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I have an I4 4x4 Limited. My last 2 fill ups have resulted in an average of about 20mpg...that's with probably 35% highway, 65% city. That seems awfully low considering that it's rated at 23/27. Can I expect much better mileage after the car breaks in more (currently at 1K) or once the weather warms up (currently below freezing most of the time)? One of the main reasons I traded in my 4Runner for this car was for the improved mileage, but this is really not much better than what I got with the 4Runner.
 

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After about 2 or 3 thousands miles, the mileage will be as good as it gets, You may see maybe 1 MPG more after break in, but dont expect that much. They say with your first 2 tank full, you will get the worst mileage, after that it gets better.
If you are in a cold weather region, the gasoline you are using probably has alot of alcohol in the winter months. When they switch over to the warm weather blend, you should see maybe another 1 MPG improvment.
 
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bbates said:
Hmmm...doesn't sound great. Oh well, thanks G Man.
you should see up to 15% better mpg in the city when warmer, because your engine wont have to idle higher to warm up.

What mpg did you get with 4runner?
 

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spwolfx said:
bbates said:
Hmmm...doesn't sound great. Oh well, thanks G Man.
you should see up to 15% better mpg in the city when warmer, because your engine wont have to idle higher to warm up.

What mpg did you get with 4runner?
15% higher would get me up to 23, so that would be much better! Also, my heater has been blowing air like crazy lately, so maybe that will help when it doesn't have to work as hard.

I was getting around 18mpg with the 4Runner V6 (when not in 4WD).
 

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19.9 mpg on city, first tank and going uphill and downhill... mine is 4wd... That is better compared with the 8.5 mpg at my Grand Cherokee 93 4x4 all the time.
 

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[Can I expect much better mileage after the car breaks in more (currently at 1K) or once the weather warms up (currently below freezing most of the time)?quote]

Yes to both. Number 1 - Make sure you follow the manufacturer's recommended break-in period procedures.

Number 2 - Your gas mileage will really suffer in freezing temperatures (the colder it is, the worse it is). In the summer my 4cyl Camry will give me approx. 600kms of driving before a fill-up is required. In the winter, driving the same mix of city/highway, I may manage 400kms while driving the same number kilometers. Highway driving will always be better (even in the winter). This has been my experience with every vehicle I have owned since 1971. Good Luck.
 

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no. The heater fan is the only part of 'heat' that draws any power from the engine. Such a small amount that Im sure gas mileage is not effected. BUT ac on the other hand. The compressor draws a few horsepower. Depending on how hot it is (how much the compressor cycles on) the ac can effect gas milage. but with todays compressor designs its not nearly as bad as the old days. Id say that running the ac around town vs, driving with the windows open may make gas mileage suffer 1-2 mpg max. BUT in the highway runnign with windows down and ac on with windows up is a wash.


bbates said:
flyingn said:
The heater does not use gas..
OK, dumb question but doesn't the heater affect your gas mileage like using the AC does?
 

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If it's the heater only, then it shouldn't affect your gas mileage. But, if it's heater with A/C (to help dehumidfy the cabin) then that might have a small effect.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong since I haven't worked on a car in a long time (I imagine the process is still the same), but the heat is generated from the heated coolant that flows into the heater core and then the heater blower blows over the core into the air vents into the cabin. That's why if your vehicle is overheating, the best way to help it cool down is to also run the heater.

Anyway, we've gotten about 23 mpg...mostly city. Ours is a 4x2 though.
 

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you are correct KUJ..



kuj said:
If it's the heater only, then it shouldn't affect your gas mileage. But, if it's heater with A/C (to help dehumidfy the cabin) then that might have a small effect.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong since I haven't worked on a car in a long time (I imagine the process is still the same), but the heat is generated from the heated coolant that flows into the heater core and then the heater blower blows over the core into the air vents into the cabin. That's why if your vehicle is overheating, the best way to help it cool down is to also run the heater.

Anyway, we've gotten about 23 mpg...mostly city. Ours is a 4x2 though.
 

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first tank 19.9mpg, second tank 21.5... same conditions on a not so good city roads. 8) probably on my next long trip I will expend less than a half I used with my Grand cherokee....
 

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In the 4.3 (4x4), I get between 24 and 28 mpg in the daily driving, dipping to 22 when I have to visit San Francisco.

