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Well you can proobobly buy a can of peppermint oil much cheaper.
I once got a pint of esential oil for like 30 bucks. Since you need to delute it with water for even spraying it can last for like a year.
 

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Hello everyone. On 7/2/2020 I was driving to work and 3 dashboard warning lights came on, so I drove straight to Toyota service. They said a rodent caused damage by eating wire casings. $1,400 and 2 days later, I got my 2007 RAV4 back. I Googled how to keep the critters out of engine and found suggestions from peppermint, to cedar wood blocks, to mothballs, to spraying the engine bay with a cayanne pepper mixture. I also read to wash engine bay to rid of any waste rodents may have left so they are not attracted to return and to then spray the clean engine bay with deterrent.
There is lots of info on the internet about washing the engine bay. I’ve been reading and watching lots of YouTube videos. Some say to cover parts such as the air flow sensor, exposed electricals, air filter, alternator (all of it Greek to me) others say you don’t really need to cover anything in cars made after 1996.
Do you guys know if there are any engine parts in the 2007 RAV4 V6 that must be covered/protected before I wash it?
If yes, please let me know and idea of where they are. Keep in mind that I am a woman who knows very little about cars, but I am a little bit of a DIY.
I’m going to use some GUNK product and I’m using a garden hose with the shower spray.
Your help will be much appreciated.
Had a similar problem last year. Squirrel climb up and chewed an ignition coil wire
 

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Rats ate $600 of my Polaris Ranger ignition harness. There are various poisons at the hardware store. Just sayin’.
 

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Hello everyone. On 7/2/2020 I was driving to work and 3 dashboard warning lights came on, so I drove straight to Toyota service. They said a rodent caused damage by eating wire casings. $1,400 and 2 days later, I got my 2007 RAV4 back. I Googled how to keep the critters out of engine and found suggestions from peppermint, to cedar wood blocks, to mothballs, to spraying the engine bay with a cayanne pepper mixture. I also read to wash engine bay to rid of any waste rodents may have left so they are not attracted to return and to then spray the clean engine bay with deterrent.
There is lots of info on the internet about washing the engine bay. I’ve been reading and watching lots of YouTube videos. Some say to cover parts such as the air flow sensor, exposed electricals, air filter, alternator (all of it Greek to me) others say you don’t really need to cover anything in cars made after 1996.
Do you guys know if there are any engine parts in the 2007 RAV4 V6 that must be covered/protected before I wash it?
If yes, please let me know and idea of where they are. Keep in mind that I am a woman who knows very little about cars, but I am a little bit of a DIY.
I’m going to use some GUNK product and I’m using a garden hose with the shower spray.
Your help will be much appreciated.
Claudia: Sorry to hear about your damage and related bill. This happened to two of my vehicles decades ago and my vehicles were as old as yours is now. You must live near an area with trees where there are squirrels and rats that may live under an outside shed or deck where rats and mice and even rabbits can make there home. These are all rodents. So you can do a few things, but let me explain what attracted the rodents to get into your engine compartment. I have not met many folks who had the problem with a new vehicle, 99% of the time it is with older vehicles. Rodents are attracted by the sweet smell of antifreeze and with age your vehicle has radiator leaks that spill below your vehicle and boil over on the engine block. All rodents eat the insulation off wires, even your dog or cat would do that. Engine heat in the winter makes the engine are a warm location as well, but it is the antifreeze.

What I did, I bought bait traps from Lowes that contain toxic amounts of Vitamin D that kills the mice and rats that eat it, problem is if you have a pet like a cat or dog and it gets a hold of a dead rodent, your pet will not live long because rodents and canine animals cannot digest Vitamin D from those traps either. Next either fix the antifreeze leaks by replacing radiators, water pumps, hoses, and connections, and steam clean the engine compartment, or look for a new RAV4 like the new 2020 Hybrid. As long as you have anti-freeze leaks and live in the same area, the problem may re-occur.

The anti-freeze attracts the rodents and they just chew into everything and will eventually die from it, but rats and squirrels are like ant colonies.



Steps to Take
  1. Leave the hood up. ...
  2. Hide your dog food, cat food, and birdseed. ...
  3. Remove or seal off rat hiding places near the car. ...
  4. Block small entrances to the vehicle engine compartment. ...
  5. Use electronic deterrent devices. ...
  6. Make your engine and its entrances smell bad, at least to rats. ...
  7. Do not let the car sit unused.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Claudia: Sorry to hear about your damage and related bill. This happened to two of my vehicles decades ago and my vehicles were as old as yours is now. You must live near an area with trees where there are squirrels and rats that may live under an outside shed or deck where rats and mice and even rabbits can make there home. These are all rodents. So you can do a few things, but let me explain what attracted the rodents to get into your engine compartment. I have not met many folks who had the problem with a new vehicle, 99% of the time it is with older vehicles. Rodents are attracted by the sweet smell of antifreeze and with age your vehicle has radiator leaks that spill below your vehicle and boil over on the engine block. All rodents eat the insulation off wires, even your dog or cat would do that. Engine heat in the winter makes the engine are a warm location as well, but it is the antifreeze.

