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I would like to continue the story i started in response to SwIIz's question and tell more on other "experiences" with sound deadening I had.

Actually, I've spent a lot of time reading this forum and I would like to pass my special thanks to @Sunken, @Lindenwood, @Torque as well as many others who shared their story.

I've got a 2022 4WD Hybrid Black Edition, which might be comparable to the Limited trim in the US. Not sure if any Black Edition has been offered in the US or CAN but I guess it might be a match based on the extras loaded.
Received the car back in May, took it on a long trip the next day, and been swearing the whole journey.

It turned to be by far the loudest car I had in the last 20 years, especially as soon as you exceed 65mph. Once returned back, I started to dig deeper and finally ended up here. (of course i made a test drive before and been reading reviews, searched the forums etc.prior to sign the contract, but thats a different story). Unfortunately I missed this forum prior to signing the contract. And my second mistake was not taking the car to the highway during test drive.
Anyway, after going through a bunch of stories here, I've decided to do some sound deadening as well and hopefully to bring the noise to more tolerable level.

Following the advises here, I found the proper materials, and started with the cargo area. I did the trunk, the doors, the hatch, the hood, the doorcards and the wheel liners.

But to be honest gentlemen, while it all makes it better, it doesn't makes it good!! 🤬

Several hundred bucks and around 2 weeks of labor work later, I can confirm the following (% = personal feeling, in brackets = measured):

1. Deadening trunk -> -10- 20% noise from the back (-1 -2 dB)

2. Deadening doors -> -30-40% noise from the side and the bottom (-3 -4 dB). The doors feel and close much more solid, confirmed.

3. Deadening hatch -> -5-10% noise from the back (-1 dB)

4. Adding weatherstrips on the lower frame of the doors --> -5-10% road noise (-0.5 dB or something) --> that was advice by @Torque, confirmed

5. Adding weatherstrips on the top frame of the doors (from A- to C- pillar like shown in some videos) --> Useless

6. Adding weatherstrips between the doors and front-rear fenders --> Front contributes to little less wind noise, but hardly measurable in dB.

7. Replacing the side windows by double layer glass taken from Prime --> -20-30% wind noise from the A-pillar --> best choice along with Nr. 1 and 2.

8. Deadening wheel wells --> -20-30% road noise (-1 -2 dB) depending on road surface

9. Deadening the hood (add some mats behind OEM) --> 5-10% less engine noise (not really measurable but noticeable) --> spare your time if you have OEM mat installed already.

10. Killing the pedestrian sound --> priceless.

All in all the level of noise went down from 72-74 dB @130km/h / 85mph to 64-67 dB depending on tarmac you drive on. The loudest it is on bridges, where they often use concrete layer.

I've used my Pixel phone which is of course not calibrated, but initial 72-74dB matched quite well with the data from public test drives and reviews. And the difference is confirmed as well.

If you count all the percentage numbers, you may think that the car is already gone quite by 150%. Since sound measures in dB which is logarithmic, it is not that simple (will not add on details here).

A good portion of noise still remains and is quite annoying.

What drives me crazy is the road noise remaining, the engine noise when you hit the pedal, as well as the wind which comes up when you hit 60mph and more. I did a lot of observation, research, due diligence, reading forums, watching videos, adding a strip here, a mat there etc., trying to find out where this f.. noise comes from.

The conclusion i have is that the road noise mainly comes from the bottom of the car by reflection from the road surface as well as from the C-pillars (after deadening the trunk and doors of course). Not sure how it finds it's way to the C-pillars but it does somehow. After deadening the wheel liners the noise on C-pillars has been reduced, but it's not gone completely.

The poor insulation of the firewall greatly contributes to the coarse noise of the ICE once it's hit properly. The poor sound proofing of the base contributes to the ICE noise coming from the bottom as well.

The poor design of the A-pillars, the mirrors and most likely the roof rails greatly contribute to the annoying wind noise. While the wind itself is not that loud, the whoowing and turbulent sound, especially at crosswinds can drive you crazy. My biggest suspect are the poorly made roof rails, which are even not properly fixed, but clipped on the roof. You can move them back and forward at teh ends. On my impression, since the rails are not properly sealed, and not really aerodynamic, the wind blows across and creates these turbulence's. Adding the holes for the clips, which go just trough into the cabin, this might be the reason for.

