Toyota RAV4 Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings All!

New Rav4 owner here (2006 Limited AWD 4cyl). My Rav came with snow tires but the current 'summer' tires are shot and the local tire place recommended replacing all 4 tires, but I am sort of at a crossroad and don't know which way to go. Since it is winter here in MN, I had them put on the snow tires for now (the snow tires do NOT have their own rims). So I can either. A.) Get another set of 'summer' tires and swap them out with the same set of rims. B.) Get another set of 'summer' tires and get a new set of rims. C.) Get a good set of 'All Season' and then just get rid of the snow tires. or D.) Anything else you come up with.

I have done some searching on this forum and online so I have an idea of what to do, but I'm just curious what other Rav owners do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I find it easier to have a set of winter tires on four wheels and summer tires on other wheels. Changing the wheels takes more than an hour. But it would be much, much worse if I had to break four beads, pry four tires off, and remount four other tires -- twice every year. No, I have a set for winter and another for summer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
If I lived in Minnesota I'd run Michelin X Ice year round. They are smooth on road with 3d Siped treads similar to my Premiers and excellent in winter obviously. Just swap them early around 40,000 miles and no new rims minus sensor, 2 sets of tire hassles. I'll be running Premier's year round and they are excellent in snow and ice (higher rated than many winter tires).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
I would NOT run winter tires all year round. The rubber in winter tires is soft at low temperatures for traction, but in the summer will wear down fast in the heat.

If I were to run only 1 set of tires, they would be Nokian WRG3 SUV tires. They're all-season, but do better in the snow than most all-season tiers.

However, I have two sets on separate rims:

Nokian Hakkapeliitta R2 SUV for the winter (may be the best non-studded winter tires money can buy) and Micheline Latitude Tour HP for the summer (*super* quiet, excellent in water, I believe one of the standard tires on luxury vehicles such as Lexus).

These have been working extremely well for me.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
I totally agree with DVS.
If you live in an area where you need winter tires have 2 sets of weels.
And Nokian is a very good choice for winter tires both studded and non-studded.
All season tires will always just be a compromise, not good for anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
I also highly recommend two sets, Option B.

I used one set all-season (Continental ProContact) for three years even through winter. When new, I felt they were good to marginally sufficient in winter. I evaluated performance in empty parking lot and snow driving situations to get a feeling for the limitations. At less than half-way point of wear (about 7/32) they were losing their grip. So I invested in dedicated winter tires (Nokian 7). AMAZING difference in traction. I probably should have gone with the two sets from the beginning.

More safety in winter, more time to 'use up' the remaining tread of my summer tires . I purchased at Discount Tire (Americas Tire) and they provide free swap over from summer to winter and back. This serves as tire rotation also.

All it takes is one severe winter driving season, and you will be glad for the increased winter traction--could prevent a crash. Winter tires brings less white-knuckle driving and actual smiles instead!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,017 Posts
Greetings All!

New Rav4 owner here (2006 Limited AWD 4cyl). My Rav came with snow tires but the current 'summer' tires are shot and the local tire place recommended replacing all 4 tires, but I am sort of at a crossroad and don't know which way to go. Since it is winter here in MN, I had them put on the snow tires for now (the snow tires do NOT have their own rims). So I can either. A.) Get another set of 'summer' tires and swap them out with the same set of rims. B.) Get another set of 'summer' tires and get a new set of rims. C.) Get a good set of 'All Season' and then just get rid of the snow tires. or D.) Anything else you come up with.

I have done some searching on this forum and online so I have an idea of what to do, but I'm just curious what other Rav owners do.
You are dealing with much of the classic "what kind of tires do I run in snow country" questions. Here is my take:

C-The reason for running only all seasons is that it is convenient and cost. However the bottom line is that even the best all seasons do not perform like an average winter specific tire. That one time you step on the brake and the ABS pulses as you are about to rear end the car in front of you stopped at the stop light, you will think to yourself: "I don't care how much money I have to spend, I wish I could stop right now." Or if you wife is driving your children around and it is icy as hell, money and ease are nothing when it comes to keeping them from sliding off the road into the river. What is your deductible? $500 $1000. I would rather spend the money up front on tires and not deal with the repairs/headache/injury of a potential accident. Finally if you run all seasons you will need to replace them much before the wear out in order to keep them safe for snow driving. A good example are the Conti Snow/Wet/Dry tire. Only the top thread is suited for snow do you buy new ones in the fall when it is at the wet level, the dry level.

