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I suspect the lift components will work on the hybrid just as well as the gas model, but without proper alignment kit to correct the CV joint angles, there's gonna be problems. From the FAQs on the CMR site. Not something I'd do on a daily driver.


Will a Lift Kit Damage the Car?


Installing a lift kit will create positive camber on the wheels. In the case of the front axle, which is usually the primary drive, the positive camber can cause premature wear in the CV joints on the front CV drive shafts. Premature wear can be visibly detected by inspecting the front axle every 500 miles for CV joint grease that was spat out from the CV joint. If all the grease is ejected the CV drive shaft will need to be replaced (usually around $60 per drive shaft at national auto parts stores). This rate of this process varies but wear will accelerate if the vehicle is frequently driven over 55 MPH or if larger tire diameters are installed. This process can be reversed by adjusting the camber to maximum negative. In some cases, there is no existing adjustment or the existing adjustment is not enough. In these cases an aftermarket camber correction kit will need to be installed to return the camber to a OE acceptable range of +1 to -1. Camber adjustments will be most effective if made with a professional alignment rack found at vehicle service shops. While this will protect the drive shafts, other issues such as control arm clearance, bumping, or rattling may result but are usually not as mechanically concerning as the drive shafts. Bear in mind a CUV is not an SUV and to some degree issues and premature wear should be seen as an inevitable and inherent nature of lifting this class of vehicle.
 

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I see it as designed for rock crawler wanabees but it does show some innovation.
 

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I doubt that they can achieve 14" of ground clearance with the mods which they advertise - 2 1/2 inch and 3 inch lift kit, for example, and the before and after pics don't show that much change. The prices are high, and if they were able achieve the advertised ground clearance that would be a recipe for early drive train problems and likely would void at least part of the Toyota drivetrain warranty.
 

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Yes, coilovers are adjustable up and down. They can achieve the same lift as far as I know. Just have to find the right ones.
 

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Can coilovers acheive the same lift as the lift spacers?
Or are coilovers only to lower cars?

It all depends on what you want. Say you have 2.5" on your coilovers and 2.5" on lift spacers, add a drop bracket kit and you can achieve 5". Or there are long travel kits, but have seen none for a Rav4.
 

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What's less wear and tear on a whole car as a whole?
coilovers or lift spacers?
Depends on what the product is made out of. Cheaper product, cheaper wear and tear. Steeper angles put more stress on the ball joints and other suspension components causing them to wear faster. Also, your alignment may go out of whack too, so be careful.
 

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Depends on what the product is made out of. Cheaper product, cheaper wear and tear. Steeper angles put more stress on the ball joints and other suspension components causing them to wear faster. Also, your alignment may go out of whack too, so be careful.
I was more concerned with the stock parts that are affected by right height.
What affects the alignment/ball joints the least; spacers or coilovers?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I was more concerned with the stock parts that are affected by right height.
What affects the alignment/ball joints the least; spacers or coilovers?
The height you choose is the main thing.

Spacers are typically the worse lift choice but cheapest and quickest option. Your spring rate stays the same and you lose travel in your suspension. Your ride quality will stay the same though (if its top plate spacer). These will be ok if its a light amount of lift and you are mainly on the street.

Lift springs are usually the next choice. Fresh spring rate. But if you only do lift springs with stock shocks, you are extending the shock and will lose down travel when the suspension extends. You keep over extending your shock and will prematurely wear it out. You can get a longer shock to go with the spring. You will need to flex your suspension and measure it to determine the size of shock to go with the spring.

Coil overs would be the best option for quality and ride. They are by far the most expensive though. Spring/strut combo meant to work together with the proper travel that you can adjust yourself for the best height/ride.

No matter what you chose though, if you try to lift too much (im not sure what the Rav4 limits would be), you will end up putting too much angle on your CV axles and that will wear the boots out causing them to fail. Control arms come into play as well and your drive line angles which can cause lots of vibration if they end up too far out. Depending how high you go, your alignment may not be able to be corrected enough to keep your tires from wearing too fast. Im not sure what kind of alignment correction kits are out there for the Rav.

I have not messed with the Rav suspension at all really yet, but on my Tacomas, over 2.5" lift and things get expensive. Even at that height, I still needed carrier bearing drop, differential drop, rear brake line bracket extension, and had to pull my driver CV for a needle bearing that went bad in the front differential.
 

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The height you choose is the main thing.

Spacers are typically the worse lift choice but cheapest and quickest option. Your spring rate stays the same and you lose travel in your suspension. Your ride quality will stay the same though (if its top plate spacer). These will be ok if its a light amount of lift and you are mainly on the street.

Lift springs are usually the next choice. Fresh spring rate. But if you only do lift springs with stock shocks, you are extending the shock and will lose down travel when the suspension extends. You keep over extending your shock and will prematurely wear it out. You can get a longer shock to go with the spring. You will need to flex your suspension and measure it to determine the size of shock to go with the spring.

Coil overs would be the best option for quality and ride. They are by far the most expensive though. Spring/strut combo meant to work together with the proper travel that you can adjust yourself for the best height/ride.

No matter what you chose though, if you try to lift too much (im not sure what the Rav4 limits would be), you will end up putting too much angle on your CV axles and that will wear the boots out causing them to fail. Control arms come into play as well and your drive line angles which can cause lots of vibration if they end up too far out. Depending how high you go, your alignment may not be able to be corrected enough to keep your tires from wearing too fast. Im not sure what kind of alignment correction kits are out there for the Rav.

I have not messed with the Rav suspension at all really yet, but on my Tacomas, over 2.5" lift and things get expensive. Even at that height, I still needed carrier bearing drop, differential drop, rear brake line bracket extension, and had to pull my driver CV for a needle bearing that went bad in the front differential.
thanks for your insight.
My next question is what are the possible ways to add extra support to the CV joints?
I'm interested in using the coilover options since it's the best for quality and ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
thanks for your insight.
My next question is what are the possible ways to add extra support to the CV joints?
I'm interested in using the coilover options since it's the best for quality and ride.
You really cant. The cv angle is directly related to the amount of lift. There are aftermarket "high angle" cv axles and boots out there but I have not heard they really help too much. There is another trick you can try... extending the boot out and making a stop for it This will keep the boot fins from touching if you have too much angle. It takes some work though. https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/boot-slide-mod-no-more-blowing-cv-boots.146070/ Only needed if you lift enough to cause the fins/ribs to touch.

I would need to look under the Rav better to see how its setup but you want to keep your lift at a height that does not cause the cv boot "ribs" to be touching each other. That is what will cause them to wear through a hole and allow grease to escape and dirt/moisture in and cause them to fail. I dont know what that amount of lift would be.

That is the good thing about coilovers though. You have that adjust ability to get it where it should be without causing too much stress. I would think you should be able to get up to 2" of lift without worrying too much. That is just a guess though.
 
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