To stay with the wind: I've got my side windows replaced by Lamisafe ones taken from Prime. Unfortunately, there are no such windows available for the rear. This area remains one of the weakest points, and i could not find any solution till now. I was thinking to adjust the rubber seals or bring them somehow closer to the glass. But even if you press the glass by hand while seating in the back, it doesn't make it any better. There must be some cavity or something which lets the noise in. And, if you seat in the back, you can hear some additional noise coming from the C-Pillars, especially when the cars are passing by or you overpass a noisy truck. Feels like the window would be open a bit or there is a hole somewhere. There are indeed 2 holes in the C-pillar holding the clips from the fancy useless cover, which attributes to some design specialties and makes the roof appear "disconnected from the rear body" when you look at it from the side. This is especially noticeable when you have a 2 color trim. This fancy cover is held by 2 clips and a bunch of double sided tape. The same applies to the cover on the A-pillar. I really wonder why they didn't tape the whole car together. That would be smart, innovative and cheap indeed. For those who do not believe, you can easily unclip the cover and convince yourself.

Last but not least: once you enter a tunnel, which we have plenty of back here, you just hear a loud ground noise coming from everywhere. 🤬

To make the long story short, I'm highly disappointed with this crap. It could have been such a nice car, if Toyota would spend at least a few bucks to mitigate the noise. It looks like Gen 5 has been designed by a pro, but built by the interns. On top they've engaged a project manager and/ or product manager who apparently did not even test drive their baby. Maybe it would be tolerable if it would be cheap. It is build cheap, i agree. But it comes with a premium price tag here in Europe. they claim about 50k for Hybrid and 60k for Prime here.

I'll not comment on ridiculousness's like poor cabin illumination, non- illuminated switches, missing seat pockets (mine only has it on passengers side), outdated navi, vibrating mirrors and hoods, the dashboard displaying "No messages", the beeping and wheening, the goofy powertrain etc.

I like the exterior of the car, and I do not doubt the overall reliability of the car at all. We had 2 Toyotas back in the 90s and they've been good and reliable cars. But after all, i wonder how RAV4 could become a bestseller. Either I'm spoiled or are other people less demanding or tolerable?

To all those who are thinking of buying a RAV4, here is my personal and professional advice: you better revise your opinion and run away. If you love Toyota sooo much, you better go for a Prime or consider the CH-R (new 2022 model). Those are by far better cars in terms of noise and driving fun. In the meantime, Toyota should better take lessons from Stellantis on how to build proper cars. (and how to make roof rails). Apparently they've lost their skills recently.
 

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173 Posts
I would like to continue the story i started in response to SwIIz's question and tell more on other "experiences" with sound deadening I had.

Actually, I've spent a lot of time reading this forum and I would like to pass my special thanks to @Sunken, @Lindenwood, @Torque as well as many others who shared their story.

I've got a 2022 4WD Hybrid Black Edition, which might be comparable to the Limited trim in the US. Not sure if any Black Edition has been offered in the US or CAN but I guess it might be a match based on the extras loaded.
Received the car back in May, took it on a long trip the next day, and been swearing the whole journey.

It turned to be by far the loudest car I had in the last 20 years, especially as soon as you exceed 65mph. Once returned back, I started to dig deeper and finally ended up here. (of course i made a test drive before and been reading reviews, searched the forums etc.prior to sign the contract, but thats a different story). Unfortunately I missed this forum prior to signing the contract. And my second mistake was not taking the car to the highway during test drive.
Anyway, after going through a bunch of stories here, I've decided to do some sound deadening as well and hopefully to bring the noise to more tolerable level.

Following the advises here, I found the proper materials, and started with the cargo area. I did the trunk, the doors, the hatch, the hood, the doorcards and the wheel liners.

But to be honest gentlemen, while it all makes it better, it doesn't makes it good!! 🤬

Several hundred bucks and around 2 weeks of labor work later, I can confirm the following (% = personal feeling, in brackets = measured):

1. Deadening trunk -> -10- 20% noise from the back (-1 -2 dB)

2. Deadening doors -> -30-40% noise from the side and the bottom (-3 -4 dB). The doors feel and close much more solid, confirmed.

3. Deadening hatch -> -5-10% noise from the back (-1 dB)

4. Adding weatherstrips on the lower frame of the doors --> -5-10% road noise (-0.5 dB or something) --> that was advice by @Torque, confirmed

5. Adding weatherstrips on the top frame of the doors (from A- to C- pillar like shown in some videos) --> Useless

6. Adding weatherstrips between the doors and front-rear fenders --> Front contributes to little less wind noise, but hardly measurable in dB.

7. Replacing the side windows by double layer glass taken from Prime --> -20-30% wind noise from the A-pillar --> best choice along with Nr. 1 and 2.

