Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I believe this is what is happening. If you open the door without shutting off the car(limited with push button start) it starts beeping at you. Understandable, I’m glad there is that warning, especially with the hybrid. However, it should stop beeping at you when the car is shut off. I often open the door and shut the car off at, or about, the same time. So the car is off but I still get the steady beeping until the door is shut again. Very annoying!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,936 Posts
Tis frustrating, but I deal with it by just hitting the start button to cycle it on and off again, then the beeps stop and I can lock it up. My best friend has an '11 4.3 Ltd, he taught me that, his does it regularly as well when things aren't done quite right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Just reach out and press the door switch. Beeping stops and doesn't beep again when you stop pressing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
That one does suck. As a fellow cold weather person I find the "warning ice" notification I get, EVERY, SINGLE, TIME I start the car in the winter. It is -10 out, ya I know its cold.

That and the STUPID gas notifications. We have a gas gauge that tells me if I'm empty, then a light comes on when I'm low. I also get a notification on the center gauge cluster screen that I am low on gas, then to top it off it lets me know AGAIN on my my screen. All of which I now have to take my eyes off the road to turn off. Drives me bonkers. Do we seriously need FOUR notifications to let me know when I need gas? GTFO
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,427 Posts
Do we seriously need FOUR notifications to let me know when I need gas? GTFO
AAAAND when the light comes on you still have a good 60 miles left, and when it hits "E" there's a good 30.
I've been well below E a number of times on my Corolla and still never put in more than 12 or so gallons (tank is 13.2)

Just reach out and press the door switch. Beeping stops and doesn't beep again when you stop pressing.
Ditto.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
Funny. This just happened to me the 1st time yesterday. There is absolutely no need to keep beeping after the car was shut off. It is irritating wondering what the heck the problem is, and pointless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yeah I usually hit the switch but it’s stupid that it keeps going after the car was off. And yes the roads may be slippery warning is also annoying. Even more so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
It only does it for the driver's door. For the passenger door it beeps once or twice and stops.

I've never understood trying to run out of gasoline. I fill up in the 1/4-1/5 range, maybe once in a great while down to 1/8. But an emergency could come up at any time so I try to keep above 1/4 at all times. It makes no sense not to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
197 Posts
It only does it for the driver's door. For the passenger door it beeps once or twice and stops.

I've never understood trying to run out of gasoline. I fill up in the 1/4-1/5 range, maybe once in a great while down to 1/8. But an emergency could come up at any time so I try to keep above 1/4 at all times. It makes no sense not to.
My laziness outweighs all logic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
The fuel pump is submerged in gasoline, and is cooled by it. More fuel, more cooling. Personally, I treat the 1/4 tank left line as the EMPTY line. It costs the same to by gas 10 gallons at a time as it does to buy it 15 gallons at a time. Both are cheaper than fuel pumps.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,936 Posts
https://parksidemotors.ca/dont-run-your-tank-empty-fact-or-myth/


Don’t Run Your Tank Empty: Fact or Myth?














There is a ton of false information out there. Some of it is misguided, and some of it is just left over from when vehicles were made in a different way to completely different regulations. This new post format is going to pose these questions to our top tier technicians to find out once and for all if they are FACT or MYTH.

Don’t run your gas tank empty, it will clog your fuel pump (!?)

If you are a millennial or Gen Xer, there is a very good chance that your father taught you to NEVER run your gas tank completely empty because it would clog up your fuel pump and you would shorten the life of your engine components. We have heard this many times ourselves, and we understand why it would be a concern, since fuel pump replacement is not a trivial repair. The real question is, though, does this sentiment hold true today?
Nearly every vehicle on the road has a fuel pump inside the gas tank. This is true. This fuel pump is located right down at the bottom of the tank to ensure that it can get every last drop of fuel from the tank should you run dry. It is also true that your fuel tank could have dirt and debris in it, possibly from a corroding fuel tank, or condensation accumulating after many short trips around the neighbourhood. When you combine these two truths though, does that mean the dirt and debris will clog your fuel pump if you run your tank dry?

MYTH! (mostly)

Your Dad may have been right to avoid a low fuel tank in vehicles from his generation. Many were manufactured with less sophisticated rust protection and fuel tanks would begin to corrode and rust way sooner than they ever would today. Fuel pumps were also less advanced and were more prone to getting clogged. Today, modern fuel pumps have a protective screen or porous sock-like cover that catches any contaminants before they enter the fuel system, and any tiny bits that might get through would normally be caught by a second filter closer to the engine. Even if these filters were not in place, all of the dirt and debris would get into the fuel pump even on a full tank, since they sink to the bottom of the tank where the fuel pump resides anyway.
One thing to note is that your fuel pump is lubricated and cooled by the fuel that passes through it. This means that while it may be ok to wait for the fuel light before filling up, it is not a good practice to run your tank completely dry to the point of engine failure. Running bone dry is one way to cause premature fuel pump failure. The good news is that the “low fuel” light comes on when there’s anywhere from 4-8 litres left in reserve, which is plenty to keep the pump safe while you get to a gas station.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Can it hurt things to drive 20-30 miles past the low fuel light? Maybe not. That's a debatable point. It may never hurt anything. But it may. Maybe. Possibly. Could be.

Kind of like the kid with the broken leg who said but I was fine the first 83 times I jumped off the roof.

Can it hurt things to fill up in the 1/4, 1/5, 1/8 full range? Nope. Never. Ever. Even after jumping off the roof 8,342 times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
That one does suck. As a fellow cold weather person I find the "warning ice" notification I get, EVERY, SINGLE, TIME I start the car in the winter. It is -10 out, ya I know its cold.

That and the STUPID gas notifications. We have a gas gauge that tells me if I'm empty, then a light comes on when I'm low. I also get a notification on the center gauge cluster screen that I am low on gas, then to top it off it lets me know AGAIN on my my screen. All of which I now have to take my eyes off the road to turn off. Drives me bonkers. Do we seriously need FOUR notifications to let me know when I need gas? GTFO
Yeah, I'm with you on both points.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
The beeping is a bit of an annoyance when the car is off. Totally agree with OP but I get why the beeping is in place by Toyota.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,427 Posts
Thanks.

This myth, and variations of it, persist.

Fact is that modern fuel tanks are polymer. They don't rust.
Unless you are buying fuel in a different country, or from a station with extremely old equipment, those tanks are also polymer, AND the pumps are filtered.
I've seen tanks with 100k on them opened up and they are clean enough to eat out of.

The "fuel pump is cooled by fuel" is another one.
Yes, the fuel moving through the pump helps to cool it.
Not all pumps are submerged in the tank. Many GM products have the pump mounted to the top surface of the tank.
Of course, the pickup tube is at the bottom.
This myth started not long after GM started moving to electric fuel pumps. GM pumps had a reputation for failure... well into the early 2000's.
The "You ran your tank below 1/4" myth originated from dealerships using that as an excuse to avoid warranty repairs, and many customers fell for it.


No, you aren't going to hurt your Toyota by running until the light is on, or even until the gauge is on "E". When the light comes on, you generally have about 60-80 miles left, depending on the car. You can safely wait for the light and then look for gas.
Remember that on many motorcycles, all you have is the light (and you may be down to 10 miles at that point).
Yes, running until you are completely dry CAN cause damage to the pump and other parts of the emission system, including overheating the catalytic convertor due to the mixture leaning out before the engine dies.

Personally, I generally drive by the odometer with the light as a backup and plan on getting gas somewhere between 350 and 400 miles on my Corolla... usually around 1/8th.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top