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The sound deadening project

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Hi everyone, this post will be all about my adventure into sound deadening my rattle box and trying and hoping on making my Rav quiet enough to me and getting rid of all those rattles. First, let start by saying this is the first time I ever venture into installing sound deadening into a car, which means this will be a learn as you go experience. I'll be more than happy to answer any question as the project go if I can answer them.


This project will consist of improving the sound insulation into the Rav4 in a why that will hopefully reduce road noise and random door rattle. To do this, I am anticipating on doing the following areas:


  • The 4 door panels (As per the picture, you need to do the inside door, the door panel and the plastic panel.
  • The Front pillars
  • The center console (Where the shifter and armrest is)
  • The Trunk
  • The entire back of the Suv (Spare area, fenders but I am not touching the roof)
  • The hood


For this project, I'll be turning my-self to a product called Butyl made by Noico. This product is about 1/3 what Dynamat cost and is really similar. This can be bought on Amazon. Installation is as simple as laying it down and rolling it with a roller.


Few things I've learned from the door I did on Sunday. This product is easy to apply and you don't need to heat it. Just lay it off in the sun and it's maniable. The process is not hard per say but is time consuming. A single door took me 3 hours and about 5 sheets of material.


I also learned that our doors are made of 2 layers of thin metal. I'd call it an inner skin (inside the door) and outer skin (where you can see the speaker). I am not 100% if one could disassemble the outer skin to gain easier access to the inner skin, but I was personally not confortable tinkering with this. I simply decided to remove the white plastic of the outer skin to gain access to the inside and do my best to reach and apply the material. Also, I to know if a difference is made, I took a few sound reading. Going 115km/h on the highway, I hit a an average of 86db. Baseline was 48db with engine off.

Now enough bla bla and here are a few picture of the first door.

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Hi everyone, this post will be all about my adventure into sound deadening my rattle box and trying and hoping on making my Rav quiet enough to me and getting rid of all those rattles. First, let start by saying this is the first time I ever venture into installing sound deadening into a car, which means this will be a learn as you go experience. I'll be more than happy to answer any question as the project go if I can answer them.


This project will consist of improving the sound insulation into the Rav4 in a why that will hopefully reduce road noise and random door rattle. To do this, I am anticipating on doing the following areas:


  • The 4 door panels (As per the picture, you need to do the inside door, the door panel and the plastic panel.
  • The Front pillars
  • The center console (Where the shifter and armrest is)
  • The Trunk
  • The entire back of the Suv (Spare area, fenders but I am not touching the roof)
  • The hood


For this project, I'll be turning my-self to a product called Butyl made by Noico. This product is about 1/3 what Dynamat cost and is really similar. This can be bought on Amazon. Installation is as simple as laying it down and rolling it with a roller.


Few things I've learned from the door I did on Sunday. This product is easy to apply and you don't need to heat it. Just lay it off in the sun and it's maniable. The process is not hard per say but is time consuming. A single door took me 3 hours and about 5 sheets of material.


I also learned that our doors are made of 2 layers of thin metal. I'd call it an inner skin (inside the door) and outer skin (where you can see the speaker). I am not 100% if one could disassemble the outer skin to gain easier access to the inner skin, but I was personally not confortable tinkering with this. I simply decided to remove the white plastic of the outer skin to gain access to the inside and do my best to reach and apply the material. Also, I to know if a difference is made, I took a few sound reading. Going 115km/h on the highway, I hit a an average of 86db. Baseline was 48db with engine off.

Now enough bla bla and here are a few picture of the first door.
Adding the Noico heat and sound insulation to the back of the panels will also help in the overall solution.
 

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If "you" can mask off good, another method is to use the 2-part spray foams, the ones that mix part-A part-B at the nozzle and spray out like spray paint, usually a polyurethane.

Or, I have seen where you spray on layer of part-A, then spray on part-B and the two react to create a foam.

I am not sure which method is good or bad, but 2019-2022 Rav's are very noisy, so any sound control is a must.
 

