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OK, tell the truth, how many looked up the VIN number in table 1 on page 3 to see if the tested vehicle was on the recall?
 

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Haha, how did that help you with fill up problem and what do expect to see under the car?
I make sure that nothing in rusted underneath, that bolts have not been turned, and that there is no physical damage.

This is the first time I hear of a fill up problem with a car.
 

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I make sure that nothing in rusted underneath, that bolts have not been turned, and that there is no physical damage.

This is the first time I hear of a fill up problem with a car.
It's not going to help. All these issues/recalls are not going to uncovered from the visual check. I would bet you won't be able to tell if the engine was replaced just by looking underneath or even in engine bay. It's unique situation though
 

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It's not going to help. All these issues/recalls are not going to uncovered from the visual check. I would bet you won't be able to tell if the engine was replaced just by looking underneath or even in engine bay. It's unique situation though
You can tell if you have a good and trained eye
 

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The labor to replace an engine is roughly a 16-18 hour job. Replacing a fuel pump (which may also require removing and cleaning the gas tank) is a 3-4 hour job. A good Toyota mechanic should be able to complete either job.

As owners of potentially affected vehicles we will each have to decide whether to keep our cars with the new engines or not. I am in the same boat as you all as I own a 2020 rav4 (gas model), although at this moment it’s unclear if my car has a bad block or not. My own feeling is if my car gets a new engine and it runs as well as it does today, I will keep it and drive it for several years.
And there's the qualifier, a competent mechanic. Finding one is the problem. I live in a small town and there's one dealer. I don't even trust the techs at that dealer to do an oil change properly, let alone replace an entire engine while trying to stay within the flat rate hours they'll get allocated to perform the operation. Hell, even when I had that simple ECU update done, the supposed "master tech" forgot to reinstall that red plastic positive battery terminal cover. I mean come on, it's RED and requires a second to snap back on. So what gets "forgotten" when installing all the myriad parts required for changing out an entire engine, especially when they're getting paid perform that operation in a fixed amount of time, a time that Toyota probably comes up with during an "ideal" engine swap under "ideal" conditions. No thanks. I don't even trust them to fix the transfer case properly if that issue crops up on my Adventure.

I remember my brother telling me about the Tacoma frame swaps during the rust debacle. He works out on Swan Island, which is close to where the importers ship in their cars. He told me about how Toyota took over an entire warehouse just to have who knows who "workers" pull the entire bodies and drive hardware off of brand new Tacoma trucks just to swap out entire frames. Makes one wonder how many supposedly "new" Tacomas went out to customers with all sorts of weird problems because things weren't put back together right because it was probably done in a hurry by questionably trained techs.
 

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Where is this red cover located?
I had the ECU update and want to check to see if mine got put back on.
 

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It snaps over the positive battery terminal on the front of the battery and is a red plastic part. When detached, it's usually is left hanging by the positive battery cable. If it slips down the cable, it'll be harder to find, which can happen.
 

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And there's the qualifier, a competent mechanic. Finding one is the problem. I live in a small town and there's one dealer. I don't even trust the techs at that dealer to do an oil change properly, let alone replace an entire engine while trying to stay within the flat rate hours they'll get allocated to perform the operation. Hell, even when I had that simple ECU update done, the supposed "master tech" forgot to reinstall that red plastic positive battery terminal cover. I mean come on, it's RED and requires a second to snap back on. So what gets "forgotten" when installing all the myriad parts required for changing out an entire engine, especially when they're getting paid perform that operation in a fixed amount of time, a time that Toyota probably comes up with during an "ideal" engine swap under "ideal" conditions. No thanks. I don't even trust them to fix the transfer case properly if that issue crops up on my Adventure.

I remember my brother telling me about the Tacoma frame swaps during the rust debacle. He works out on Swan Island, which is close to where the importers ship in their cars. He told me about how Toyota took over an entire warehouse just to have who knows who "workers" pull the entire bodies and drive hardware off of brand new Tacoma trucks just to swap out entire frames. Makes one wonder how many supposedly "new" Tacomas went out to customers with all sorts of weird problems because things weren't put back together right because it was probably done in a hurry by questionably trained techs.
One of the reasons I bought a new Toyota was because I wanted a reliable vehicle that didn't need a lot service that the dealer's "master techs" could screw up. Just like when they misrouted the serpentine belt on my Chevy. There was a freakin diagram sticker for this posted right under the hood. It's like a bad joke...
 