A-Around here it cost $15 per tire to swap. $60 for 4. done twice a winter, that is $120. For the life of a car (say 10 years), that's $1200. You do the math on a second set of wheels. I typically wait till right before a forecasted storm to put on the winters; so does everyone else. Tire shops are often so impacted at this time that you can't get your tires swapped and slide around in that first snow storm. If I go all nascar on the swap it takes me 15min. Including rolling wheels, prep and clean up it is a one hour job. I have also added scrubbing the wheels before storage to get rid of the salt and dirt to keep the wheels rust/corrosion free (yes even on alloys).

B-This is essentially what I do. However I basically run old winter tires as summer tires. We run blizzaks which only have the sticky winter compound for the first 50% of the treadlife. THe last %50 are an allseason compound, that I will run through the summer. The "summer" tires often get pretty raged. In this case I might put the worn winters on and get a fresh set in the fall.

I would get a new set of wheels. As for what tires to put on that 2nd set of wheels...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
I would NOT run winter tires all year round. The rubber in winter tires is soft at low temperatures for traction, but in the summer will wear down fast in the heat.

If I were to run only 1 set of tires, they would be Nokian WRG3 SUV tires. They're all-season, but do better in the snow than most all-season tiers.

However, I have two sets on separate rims:

Nokian Hakkapeliitta R2 SUV for the winter (may be the best non-studded winter tires money can buy) and Micheline Latitude Tour HP for the summer (*super* quiet, excellent in water, I believe one of the standard tires on luxury vehicles such as Lexus).

These have been working extremely well for me.

.
Then I recommend to spend away and be without pressure sensors.

Fact is, they are an advanced blend that hold up well if you are not in high heat summer area, and people are doing it with great results and saving money.

Just a couple examples of reviewers that disagrees and has actually tried this.
Initial Review:
60,000 Miles on Tires
September 24, 2016
Although I bought these tires and new wheels for winter only, I have left them on for 3 solid years. Have not rotated them a single time and the wear has been even throughout. Bought them in September of 2013 and have over 60,000 miles on them. That's a lot of miles on a winter tread tire and only the rears need immediately replacement. Was shocked how well they worked in the snow. Lot of guys with 4WD pickups around here and even with snow past my axles, I drove comfortably where they were sliding and spinning. But the tires are just average on the dry and in wet weather they are squirrely and have been since I bought them. I take my time on wet roads because they break free rather easily. I understand they are snow tires meant for colder weather, but even here in PA, we have mostly wet roads in the winter. The two best attributes of the tire are long life and great snow and ice traction. Something they were designed for.

Initial Review:
30,000 Miles on Tires
September 21, 2016
Typical of a Michelin tire, low noise with long life. I run these year round rather than swapping tires for the warmer months. Overall they hold well but you can feel a bit of looseness when cornering hard in wet weather. Currently have about 30k on them and they are at about 5-6/32 so just enough to mostly make it through another winter. These do have to get rotated to help with wear as well as monitoring tire pressure to adjust how the tires wear. Chopping of the tires was minimal even with these being a directional tire. Noise was very quiet for a snow tire and even quieter than some all season tires and sport tires. With these on it in the snow I would much rather drive my vehicle which is front wheel drive over some other all wheel drive vehicles even with snow tires on them. Overall well worth the price as long as you actually take care of your vehicle.
TireRack.com Tire Reviews
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I have a 15 XLE with factory all season, and my 13 Limited with Michelin Xice.......Two totally different rides when its Snowing !

2 sets of tires and rims are the way to go......screw the sensors, they suck anyways !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
2 sets of tires and rims are the way to go......screw the sensors, they suck anyways !
Agreed, except I also had clonable TPMS sensors put in the second set of rims, so I always have TPMS working and all that is needed is to swap rims/tires in the spring and fall.

Easy-peasy, maximum performance and safety.

Did it cost more than cheaper options? Yes. But what's between me and the road is *extremely* important to me.