8. Deadening wheel wells --> -20-30% road noise (-1 -2 dB) depending on road surface

9. Deadening the hood (add some mats behind OEM) --> 5-10% less engine noise (not really measurable but noticeable) --> spare your time if you have OEM mat installed already.

10. Killing the pedestrian sound --> priceless.

All in all the level of noise went down from 72-74 dB @130km/h / 85mph to 64-67 dB depending on tarmac you drive on. The loudest it is on bridges, where they often use concrete layer.

I've used my Pixel phone which is of course not calibrated, but initial 72-74dB matched quite well with the data from public test drives and reviews. And the difference is confirmed as well.

If you count all the percentage numbers, you may think that the car is already gone quite by 150%. Since sound measures in dB which is logarithmic, it is not that simple (will not add on details here).

A good portion of noise still remains and is quite annoying.

What drives me crazy is the road noise remaining, the engine noise when you hit the pedal, as well as the wind which comes up when you hit 60mph and more. I did a lot of observation, research, due diligence, reading forums, watching videos, adding a strip here, a mat there etc., trying to find out where this f.. noise comes from.

The conclusion i have is that the road noise mainly comes from the bottom of the car by reflection from the road surface as well as from the C-pillars (after deadening the trunk and doors of course). Not sure how it finds it's way to the C-pillars but it does somehow. After deadening the wheel liners the noise on C-pillars has been reduced, but it's not gone completely.

The poor insulation of the firewall greatly contributes to the coarse noise of the ICE once it's hit properly. The poor sound proofing of the base contributes to the ICE noise coming from the bottom as well.

The poor design of the A-pillars, the mirrors and most likely the roof rails greatly contribute to the annoying wind noise. While the wind itself is not that loud, the whoowing and turbulent sound, especially at crosswinds can drive you crazy. My biggest suspect are the poorly made roof rails, which are even not properly fixed, but clipped on the roof. You can move them back and forward at teh ends. On my impression, since the rails are not properly sealed, and not really aerodynamic, the wind blows across and creates these turbulence's. Adding the holes for the clips, which go just trough into the cabin, this might be the reason for.

To stay with the wind: I've got my side windows replaced by Lamisafe ones taken from Prime. Unfortunately, there are no such windows available for the rear. This area remains one of the weakest points, and i could not find any solution till now. I was thinking to adjust the rubber seals or bring them somehow closer to the glass. But even if you press the glass by hand while seating in the back, it doesn't make it any better. There must be some cavity or something which lets the noise in. And, if you seat in the back, you can hear some additional noise coming from the C-Pillars, especially when the cars are passing by or you overpass a noisy truck. Feels like the window would be open a bit or there is a hole somewhere. There are indeed 2 holes in the C-pillar holding the clips from the fancy useless cover, which attributes to some design specialties and makes the roof appear "disconnected from the rear body" when you look at it from the side. This is especially noticeable when you have a 2 color trim. This fancy cover is held by 2 clips and a bunch of double sided tape. The same applies to the cover on the A-pillar. I really wonder why they didn't tape the whole car together. That would be smart, innovative and cheap indeed. For those who do not believe, you can easily unclip the cover and convince yourself.

Last but not least: once you enter a tunnel, which we have plenty of back here, you just hear a loud ground noise coming from everywhere. 🤬

To make the long story short, I'm highly disappointed with this crap. It could have been such a nice car, if Toyota would spend at least a few bucks to mitigate the noise. It looks like Gen 5 has been designed by a pro, but built by the interns. On top they've engaged a project manager and/ or product manager who apparently did not even test drive their baby. Maybe it would be tolerable if it would be cheap. It is build cheap, i agree. But it comes with a premium price tag here in Europe. they claim about 50k for Hybrid and 60k for Prime here.

I'll not comment on ridiculousness's like poor cabin illumination, non- illuminated switches, missing seat pockets (mine only has it on passengers side), outdated navi, vibrating mirrors and hoods, the dashboard displaying "No messages", the beeping and wheening, the goofy powertrain etc.

I like the exterior of the car, and I do not doubt the overall reliability of the car at all. We had 2 Toyotas back in the 90s and they've been good and reliable cars. But after all, i wonder how RAV4 could become a bestseller. Either I'm spoiled or are other people less demanding or tolerable?