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I don't know how much of that is stupidity or carelessness. Working on a car for a flat rate tends to induce hurry and carelessness because the auto manufacturers like things getting done quickly and cheaply, forgetting that in the real world of car repair, it's not so clean and simple. With warranty repairs, they are even more cheapskate on the time it takes, because THEY are paying for it,.
 

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I checked my Toyota app and mine is on the recall list. I am going to fight for them to switch out my Rav for another since it is still fairly new. I'm not sure how that will go.
 

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I checked my Toyota app and mine is on the recall list. I am going to fight for them to switch out my Rav for another since it is still fairly new. I'm not sure how that will go.
I'm rooting for you but let me tell you: it probably won't go well. If swapping is an option, I'd love to swap ours which is less than a month old.
 

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One of the reasons I bought a new Toyota was because I wanted a reliable vehicle that didn't need a lot service that the dealer's "master techs" could screw up. Just like when they misrouted the serpentine belt on my Chevy. There was a freakin diagram sticker for this posted right under the hood. It's like a bad joke...
I do all my work because I cannot trust the techs at the dealership.
 

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I'm rooting for you but let me tell you: it probably won't go well. If swapping is an option, I'd love to swap ours which is less than a month old.

Sad part is they probably knew about the problem before you bought it.

They don't do these recalls with doing a lot of research before releasing the recall to the public
 

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And there's the qualifier, a competent mechanic. Finding one is the problem.
This brings up the main concern I have about this whole thing. Toyota is going to fix it for free - great. They are going to fix it by replacing the entire engine - great, but also scary. An engine replacement was quoted as a 16 hour job by someone earlier in this thread and obviously sound really complicated. However, I am wondering if it could be a blessing in disguise. Is it possible that a full engine swap could actually be easier and less error prone versus changing out parts of an engine? Here's my analogy - imagine you had to repair an audio/video amplifier. You have the option of unscrewing the whole PCB/motherboard from the case and swapping in an entirely new unit or you have a repair that needs to desolder some delicate surface mount components, wires, capacitors, etc. Which one is harder? I think unplugging some connectors and swapping in an entirely new populated board seems much easier.

I am obviously not a mechanic but can someone who has experience with cars chime in? Is an engine swap possibly considered an 'easy' job; something that might actually take less skill than replacing a major part of the engine?
 

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Sad part is they probably knew about the problem before you bought it.

They don't do these recalls with doing a lot of research before releasing the recall to the public
You're totally right. I bet they did but I think if you believe that then you should also agree that they probably won't let a car swap happen. You'd think that by the time they figured it out, they would have recalled all cars on lots and on ships, before they reached customers hands. Then they could fix it and release them. Surely that would be cheaper and less of a PR nightmare than letting it get to customers hands and having to recall it then for a (complicated?) engine swap. But they decided to go with the latter route. This cost analysis is interesting to me and there must be factors we're missing.
 

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This brings up the main concern I have about this whole thing. Toyota is going to fix it for free - great. They are going to fix it by replacing the entire engine - great, but also scary. An engine replacement was quoted as a 16 hour job by someone earlier in this thread and obviously sound really complicated. However, I am wondering if it could be a blessing in disguise. Is it possible that a full engine swap could actually be easier and less error prone versus changing out parts of an engine? Here's my analogy - imagine you had to repair an audio/video amplifier. You have the option of unscrewing the whole PCB/motherboard from the case and swapping in an entirely new unit or you have a repair that needs to desolder some delicate surface mount components, wires, capacitors, etc. Which one is harder? I think unplugging some connectors and swapping in an entirely new populated board seems much easier.

I am obviously not a mechanic but can someone who has experience with cars chime in? Is an engine swap possibly considered an 'easy' job; something that might actually take less skill than replacing a major part of the engine?
engine swap is the best outcome. You don't want the techs doing any type of engine work lol. That would be the worst.
 
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