Worth. Every. Penny.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
I bit the bullet, getting TPMS sensors for $240 for my second set of wheels. I considered skipping it, but hate to see a neglected safety feature, even a somewhat lame one, lol. Eventually the financial pain subsided. Also, Discount Tire won't install tires without it on TPMS capable cars. They do the seasonal swaps and TPMS programming for free for life of the tires. That's a chore I prefer to skip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
While true winter tires are always best, there are two all-seasons which have passed tests rating them as winter-worthy, although not as good as the best winter tires. They are the Nokians mentioned above, and newer Toyo Celsius. I plan to invest in the Celsius when my current tires wear out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I've always been a strong believer in a dedicated winter tire/rim set and doing a DIY switch every season. There is a higher initial cost but both sets will last twice as long. Also mounting and dismounting tires every season is hard on the tire and rim.

As for sensors I'm lucky and my 08 Canadian sport didn't come with them so I don't have to worry but if it did I would be getting cloned sensors like others here have done. Then you can continue to DIY install every season.

I recommend you keep an eye on Craigslist and try to pick up someone's factory take off from a newer vehicle. You might get lucky and get a set of almost new alloys and tires for what you would spend on summer tires anyways or less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Had a chance to compare my Nokian snow tires on my '09 AWD with my friend's '11 AWD using all-season Yokohama Avids. To be fair, mine are new and hers are at 4/32-inch tread. Still street legal, but no comparison. She got stuck here while I blazed away at will creating new trails:




The battle to get out of the crud, onto the beaten path. Her RAV (not pictured here) floundered, but with momentum could at least slip-slide to the groove. Anytime she stopped in the crud, it was a risk to get stuck. Mine trudged ahead like a tank. Many, many stuck. No plans by the city to clear the subdivisions anytime soon:


The RAV is a worthy contender on snowy roads with the right gear (snow tires). Oh, and don't forget to use these buttons from time to time. The AWD will lock for speeds up to 25mph, perfect for the local roads:


And don't forget about the TRAC/VSC button located down by the cupholders and Magnetic Mary, available on RAVs starting in 2009. Push this to disable those Nannies which can cause your engine to bog down if temporarily stuck. Seems counter-intuitive, but push button to disable them for getting unstuck.


On the way:


News reports said "Avoid travel unless absolutely necessary."

"Absolutely necessary" (in the RAV), means this:



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Agreed, except I also had clonable TPMS sensors put in the second set of rims, so I always have TPMS working and all that is needed is to swap rims/tires in the spring and fall.

Easy-peasy, maximum performance and safety.

Did it cost more than cheaper options? Yes. But what's between me and the road is *extremely* important to me.

Worth. Every. Penny.

.

I get it, safety first and all but the toyota sensors are dumb. They dont go off with a 10 psi difference.
for me this is BS, My 11 Matrix and 06 Matrix never once did the TPSM warning light come on.
Ive always been in the habbit of checking my tire pressure, seeing them off and no warning light Pisses me off....Just my $.02

Now if they were like some of the Chevy Trucks that on your display panel will give you exact PSI numbers for each tire at a glance
then I would go for the extra $$$ to buy them.

Their not required in NH for safety inspections for now......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Had a chance to compare my Nokian snow tires on my '09 AWD with my friend's '11 AWD using all-season Yokohama Avids. To be fair, mine are new and hers are at 4/32-inch tread. Still street legal, but no comparison. She got stuck here while I blazed away at will creating new trails:




The battle to get out of the crud, onto the beaten path. Her RAV (not pictured here) floundered, but with momentum could at least slip-slide to the groove. Anytime she stopped in the crud, it was a risk to get stuck. Mine trudged ahead like a tank. Many, many stuck. No plans by the city to clear the subdivisions anytime soon:


The RAV is a worthy contender on snowy roads with the right gear (snow tires). Oh, and don't forget to use these buttons from time to time. The AWD will lock for speeds up to 25mph, perfect for the local roads:


And don't forget about the TRAC/VSC button located down by the cupholders and Magnetic Mary, available on RAVs starting in 2009. Push this to disable those Nannies which can cause your engine to bog down if temporarily stuck. Seems counter-intuitive, but push button to disable them for getting unstuck.


On the way:


News reports said "Avoid travel unless absolutely necessary."

"Absolutely necessary" (in the RAV), means this:




Nice Snow !! Looks like the skiing conditions are pretty good ! certainly could use some snow here in New Hampshire !!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top