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give this site a read...compelling argument to be made for their product vs all the denim that has been posted.
Interesting, but likely more relevant to vans vs where it’s being placed in our RAV4s. I doubt the inner door skin gets much (if any) condensation. It’s within the door, not the outer door skin or up against the actual wall of the van. The cloth seats in my cars have never gotten moldy. I don’t think cotton on the interior side of the car door would either.
 

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Interesting, but likely more relevant to vans vs where it’s being placed in our RAV4s. I doubt the inner door skin gets much (if any) condensation. It’s within the door, not the outer door skin or up against the actual wall of the van. The cloth seats in my cars have never gotten moldy. I don’t think cotton on the interior side of the car door would either.
while I agree with you, i never thought my brand new RAV would have water running down my A pillar the first day I got it either. :)

I'm not selling the stuff, but some folks might opt for a more "natural" sound/thermal insulator. Personally, I'd prefer to use an open cell foam and a some layers of sound deadener. Whatever they used in my Land Cruiser worked...because my RAV sounds like a rattle trap compared to my LC...but then again, another $50k gets you quiet, among other things.
 

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Has anyone tried "soundshield"?
Thickness: 4.5mm
Materials:
  • 3mm closed cell acoustic foam
  • Aluminum foil core
  • 1.5mm Butyl rubber
it seems like all in one solution
 

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Hey man I used it was really easy to work with it (I did two layers for the doors inner and outer) kilmat out and sound shield inner door

Has anyone tried "soundshield"?
Thickness: 4.5mm
Materials:
  • 3mm closed cell acoustic foam
  • Aluminum foil core
  • 1.5mm Butyl rubber
it seems like all in one solution
 

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Hey man I used it was really easy to work with it (I did two layers for the doors inner and outer) kilmat out and sound shield inner door
Thanks for the info.. I went for soundskins a bit cheaper and they seem like the same product under different name/brand.

Have you done sound test before and after? and what did you cover?
 

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Hi, I was wondering if you sprayed the wheel wells and if so how were the noise reduction results?
I sprayed the inner fender cover on the smooth side facing the tires and it helped reduce tire/road noise but not engine noise. The engine bay has a very thin noise insulator panel in front of the firewall which is the reason for so much noise leaking into the cabin. Not much can be done about that unfortunately.
 

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I sprayed the inner fender cover on the smooth side facing the tires and it helped reduce tire/road noise but not engine noise. The engine bay has a very thin noise insulator panel in front of the firewall which is the reason for so much noise leaking into the cabin. Not much can be done about that unfortunately.
This might be what I'm looking for. There's a section of freeway that I drive on that goes from concrete to asphalt.On the asphalt section almost all of the road noise goes away. How much tire/road noise did the spray reduce?
 

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I'm mostly done with a pretty extensive noise attenuation project. This thread was very helpful. I used four 36 square foot boxes of Noico 80 mil material in all 5 doors, the roof and under the hood. I also used two pieces (40"X80") of LINGDA 21.53 SqFT 10mm Heat Shield Thermal Sound Insulation Proofing Deadener Mat Car Noise Control Acoustic Dampening Moistureproof Waterproof material for all 5 doors and under the hood. I used the Lingda material since its closed cell so it won't absorb water. It was easy to work with- the alumimium foil covering is quite durable. Under the hood, I used Tyvek tape to cover the edges of the Lingda insulation to reduce water ingress and to make sure it stays in place. (As you can see in the pic, I ran short on Tyvek tape and need to get another roll.)

I live in a cold, damp climate (coastal Alaska) so condensation and humidity are a big concern, hence the choice of the more expensive Lingda insulation rather than denim. Plus I keep my vehicles for 10-15 years so I want to minimize the chances of corrosion.

I also ordered a box of Noico Red 150 mil but the stuff was so thin its not worth the money IMO. The Lingda is vastly superior! I wish I'd have used the Lingda in the roof.

Since there are lots of good pics in this thread already, I'll just add pics of one side door and the rear door trim pieces covered with the Lingda insulation as well as under the hood.


