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So Toyota Canada nor my dealer had my VIN on record, i have the NVIS and the local dealer Service manager asks me " do you have this car?' i was like YEAHHH. Anyways, i got that corrected and as soon as i do, Local dealer calls me up saying MY ENGINE could blow up and i need to bring the car into the dealership. However, the Toyota Canada 1888 number customer service said there was a interim recall on my VIN. But they are not sure if it needs an engine replacement. I drove my 2020 XLE out from dealership like less than 18 days ago and only have 400 Kms on the engine lol. SCREWED....!!! my VIN# ends 066797 and Engine# starts with K15xxx printed on the front of the engine block. i see alot of Dxxxxx # not sure where that other number that can only be viewed using an endoscope can be found.
Unless your car has been sitting on a dealer lot for over a month or two, I’m kinda doubting your vehicle is being recalled...you can verify it yourself by plugging your vin into the appropriate Toyota recall website (it may be different for Canada vs. US models)...if it comes back with a recall notice for the engine, take it in to your local Toyota dealer to check the engine number, as they are the only ones who can verify whether you indeed have a bad engine block. Of the people on this forum who have done this, no one (yet) has been told that their engines are affected. So it would be a rare event if your rav4 was affected (e.g. about .5% chance)...
 

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I am betting that maybe only 250 were labeled as bad during the gauge issue. But I bet Toyota is suspicious of stuff coming out of the plant during a certain period being either close to crappy or crappy itself. We would need a Toyota tech to state the contents of the check procedure.
All they do is check the block number. That’s it. Period. See my previous post... It’s also not the number everyone seems to think it is.
 

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All they do is check the block number. That’s it. Period. See my previous post... It’s also not the number everyone seems to think it is.
Guess dealers are still super efficient. Why keep a customer waiting for hours to check a number then? Would seem you would want to get it processed as quickly as possible unless they are trying to put on "airs" that they are doing more than a number reference.

The more PITA this process is...the more irritated the customers are going to get.
 

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Guess dealers are still super efficient. Why keep a customer waiting for hours to check a number then? Would seem you would want to get it processed as quickly as possible unless they are trying to put on "airs" that they are doing more than a number reference.

The more PITA this process is...the more irritated the customers are going to get.

Lol, if it’s just checking numbers it should be pretty fast. My Subaru had a recall where they had to look up the date code on the plastic turbo inlet pipe. The turbo is buried down low by the crankshaft pulley, so the car had to be lifted to check this. Still it only took 15 mins to complete. Had to come another day for the part to come to replace it though.
 

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All they do is check the block number. That’s it. Period. See my previous post... It’s also not the number everyone seems to think it is.
I am glad that's all they are doing. Perhaps the number they check is actually the block serial number and not the engine (ie: 2 different serial numbers).
Thanks for the update Spaceballs.
 

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Both my cars cleared through as "not affected". They both went in at the same appointment time...Rav4 cleared in just under 1 hour, and the Camry 45 minutes after the Rav4. Still wondering if there is something additional done depending on the engine block number. My salesman said there was a pressure test involved, though judging by the speed the cars were cleared, it sure seems to just be a number check. Maybe certain engine block numbers are looked at a lot closer than others, or maybe they have the process more streamlined now after checking a few cars. He said there were a few cars in inventory that were checked and also not affected.
 

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Based on the time spent on each car, it sure sounds like just a serial number check. Toyota must sure be convinced the serial numbers tell the whole story.
 

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Based on the time spent on each car, it sure sounds like just a serial number check. Toyota must sure be convinced the serial numbers tell the whole story.
Seems like a pretty Secret Squirrel way of simply verifying numbers according to the PDF Spaceballs posted. Hopefully these numbers are retained by Toyota so if there should ever be an expansion of this recall, they won't need to be looked at again.
 

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Lol, if it’s just checking numbers it should be pretty fast. My Subaru had a recall where they had to look up the date code on the plastic turbo inlet pipe. The turbo is buried down low by the crankshaft pulley, so the car had to be lifted to check this. Still it only took 15 mins to complete. Had to come another day for the part to come to replace it though.

Ok, odd to reply to your own post, but I looked up the procedure for checking the Block ID Number on the bottom side of the engine block and looks to be a PITA on the AWD models as the transfer case is in the way. The dealers are instructed to first clean the area and then to use a camera endoscope to find and take a picture of it.

It's not a simple procedure of opening the hood and reading some numbers on the side of the block as I previously thought and can see how this could take some time. Not sure if it was posted before, but here it is. https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/rcl/2020/RCRIT-20V064-6360.pdf

Too bad they couldn't correlate the Block ID Number to VINs as they could have saved a lot of time of owners and dealerships to not have to inspect 44,000+ cars/blocks and just focus in on the 250 bad blocks.
 

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Maybe they did? What’s frustrating Toyota won’t tell me what the ssc involved or list the results of any tests on my paperwork.
The manager spoke of how they’re getting out in front of this by replacing the 250. That great. That’s also a great way to admit some level of fault and then hope to replace a few thousand more quietly as they fail when nobody is paying attention anymore. Obviously I’m annoyed because I have that shudder thing that I won’t shut up about.

View attachment 149933
What is the shudder thing?

If it's that bad why dont you sell and move on?

Such a small number of units affected here. Cant believe the sky is falling
 

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I just checked the Toyota and US recall website. My new 2019 that I bought in February 2020 shows zero recalls. Hopefully this is good.

The US recall page says "Recall data refreshed on Mar 07,2020"

Does anyone know the time period that the defective engines were made or know how to fully read the Toyota VIN number?