To all those who are thinking of buying a RAV4, here is my personal and professional advice: you better revise your opinion and run away. If you love Toyota sooo much, you better go for a Prime or consider the CH-R (new 2022 model). Those are by far better cars in terms of noise and driving fun. In the meantime, Toyota should better take lessons from Stellantis on how to build proper cars. (and how to make roof rails). Apparently they've lost their skills recently.
I have many of the same opinions as you. This is my first Toyota vehicle and I went with Toyota cause the more I learned about their hybrid system the more I was convinced they had the best and most experience in the industry. However this car has been a constant disappointment on NVH, poor interior lights, a gas tank I have to sliw fill, a lack of basic features (no tire pressure screen, no compass, worst speakers, crappy key fob distance, the key fob auto start subscription after 10 years is mind numbing and poor execution of strange anoying warning beeps). I did the sound deadening and speaker swap on the front doors... next spring I'll do the rear doors.
 

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I would like to continue the story i started in response to SwIIz's question and tell more on other "experiences" with sound deadening I had.

Actually, I've spent a lot of time reading this forum and I would like to pass my special thanks to @Sunken, @Lindenwood, @Torque as well as many others who shared their story.

I've got a 2022 4WD Hybrid Black Edition, which might be comparable to the Limited trim in the US. Not sure if any Black Edition has been offered in the US or CAN but I guess it might be a match based on the extras loaded.
Received the car back in May, took it on a long trip the next day, and been swearing the whole journey.

It turned to be by far the loudest car I had in the last 20 years, especially as soon as you exceed 65mph. Once returned back, I started to dig deeper and finally ended up here. (of course i made a test drive before and been reading reviews, searched the forums etc.prior to sign the contract, but thats a different story). Unfortunately I missed this forum prior to signing the contract. And my second mistake was not taking the car to the highway during test drive.
Anyway, after going through a bunch of stories here, I've decided to do some sound deadening as well and hopefully to bring the noise to more tolerable level.

Following the advises here, I found the proper materials, and started with the cargo area. I did the trunk, the doors, the hatch, the hood, the doorcards and the wheel liners.

But to be honest gentlemen, while it all makes it better, it doesn't makes it good!! 🤬

Several hundred bucks and around 2 weeks of labor work later, I can confirm the following (% = personal feeling, in brackets = measured):

1. Deadening trunk -> -10- 20% noise from the back (-1 -2 dB)

2. Deadening doors -> -30-40% noise from the side and the bottom (-3 -4 dB). The doors feel and close much more solid, confirmed.

3. Deadening hatch -> -5-10% noise from the back (-1 dB)

4. Adding weatherstrips on the lower frame of the doors --> -5-10% road noise (-0.5 dB or something) --> that was advice by @Torque, confirmed

5. Adding weatherstrips on the top frame of the doors (from A- to C- pillar like shown in some videos) --> Useless

6. Adding weatherstrips between the doors and front-rear fenders --> Front contributes to little less wind noise, but hardly measurable in dB.

7. Replacing the side windows by double layer glass taken from Prime --> -20-30% wind noise from the A-pillar --> best choice along with Nr. 1 and 2.

8. Deadening wheel wells --> -20-30% road noise (-1 -2 dB) depending on road surface

9. Deadening the hood (add some mats behind OEM) --> 5-10% less engine noise (not really measurable but noticeable) --> spare your time if you have OEM mat installed already.

10. Killing the pedestrian sound --> priceless.

All in all the level of noise went down from 72-74 dB @130km/h / 85mph to 64-67 dB depending on tarmac you drive on. The loudest it is on bridges, where they often use concrete layer.

I've used my Pixel phone which is of course not calibrated, but initial 72-74dB matched quite well with the data from public test drives and reviews. And the difference is confirmed as well.

If you count all the percentage numbers, you may think that the car is already gone quite by 150%. Since sound measures in dB which is logarithmic, it is not that simple (will not add on details here).

A good portion of noise still remains and is quite annoying.

What drives me crazy is the road noise remaining, the engine noise when you hit the pedal, as well as the wind which comes up when you hit 60mph and more. I did a lot of observation, research, due diligence, reading forums, watching videos, adding a strip here, a mat there etc., trying to find out where this f.. noise comes from.

The conclusion i have is that the road noise mainly comes from the bottom of the car by reflection from the road surface as well as from the C-pillars (after deadening the trunk and doors of course). Not sure how it finds it's way to the C-pillars but it does somehow. After deadening the wheel liners the noise on C-pillars has been reduced, but it's not gone completely.

The poor insulation of the firewall greatly contributes to the coarse noise of the ICE once it's hit properly. The poor sound proofing of the base contributes to the ICE noise coming from the bottom as well.

The poor design of the A-pillars, the mirrors and most likely the roof rails greatly contribute to the annoying wind noise. While the wind itself is not that loud, the whoowing and turbulent sound, especially at crosswinds can drive you crazy. My biggest suspect are the poorly made roof rails, which are even not properly fixed, but clipped on the roof. You can move them back and forward at teh ends. On my impression, since the rails are not properly sealed, and not really aerodynamic, the wind blows across and creates these turbulence's. Adding the holes for the clips, which go just trough into the cabin, this might be the reason for.