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If "you" can mask off good, another method is to use the 2-part spray foams, the ones that mix part-A part-B at the nozzle and spray out like spray paint, usually a polyurethane.

Or, I have seen where you spray on layer of part-A, then spray on part-B and the two react to create a foam.

I am not sure which method is good or bad, but 2019-2022 Rav's are very noisy, so any sound control is a must.
Yikes 😬….. lol
 

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Hi,

Has any one tried to remove Toyota's wheel well liner and applied sound deadening mat to the metal surface of wheel well? The main source of road noise penetrating into the cabin is wheel well. If it can be deadened from the source it would be more effective. May be treating wheel well will be most effective with least effort. Toyota's use of sound absorption wheel well liner is fairly effective. My 2021 RAV4 hybrid stock is quieter than my 1996 Honda Accord wagon stock, the major difference is the rear wheel well liner on Toyota. The wheel well inside car are both bare metals.

I have applied sound deadening mat (Amazon basic) inside of passenger doors and trunk door. and inside rear wheel arches. I also installed a layer of 3M thinsulate insulation sm600l between door plastics cover and metal surface and inside wheel well. I can hear the road noise reduced. I measured 62-64db at near driver's face at 60mph on freshly paved asphalt road. At 70mph, noise goes up by 3db to 65-67db, another 3db increase at 80mph. On the course concrete road, the noise goes up by 8-10db. The car is still not as quiet as my expectation. All measures were done with radio shack sound meter A-weighting slow response.

The frequency of road noise is in 800 to 1200 hz. The manufacture specs of 3M thinsulate insulation sm600l sound absorption is most effective at around 1000 hz. I can not find the most effective frequence where bytel sound deadening material is. The marketer's of butyl material uses a metal bell to demonstrate the effective of the material. However, no manufacture of butyl material has published the measurement at what frequencies that butyl materials are most effective.
 

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View attachment 143713

View attachment 143714

So, I removed the rear fender-well liners and all under body panels, doing ~1.5 layers everywhere I could (partial overlaps, or a full 2nd layer in particularly thin areas). I used another full 25lbs, putting me at around 72-73lbs of total sound deadening (I have 1x 25lb box left, plus about 7/8 of one sheet).

Note: I would NOT recommend bothering doing inside the front fender wells. There were an easy 20+ fasteners holding each liner on, and it turns out the small area in there that shares a wall with the cabin is pretty sturdy (likely for off-center crash protection), so I dont expect these mats did much there. I did one side and even bother doing the other.

As far as sound goes, it was slightly noticable, but my current metric of reduced radio volumes is becoming ineffective; all this seemed to do was further isolate the annoying tire whine of these Duratrac tires. Of note, I did a quick peak under the carpet in a few places, and it seems there is a layer of padding between the carpet and floor. That, and I tink the plastic underbody panels actually do a decent job of reducing under-vehicle turbulance. That is all to say I think this additional matting was less effective than the other sections I did (doors, hood, and cargo area).

Buttom Line, if I were making a recommendation on uses of this Noice 80mil matting:

1) $67 for a single 25lb pack and maybe 30-60 minutes to do a double-layer under the spare, and a double-layer under the hood. This will dramatically reduce engine noise, and probably make a noticable difference in road noise, all with minimal fuss.

2) Buy another $67 box (~$135 total) to do the doors and rear hatch in about 3-5 hours. You'd probably have 10+lbs or so left over with all single layers, but this will probably be the best use of your first 3-5 hours tearing apart panels.

2a) If you do only a single layer under the spare (instead if a double-layer as mentioned in "1") and bought the 2nd box mentioned above, you should then have enough to do the entire floor and sides of the cargo area. This would be the third step I'd take, and would be another 2-4 hours.