 

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From what I read Toyota selected 4 engines from 37,000, not 250. "Toyota conducted four durability tests using engines that were assembled with engine blocks from the suspect production period." Funny, they don't say they selected 4 engines from the 250 suspect ones. If they did they would have said it!!!! Toyota then ran a durability test on them by running the crap out of them resulting in 3 failures (2 leaks and 1 thrown connecting rod which destroyed the engine).

So, it appears that if you own one of the 31,000 gas or 6,000 Hybrid you may have to do the same in order find out if your engine has a "durability" defect. Otherwise, you could be sitting on a ticking time bomb with an engine that never fails, fails within the 3 years 36,000 miles warranty or fails ten years from now.

I don't think Toyota knows specifically which 250 vehicles are defective or if the 250 number is accurate. It's just their guess. If Toyota really knows then they should just publish the 250 engine block numbers and be done with it. Toyota is being very slick and may get away with an expensive disaster. Is my conclusion correct? Knowing all this would you buy one of the 37,000, either new or used?

Here's a video from Scotty Kilmer from yesterday who talks about this issue in his first segment.
 

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If I had one made in Cambridge or Georgetown even close to the suspected time frame, I'd be concerned!
Only time will tell if the engine block failures will affect 250 or 30,000 rav4’s from the production run last year. From Toyota’s description they seem resolute that the number of cars affected will be nearer to 250 vs. 30,000. Between the voluntary recall and just road time over the 3 year warranty period for vehicles manufactured in the noted production period, we should either see a lot of engine failures or not. For those of us with Rav4’s that dont get recalled but are in the affected production time period, it may make sense to get an extended warranty when the original 3 year warranty is about to expire. If Toyota wanted to build customer loyalty, they should expand the warranty period at no cost to affected customers.
 

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Our 2020 Camry hybrid LE is affected. I will have to wait until a solution becomes available.


Title
SAFETY RECALL 20TA04 (Interim Notice 20TB04) - Multiple Models - Certain Engine Blocks May Experience Coolant Leakage Causing Engine Stall (non-hybrid) and/or Fire Risk
Status
Remedy Not Available
Description
Some of the subject vehicles may be equipped with an engine block that was manufactured incorrectly. This issue may cause coolant to leak internally and/or externally during normal engine operation. This can lead to engine noise, engine smoke, warning lights/malfunction indicator illumination, an audible chime sounding, and/or, in some cases, engine overheating and possible internal mechanical engine damage. If this occurs in a conventional gasoline vehicle, it is possible the vehicle could stall while driving at higher speeds without prior warning, increasing the risk of a crash. For both hybrid and conventional gasoline vehicles, the mechanical engine damage could cause engine oil to leak, which, in the presence of an ignition source, can lead to an increased risk of fire. NOTE : If the engine stalls in a hybrid vehicle , the vehicle will enter a fail safe driving mode, allowing the driver to operate the vehicle at reduced power for certain distances to maneuver the vehicle to a safe location.
Remedy
Toyota is currently preparing the remedy. When the remedy is available, Toyota dealers will inspect the engine block casting serial number to determine if it is involved. In the cases where an involved engine block is identified, dealers will replace the engine including the engine block with a new one FREE OF CHARGE to customers.
I traded my hybrid highlander 2017 in for a xse 2020 that will arrive mid April, I received a letter from Toyota that my highlander needed be inspected for a possible leaking oil cooler pipe they replaced it without any cost. 3 weeks prior I noticed that the engine was making
a leaking exhaust noise , looking underneath I did see a 2” strip hanging in the middle of the car ,I reached it with my gloves on noticed that the bracket was separated From the exhaust pipe causing a hole about 3/4” . I was just over 60k but they replace the entire
exhaust incl . the Catalic converter. Now reading the problems with the RAV 4
i don’t know if I made a good choice
 

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Only time will tell if the engine block failures will affect 250 or 30,000 rav4’s from the production run last year. From Toyota’s description they seem resolute that the number of cars affected will be nearer to 250 vs. 30,000. Between the voluntary recall and just road time over the 3 year warranty period for vehicles manufactured in the noted production period, we should either see a lot of engine failures or not. For those of us with Rav4’s that dont get recalled but are in the affected production time period, it may make sense to get an extended warranty when the original 3 year warranty is about to expire. If Toyota wanted to build customer loyalty, they should expand the warranty period at no cost to affected customers.
I was about to buy a limited this pass Sunday but I can’t seem to go forward had a great price on it ran the Vin. Number for this came back at 0 I’m either waiting for the RAV4 Prime or might go for the Subaru Forester Touring
 

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My guess is that Toyota is just accumulating data now and that, over time, after real world failures accumulate, they expect to be able to identify the pool of suspect vehicles more accurately. I doubt Toyota is changing any engines now, or even in the future, unless there is an actual failure/leak or people start dying/injured from failures leading to accidents. All 40,000 vehicles are currently within warranty so Toyota probably feels they have time to figure this out. How Toyota is handling this now though, imo, is BS. They are putting 40,000 owners out of their way....for what? To accumulate VINs and engine block numbers? And then the owners go on their merry way thinking their car has cleared recall because it's not one of the so-called 250 bad ones? I've never watched a recall unfold like this before. I find it devious and unseemly. Toyota should be more forthcoming with what they are doing. The NHTSA should do more too. Publish the bad engine block numbers so all can see!!!!!!! I suspect they won't because they have no idea which 250 are bad....or if it's really 40,000. Imagine the cost of changing 40,000 engines? $250 million? Ouch.
 
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