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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just purchased a 2009 RAV CV and was hoping to mount a rooftop tent. My one doesn't have the roof rails but does appear to have the mounting points. Can anyone please provide advice on dynamic weight limits and use of cross bars? I have found possible cross bars to purchase, however, my main concern is the distance from the mounting points making it difficult to attach the tent.

Also if anyone can provide any specific information on where to find Toyota's figures for static and dynamic weigh limits, have looked through owner's manual and various forums but no exact answer.

Thank you in advance.
 

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I have just purchased a 2009 RAV CV and was hoping to mount a rooftop tent. My one doesn't have the roof rails but does appear to have the mounting points. Can anyone please provide advice on dynamic weight limits and use of cross bars? I have found possible cross bars to purchase, however, my main concern is the distance from the mounting points making it difficult to attach the tent.

Also if anyone can provide any specific information on where to find Toyota's figures for static and dynamic weigh limits, have looked through owner's manual and various forums but no exact answer.

Thank you in advance.
The max listed weight for the factory roof rack system is 100 pounds, per the manual. I presume this to be the dynamic limit. I haven’t seen a static number yet, and I think you’d need different cross bars - the Toyota ones are arched and wouldn’t work well for a platform.


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The max listed weight for the factory roof rack system is 100 pounds, per the manual. I presume this to be the dynamic limit. I haven’t seen a static number yet, and I think you’d need different cross bars - the Toyota ones are arched and wouldn’t work well for a platform.


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But if I used some good quality heavy duty roof racks and cross bars it would be more suitable? My main concern is the roof itself. Thanks heaps for your reply
 

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But if I used some good quality heavy duty roof racks and cross bars it would be more suitable? My main concern is the roof itself. Thanks heaps for your reply
As I understand it, the rails make contact to the structure, not the roof panel. That would allow the load to transfer into stronger pieces. This would be part of the safety cage, if this is accurate, which means a static load could do better. Remember though that the rails are plastic/metal and may or may not be up to the task. I think we’ve had other members use the roof tents but I don’t recall hearing much about that. These were built before the roof tent concept really took off - it’s much more popular now than it was during our production run, so there’s little to no consideration for our models.


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Roof-mounted tents mean doubling up on insulation, as being off the ground makes you a heat sink: Great for Summer camp, but a bummer in other seasons when it gets cold. Better pack a Buddy heater and Marmot down sleeping bags!
 

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Sorry, but as a 40-year retired science professional, I must remind you of the Zeroeth Law of Thermodynamics. Solids exchange heat the slowest, then gas, then liquid. You need much less insulation on the ground. This is why hammocks and big hollow-tube air mattresses are for summer/home us and not cold-weather camping. Self-inflating sleeping pads have tiny cells that slow the heat exchange, the US military switched to them long ago. Just take a heater, or more insulation along and enjoy those summer breezes!
 

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Being on cold ground will pull heat faster than being in the air.
Liquid transfers heat the fastest, gas is slower, and the slowest rate is with a solid. Weren't you in class for the ice in net over liquid demonstration? I have the notes here. Bring extra blankets and long underwear! Self-inflating sleeping pads on the ground provide the slowest rate of heat transfer from you to the great ooutdoors.Happy Trails!
 

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Being on cold ground will pull heat faster than being in the air.
But not if you use a self inflating ground pad. like a Big Agnes Air Core. I used to backpack in early/late Winter (did Appalachian Trail - 2280 miles). Those combined with a down bag will let you sleep comfortably to near zero... and even below with low temperature rated bag.
 
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