3) Finally, a 3rd box (~$201 total) and another 2-4 hours will do a hefty layer under the vehicle, from the front of the cab to the fuel tank, and the rear wheel wells. It seemed to make a modest difference, but I hypothesize the plastic under-body panels and under-carpet insulation are already doing some of that work. I am glad I did it, but since there are no bulk shipping discounts I'd say do the first two steps above and assess before committing to the expense and time of matting the underbody.


If it is any indication how annoying the sound of the tires has become, I actually just ordered 5 new tires in a different brand. It was like I did all this silencing only to have somebody sit in the back seat and hold a single, steady "oooooh" all the way to work :p .

Hi Lindenwood,

Do you have pictures that you removed rear wheel well liner? How hard is it to remove rear well liner? I have applied amazon basic sound deadening mat on all 5 doors and inside car of wheel wells. It worked to certain degree. I am thinking removing liner and applying to rear wheel well metal. Rear wheel well is the major source of road noise penetrating into the cabin. It might be most effective vs cost and effort in reducing road noise.

Thanks,
swllz
 

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I've deadened all 4 wheel wells just recently. It's a PITA getting them out and back in. Especially the front ones. They are secured with some 10 clips and additionally with 5 big clips which are used to fasten the aftermarket mud guards.
Either you tweak them out, or you just cut the cap out and replace with new ones. (Luckily there are none of this suckers in the rear). And while I managed to get the rear wells out just by jacking up the car, I had to take out the front tyres out in order to get better access to some of the mentioned clips.
We spent the whole weekend together with my friend, who was helping me with this mess from time to time. It took around 2 hours per wheel well including sticking some mats on the wheel housing area itself (on the body and inner side of the fender).
The effect is unfortunately not as good as i was hoping for. Yes the road noise went down but not more than 20-30% depending on road surface. The road noise still persists, is annoying and comes mainly from the bottom as well as from C-pillars (more on this later).

Maybe I did it wrong and should have covered the wheel wells completely with Alubutyl mat. Just followed the advice I've seen in other forums and Youtube etc. and thought it would be just enough. Turned out it was not. Since the wells surface on the inside is not plain and smooth anyway, its quite difficult to cover it properly with the Soundmat, especially if its no more that warm outside and the mat no more that flexible. Additionally, it was uncertain if the well ever gets back in place if you add too much material on it. Also, once we've got the well liner out, it didn't felt that weak and creepy. It's cheap plastic, yes, but felt quite solid and robust. If you knock on it, it sounds dull. Of course, once you add some material it becomes heavier and sounds more dull, but the difference is not the same like on thin metal.

I used 3M Alubutyl mat which is similar to Killmat and alike. On top we patched 6mm Armaflex insulation mat, similar to Noico (mentioned above by Sienna1). Both were German products which are similar to those mentioned across the forum and worked quite well on the doors and on the hatch. I'll report on this sound deadening "experience" in a separate thread, which will be much longer.

I'm adding the pictures of the wheel wells, so everybody can judge if he wants to make this adventure. For myself, I'll definitely not do it again :)
If anybody is having better results, please post it. Just curios what went wrong on my side.
 

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I've deadened all 4 wheel wells just recently. It's a PITA getting them out and back in. Especially the front ones. They are secured with some 10 clips and additionally with 5 big clips which are used to fasten the aftermarket mud guards.
Either you tweak them out, or you just cut the cap out and replace with new ones. (Luckily there are none of this suckers in the rear). And while I managed to get the rear wells out just by jacking up the car, I had to take out the front tyres out in order to get better access to some of the mentioned clips.
We spent the whole weekend together with my friend, who was helping me with this mess from time to time. It took around 2 hours per wheel well including sticking some mats on the wheel housing area itself (on the body and inner side of the fender).
The effect is unfortunately not as good as i was hoping for. Yes the road noise went down but not more than 20-30% depending on road surface. The road noise still persists, is annoying and comes mainly from the bottom as well as from C-pillars (more on this later).