I used to live in Fremont, California (a typical American one-floor town) and commuted about 15 minutes one way in a Neon. The mileage was atrocious - about 16 to 20 mpg. Any fuel injected engine burns way more when it's cold. Plus, the city driving. When I moved to the true suburbia, mileage jumped to 36 mpg.

I would not be surprised if RAV4 got way below the EPA "City" mileage if driven short distances with long stops. Highway estimate seems right on the money, as usual.
 
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Welcome all to the poor mpg club! Resourcing this website should have informed everybody ahead of time that the 4-cylinder RAV is a gas guzzler. I knew that but still had to buy the previous 2005 for the wife. I traded my V8 Tundra that got 21mpg on trips with the tailgate down. Now that's amazing! Plus, it was a bigger/safer vehicle that would accelerate like a demon. Of course, I'm now in her old 2004 Corolla getting 32/38mpg. It's a shame the RAV cute-ute can't do better. Every other vehicle I've owned (including the Tundra) could make mileage better than the sticker. Also. the RAV is still anemic in the acceleration department, no matter what anybody says about the bigger 4 banger. Get the V6 folks...or hold out for the hybrid.
 

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don't jump the gun Rav4her. We get 30 mpg on the highway with a 4wd 4.. 18 was the WORST city mpg and that was in 20 degree temps and short 3 mile trips in the city.. I would not call that a gas guzzler.. would you??

Now my Suzuki XL7 is a gas guzzler. 15 mpg in the city and 23 BEST mpg on the highway..
 
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Hey flyingn,
I know you want to defend your new purchase and I too am quite happy with our 2005 RAV overall. It's just gnaws at me psychologically that a 4 cylinder on a bad day at 18mpg gets close to what my V8 Tundra did every day: 16-17mpg without fail - in town - no matter what.

And, you may not appreciate what that Lexus derived V8 was capable of; also what a downgrade it was to a 2.4 liter RAV motor. It was not a sloppy American V8 like Consumer Reports always talks about regarding Fords,Chevys,etc.. It was a Lexus motor with 4 valves per cylinder and would make passenger's head tap back against their headrest every time I eased away from a stop light. Then there was the blistering acceleration at highway speeds going from 55 to 75 within moments to pass someone. The RAV just makes a lot of clatter and barely moves in that maneuver. I also loved merging in front of freight trucks on the highway with no fear. You just can't do that with an I-4 RAV. But, it is a Snow Cat and it is a Toyota.

Regardless of bad mpg days - Your 4.3 version was a wise purchase I concede.
 

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RAV4HER said:
Welcome all to the poor mpg club! Resourcing this website should have informed everybody ahead of time that the 4-cylinder RAV is a gas guzzler.
When we talk about the highway fuel burn, with a computer controlled fuel injected engine, the displacement is far from being the most important factor affecting the economy, and the number of cylinders has no bearing on the economy whatsoever. To be sure, displacement has some effect, this is why Chrysler 300C SRT-8 has a mode which switches off half of its cylinders. But basic things like the frontal cross-section of the vehicle and the speed are more important by far.

As other poster mentioned already, comparing best-case mileage for Tundra with the worst-case mileage for RAV4 was an underhanded way to discuss the subject, or simply trolling the forum.

As for the Corolla, it is remarkable how little it could improve on, for example, Neon - which has a 2.0L developed in early 90s. Neon gets 36mpg, Corolla gets 40mpg rating. Why is such minor fraction of improvement? Remember that 4 mpg on top of 20 is a much bigger improvement than the same on top of 36. It happens because the aerodinamic quality of a compact car is hard to improve without the drastic measures, such as significant lowering. Newest Corolla scrapped these mpgs together by playing with skirts and staying narrow.

RAV4 is wide and tall by comparison, and an SUV can have no skirts, so the aerodynamics of the bottom are always bad. Getting 28mpg out of this handicap is a miracle and a tribute to its lightweight construction. Have anyone seen mpg of Liberty? That's what you get for being somewhat heavier and sitting on top of a traditional 4x4 drive.
 
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You did fail understand that the V8 Tundra city mileage was not a "best case" scenario. It was achieved every day over 4 years.
It's a good Toyota product and so is the RAV.
 
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