What I did, I bought bait traps from Lowes that contain toxic amounts of Vitamin D that kills the mice and rats that eat it, problem is if you have a pet like a cat or dog and it gets a hold of a dead rodent, your pet will not live long because rodents and canine animals cannot digest Vitamin D from those traps either. Next either fix the antifreeze leaks by replacing radiators, water pumps, hoses, and connections, and steam clean the engine compartment, or look for a new RAV4 like the new 2020 Hybrid. As long as you have anti-freeze leaks and live in the same area, the problem may re-occur.

The anti-freeze attracts the rodents and they just chew into everything and will eventually die from it, but rats and squirrels are like ant colonies.



Steps to Take
  1. Leave the hood up. ...
  2. Hide your dog food, cat food, and birdseed. ...
  3. Remove or seal off rat hiding places near the car. ...
  4. Block small entrances to the vehicle engine compartment. ...
  5. Use electronic deterrent devices. ...
  6. Make your engine and its entrances smell bad, at least to rats. ...
  7. Do not let the car sit unused.
Thanks for your message. Toyota service did not mention any leaks of anti-freeze and my car gets serviced every six months. I’ve not neglected any service or repairs suggested. I’ve not seen any leak stains on my driveway. Toyota service said this just happens because rodents like to chew. I live in the Southern U.S. and it’s summer and it has been raining a lot and we have relatively mild winters. I have taken multiple steps to try and kill and deter the crittera. I bought and placed rodent bait stations on the driveway and around my property. I have been spraying the engine bay with Exterminators Choice Rodent Vehicle Repellent nightly. I am also spraying it on the wheels area. I added peppermint oil coated baggies. And every night I place a bag of mothballs in the engine compartment and I remove it in the morning. I don’t think there’s much else to do. I don’t want to use poison because there are stray cats in my neighborhood which I don’t want to hurt.
 

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I don't like the bait stations. One of my dogs (Boston Terrier) killed a mouse that eat one of those baits put by a neighbor. We cam home to find our dog in shock, barely breathing, in a pool of vomit. She died on the way to the vet.

I use only glue traps. Or, more recently... the cat.
 

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I pretty much do the following instead of steam cleaning when I will not be using car right away and in morning before using..

1. use a battery operated leaf blower to blow everything out.

2. use all purpose cleaner on plastic, rubber, and metal.

3. Hose every thing down on high pressure, avoid battery with water.

4. Use a silicon base protectant wit UV protection on all plastic and rubber and buff to a shine. I use Torque Detail, plastic restorer, same as all my exterior plastic and rubber trim on my RAV4.

Been doing this to my vehicles for past 10 years and always do well in trade ins. My new 2019 RAV4 is what you see after 13 months. I clean interior and exterior once a week and the engine compartment monthly just using a shop vac and leaf blower and plastic restorer. If I lived in North or drove in dust area, I would use the above procedure. Waiting 10 years, I recommend the two videos.

Hope this answers your question
Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I don't like the bait stations. One of my dogs (Boston Terrier) killed a mouse that eat one of those baits put by a neighbor. We cam home to find our dog in shock, barely breathing, in a pool of vomit. She died on the way to the vet.

I use only glue traps. Or, more recently... the cat.
That’s horrible! I’ve no pets and neither do any of my neighbors. There are some stray cats but I’m hoping for the best. I understand that the glue traps are dangerous to other animals and I can’t see myself picking one up with a dead animal on it!
 

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That’s horrible! I’ve no pets and neither do any of my neighbors. There are some stray cats but I’m hoping for the best. I understand that the glue traps are dangerous to other animals and I can’t see myself picking one up with a dead animal on it!
You can buy mouse traps where the mice go into a baited plastic container and you don't have to see the dead mice. If you still are wary of handling the traps you can buy one of those grab assist tools to pick up the traps and dispose of them without having to handle them. Hopefully a link for the traps: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Tomcat-Mouse-Killer-Child-Resistant-Disposable-Station-4-Preloaded-Stations/154711278?athcpid=154711278&athpgid=athenaItemPage&athcgid=null&athznid=PWVUB&athieid=v0&athstid=CS020&athguid=32acc690-008-1733e5ebc57afe&athancid=null&athena=true

Best of luck so that you don't have that harness replacement expense again!
 

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I don't like the bait stations. One of my dogs (Boston Terrier) killed a mouse that eat one of those baits put by a neighbor. We cam home to find our dog in shock, barely breathing, in a pool of vomit. She died on the way to the vet.

I use only glue traps. Or, more recently... the cat.
Sonic, I am so sorry to hear that. Two Boston terriers have owned me; one is still with me. Great dogs, and my heart breaks for what happened to your girl.
 

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Sonic, I am so sorry to hear that. Two Boston terriers have owned me; one is still with me. Great dogs, and my heart breaks for what happened to your girl.
Same thing happened to us exactly as you say, which is why I said if you have pets, forget the vitamin D Rat traps. Our 10 year old died within a couple days after it got a rat, and died on my son’s lap on the way to the vet hospital. Neighbor pets should not be on your property Craping on your lawn.
 

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I observed mouse love mung beans & have caught 9 so far this year in my garage with a $2 trap.
Sounds like a sort of invasion! Is it possible to seal garage entrance points to prevent mouse entries? I have used steel wool, etc. to close up possible entrance points in ours and so far our neighbor's cat also has been very helpful.
 
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