Maybe I did it wrong and should have covered the wheel wells completely with Alubutyl mat. Just followed the advice I've seen in other forums and Youtube etc. and thought it would be just enough. Turned out it was not. Since the wells surface on the inside is not plain and smooth anyway, its quite difficult to cover it properly with the Soundmat, especially if its no more that warm outside and the mat no more that flexible. Additionally, it was uncertain if the well ever gets back in place if you add too much material on it. Also, once we've got the well liner out, it didn't felt that weak and creepy. It's cheap plastic, yes, but felt quite solid and robust. If you knock on it, it sounds dull. Of course, once you add some material it becomes heavier and sounds more dull, but the difference is not the same like on thin metal.

I used 3M Alubutyl mat which is similar to Killmat and alike. On top we patched 6mm Armaflex insulation mat, similar to Noico (mentioned above by Sienna1). Both were German products which are similar to those mentioned across the forum and worked quite well on the doors and on the hatch. I'll report on this sound deadening "experience" in a separate thread, which will be much longer.

I'm adding the pictures of the wheel wells, so everybody can judge if he wants to make this adventure. For myself, I'll definitely not do it again :)
If anybody is having better results, please post it. Just curios what went wrong on my side.
Hi, did you break any clips in the rear well? Where do you get your replacement clips? Thanks,
 

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They are none of the tough ones in the rear. You can easily pull the "normal" clips out with a screwdriver. The tough ones are at front, they have a rectangular nose and around 4 of them are clipped to the fender, and another one in the upper front. Not sure about the sense of the upper one, but it is there... If you manage to grab them with a proper tool, adjust in a 45° angle, grab the notches and then pull them out using some soft force. If that doesnt work for you, you can always get them from Toyota or Ebay or AMZN or whatever. We managed to tweak around and pull them all out without too much damage. Even if you sacrifice some you should get a replacement easily within a few days. Good luck and cheers.
 

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The front well shields are plastics probably no acoustics property, it is also separated from cabin. It may not help at all.

A pillars may contribute good amount of noise into cabin.

My 2021 RAV4 XLE hybrid had window shield replaced replaced by my insurance. The glass used by Safelite is made by Fuyao. Fuyao glass is made in UAS by a Chinese entrepreneur. This glass has an acoustic layer. According to Fuyao manufacture website, this acoustic layer is effective at 1k to 4k frequencies by 5 to 10 db. It only helps with most human voice and horns from the other cars. It does not help much with engine and road noise anyways. Toyota 2.5 engine has highest efficiency in 1800 to 2800 rpm, where engine noise is in 60 to 93 Hz. In hybrid cars, Toyota would definitely program engine rpm in this range to get the high mpg. Road noise frequency mainly is in 1000 Hz. I did not measure a front windshield noise before the glass replacement, so I have no base to compare if this acoustic glass has an effect.

Font Material property Circle Pattern Mesh
 

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Just curious for those who did this where was the best results found in? Covering the whole floor or what? And was it worth it after all said and done.
According to second skin web site, 25% coverage will be effective, 60% will be 95% effective. I did about 60% for all 5 doors. I did 100% for inside rear wells. I also add a layer of 3M - SM600L blanket for all doors between plastic trim and metal surface. Automotive tire Hood Vehicle Tire Automotive design
Vehicle Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive lighting
 

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almost any material works some..
that spray on bed liner material works ok if you can get the metal clean.

just think of this like a 55 gallon kettle instrument.
even dots or squares of material will help.

if you can stand the weight, spray foam like pond foam from menards works ok for pockets.
or just linex the whole car or truck.
but it has to be clean for that to stick well.

maybe soda blast it?
 

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almost any material works some..
that spray on bed liner material works ok if you can get the metal clean.

just think of this like a 55 gallon kettle instrument.
even dots or squares of material will help.

if you can stand the weight, spray foam like pond foam from menards works ok for pockets.
or just linex the whole car or truck.
but it has to be clean for that to stick well.

maybe soda blast it?
Make sure the material will not melt in the summer when car parked under the sun, or will not crack, bristle after a few years.

I have used "peel & seal" from home store, it melts during summer and becomes sticky mess.
 
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