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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,

I have a 1996 RAV4, FWD, manual, 4 door.

I'm trying to find a replacement trailing arm, LEFT rear (driver's side), part# 4871242905.

Apparently 4871242905 and 4871242900 are interchangeable. Most U.S. Toyota parts websites say "discontinued" for both.

I found one Calif. website that claims to have 4871242900 in stock.

I found 5 websites in Canada that claim to have 4871242905 in stock – very expensive.

PartsByPost.com in Japan claims to have both on their website.

Has anyone successfully ordered either of these part numbers?

thanks,
JC
 

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1998 Rav4, manual transmission, 2WD, 5-door, JDM engine installed in 2013
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-- If you are willing to buy a used trailing arm, I recommend trying car-part.com. At the latter, drill down to "control arm, rear... " Prices are running under $100 for the part, plus the cost of shipping. I used car-part.com twice over ten years ago and thought it was great. Granted this may be affiliated-salvage yard dependent.

-- I see signs that 48712-42905 replaces 48712-42900 . E.g. see 48712-42905 - Toyota Parts Deal

-- But I also think I recall some subtle differences between the trailing arms occurring on the 1996 and 1997 Rav4s. I'd say: Be prepared.

-- Having ABS brakes (vs. not having ABS) will make a difference. Though I do not know if the 1996-1997 had ABS as an option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Elle.

Yeah, I don't think the new ones are available... they are just listed in error on the parts websites.

As for a used one, if I could find one, I'm concerned I'd run in to the same situation I have now, which is the replacement of a worn bushing, and bolt assembly replacement. I've been told it's a bad idea trying to replace a trailing arm bushing in these ancient, rusty trailing arms. To further complicate things, the bolt assemblies inside them may be fused with the inside of the bushing (rusted together). Since the purpose of the bolt assembly is to provide a toe adjustment, the bolt needs to be tightened down into position. The bushing is supposed to accommodate movement, but if the bolt assembly is fused to the bushing (and the bolt is tightened down), then the movement is transferred to the bracket, and then the bracket can break.

The reason I'm dealing with trailing arms right now is that the left trailing arm bracket broke in 2019/2020, and a shop did some welding to repair it. We noticed recently that the weld had failed, so we're back at it again. I have lined up an expert welder to fabricate a new weld-on bracket, and a mechanic with a lift who is friends with the welder. Last night I sent photos and measurements to the welder, so he can do the fabrication.

For now we have decided to leave the right side trailing arm alone, since the bracket is intact.

(By the way, for anyone reading this who isn't familiar – these bolt assemblies are loosened NOT by loosening the nut, as would be expected. They are loosened by holding the nut stationary and loosening the bolt head. To remove the bolt, you back it out 10 full turns and a bit more, then the nut will be free. Or, you can begin loosening the nut after 7 turns of the bolt head.)

For the left trailing arm, it has to be removed for the welder to do his work. I'm thinking not completely removed from the car, but just the bolt assembly removed from the bushing, so the arm can be dropped out of the way. The first thing will be to remove the nut on the bolt assembly, and for that I'm going to hit it with penetrating lubricant for a few days prior. If the lubricant can get down inside the bushing, that would help too, and apparently driving the car a bit would also help free this up if it's fused.

With the trailing arm removed, we'll see if the bolt assembly comes out easily. If so, we're good to go – I have a new bolt assembly ready to go. If the bolt assembly doesn't want to come out, we'll try to coax it out. We can use a lot of force, since we're throwing away the old part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
OP: If not already, read my recent posts on redoing the suspension. I have my RR arm and its bushing out, but have been too busy to work on it again. I have a new tool waiting to press the new bearing in.
Nice job... thanks for sharing that. What year is your RAV? Mine is '96.

Given what you have been through with that RR, do you think it's possible to force out the old one of these (below) from the old bushing? I call this part the "sleeve". I'm wondering if it's better to attempt this, rather than replace the bushing.

Cylinder Gas Tin Handwriting Auto part


If I can get the old one out, then the hole through the bushing needs to be cleaned up. How possible would that be?

Now that you have the old bushing removed, is it fairly straightforward to press a new one in, from what you've gathered in your research?

Last question... how easy was it to remove the TA, to enable this next step? Were the nuts you removed all rusty and frozen on? Did you use the penetrating lubricant a lot?
Wood Gas Kitchen utensil Hand tool Auto part



thanks,
JC
 

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2000. Everything about the job is quite difficult and time consuming, at least for me (who has had little time lately). Otherwise it would be done already. Everything "rust welded" together, despite my undercarriage not otherwise looking rusty. Toyota did this assembly poorly, in terms of long-term serviceability.

I have not pressed in the new front bushing yet, but have a new super heavy duty C-clamp type kit waiting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@LugNut, so this part was "rust-welded" into the bushing?

Cylinder Tin Gas Handwriting Auto part


(For anyone reading this who doesn't know, this is the part that must rotate inside the bushing in order to make the toe adjustment. When the bolt head is tightened down, this holds the adjustment in place. In order to tighten, the nut must be held in place.)

Given that this part is normally freed by holding the nut and loosening the head, did you attempt to do that? Or were you fixed on replacing the bushing and just cut the cam off with a grinder wheel?

Thanks!

PS> Just to let you know, I really appreciate you did this work and posted it here, because my car is on the verge of winding up at the junk yard, even though the engine is running great – the information and photos you provided in your thread are invaluable.
 
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