Here's a link to the Lingda insulation-
 

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I'm mostly done with a pretty extensive noise attenuation project. This thread was very helpful. I used four 36 square foot boxes of Noico 80 mil material in all 5 doors, the roof and under the hood. I also used two pieces (40"X80") of LINGDA 21.53 SqFT 10mm Heat Shield Thermal Sound Insulation Proofing Deadener Mat Car Noise Control Acoustic Dampening Moistureproof Waterproof material for all 5 doors and under the hood. I used the Lingda material since its close cell so it won't absorb water. It was easy to work with- the alumimium foil covering is quite durable. Under the hood, I used Tyvek tape to cover the edges of the Lingda insulation to reduce water ingress and to make sure it stays in place. (As you can see in the pic, I ran short on Tyvek tape and need to get another roll.)

I live in a cold, damp climate (coastal Alaska) so condensation and humidity are a big concern, hence the choice of the more expensive Lingda insulation rather than denim. Plus I keep my vehicles for 10-15 years so I want to minimize the chances of corrosion.

I also ordered a box of Noico Red 150 mil but the stuff was so thin its not worth the money IMO. The Lingda is vastly superior! I wish I'd have used the Lingda in the roof.

Since there are lots of good pics in this thread already, I'll just add pics of one side door and the rear door trim pieces covered with the Lingda insulation as well as under the hood.


Here's a link to the Lingda insulation-
Very nice. I've put Noico in the doors, the back spare tire area, and the back wheel wells. I've put denim in the doors and back wheel wells. I live in San Diego, it only rains here a few weeks of the year and there's isn't any snow.

I haven't put any denim in the back lift door. I'm thinking that the LINGDA might be good use there. Also I could put some on the plastic covers of the back wheel wells for added sound absorption.

When I first installed the Noico it helped a lot. But I wanted more noise reduction so I added the denim and it gave me the results I was hoping for.

When you installed the Noico and LINGDA did you do it all at once? I know that the LINGDA is listed as sound deadening material. But I'm wondering how the demin and LINGDA would compare as sound absorption material.
 

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I did it all in one long process so I can't speak to how much of a difference the insulation made compared to just the Noico. The Lingda might have a bit more noise attenuation compared to denim due to the foil layer, which should reflect a tiny bit of the sound..
 

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I haven't put any denim in the back lift door. I'm thinking that the LINGDA might be good use there. Also I could put some on the plastic covers of the back wheel wells for added sound absorption.
Putting the Lingda in the plastic trim covering on the rear lift door was fast and easy- much easier than the side doors. There is enough space in the trim to easily accommodate the insulation. There so much space it just seems to beg to have some insulation! Plus its more or less a square shape so not a lot of cutting to do.

The Lingda is a lot like a 3/8" foam sleeping pad which are used for camping. The cells are larger and its a bit softer but it certainly has a foamy, cushion feel to it. I'm sure that help with sound absorption too.

I used one 40 x 80" piece to do under the hood and the rear lift door trim with some left overs. I used the left overs to put on the back side of trim in the cargo area.

The other 40 x 80" piece covered all 4 side doors.
 

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Interesting, but likely more relevant to vans vs where it’s being placed in our RAV4s. I doubt the inner door skin gets much (if any) condensation. It’s within the door, not the outer door skin or up against the actual wall of the van. The cloth seats in my cars have never gotten moldy. I don’t think cotton on the interior side of the car door would either.
A lot depends on where you live. In the desert southwest, you'd be correct. But condensation is more of an issue in northern areas with long winters and cold temps. Or in the humid Pacific Northwest.

Your seats get plenty of opportunities to dry out since they are exposed to the air. That is not true behind a piece of plastic trim or metal. Once moisture gets trapped it takes a lot longer to dry. And maybe not until the next summer in cold climates. Water that gets under floor mats seems to take forever to dry out unless its well above freezing for quite some time. Think of a cotton towel that you use after a shower. (Or wool socks.) It soaks up water fast, but has to hang on a towel rack for hours to dry out.
 
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