then the homeowner uses the outlet to plug in a heating device that requires 20A and repeatedly overloads the circuit.
As far as the lock out device I mentioned, it is OSHA compliant and it is being used to prevent tampering with the plug.
I guess at this point we'll have to agree to disagree. I feel the solution brings any risk well below a reasonable expectation of safety. Not 100%, but close enough. By taking the steps I've described I feel it poses far less danger to me and my loved ones than taking the car for a drive where my safety is in the hands of all the distracted drivers on the streets.
 
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