To stay with the wind: I've got my side windows replaced by Lamisafe ones taken from Prime. Unfortunately, there are no such windows available for the rear. This area remains one of the weakest points, and i could not find any solution till now. I was thinking to adjust the rubber seals or bring them somehow closer to the glass. But even if you press the glass by hand while seating in the back, it doesn't make it any better. There must be some cavity or something which lets the noise in. And, if you seat in the back, you can hear some additional noise coming from the C-Pillars, especially when the cars are passing by or you overpass a noisy truck. Feels like the window would be open a bit or there is a hole somewhere. There are indeed 2 holes in the C-pillar holding the clips from the fancy useless cover, which attributes to some design specialties and makes the roof appear "disconnected from the rear body" when you look at it from the side. This is especially noticeable when you have a 2 color trim. This fancy cover is held by 2 clips and a bunch of double sided tape. The same applies to the cover on the A-pillar. I really wonder why they didn't tape the whole car together. That would be smart, innovative and cheap indeed. For those who do not believe, you can easily unclip the cover and convince yourself.

Last but not least: once you enter a tunnel, which we have plenty of back here, you just hear a loud ground noise coming from everywhere. 🤬

To make the long story short, I'm highly disappointed with this crap. It could have been such a nice car, if Toyota would spend at least a few bucks to mitigate the noise. It looks like Gen 5 has been designed by a pro, but built by the interns. On top they've engaged a project manager and/ or product manager who apparently did not even test drive their baby. Maybe it would be tolerable if it would be cheap. It is build cheap, i agree. But it comes with a premium price tag here in Europe. they claim about 50k for Hybrid and 60k for Prime here.

I'll not comment on ridiculousness's like poor cabin illumination, non- illuminated switches, missing seat pockets (mine only has it on passengers side), outdated navi, vibrating mirrors and hoods, the dashboard displaying "No messages", the beeping and wheening, the goofy powertrain etc.

I like the exterior of the car, and I do not doubt the overall reliability of the car at all. We had 2 Toyotas back in the 90s and they've been good and reliable cars. But after all, i wonder how RAV4 could become a bestseller. Either I'm spoiled or are other people less demanding or tolerable?

To all those who are thinking of buying a RAV4, here is my personal and professional advice: you better revise your opinion and run away. If you love Toyota sooo much, you better go for a Prime or consider the CH-R (new 2022 model). Those are by far better cars in terms of noise and driving fun. In the meantime, Toyota should better take lessons from Stellantis on how to build proper cars. (and how to make roof rails). Apparently they've lost their skills recently.
Good write up. You definitely did a lot of work and it will be helpful to me should I decide to go that route.
The best way to combat noise for me was to make it louder not that it really bothered me. But I replaced all speakers with alpine and installed a 12 in subwoofer. I have a 4 channel amplifier driving speakers and a 2 channel amplifier bridged for the subwoofer. Road noise is replaced with good music. I went from a new landrover Rover to a RAV4. So I knew what I was getting into. A car payment that would not break the bank and a step in economy. I also drive a crotch rocket motorcycle so I'm more flexible with what I know to be loud. The rav4 is like any other cheap car it's loud and doesn't move like a fast and torque loaded luxery car. My land Rover had a foam insulation carpet on the entire floor that probably blocked a lot of noise.
 

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I would like to continue the story i started in response to SwIIz's question and tell more on other "experiences" with sound deadening I had.

Actually, I've spent a lot of time reading this forum and I would like to pass my special thanks to @Sunken, @Lindenwood, @Torque as well as many others who shared their story.

I've got a 2022 4WD Hybrid Black Edition, which might be comparable to the Limited trim in the US. Not sure if any Black Edition has been offered in the US or CAN but I guess it might be a match based on the extras loaded.
Received the car back in May, took it on a long trip the next day, and been swearing the whole journey.

It turned to be by far the loudest car I had in the last 20 years, especially as soon as you exceed 65mph. Once returned back, I started to dig deeper and finally ended up here. (of course i made a test drive before and been reading reviews, searched the forums etc.prior to sign the contract, but thats a different story). Unfortunately I missed this forum prior to signing the contract. And my second mistake was not taking the car to the highway during test drive.
Anyway, after going through a bunch of stories here, I've decided to do some sound deadening as well and hopefully to bring the noise to more tolerable level.

Following the advises here, I found the proper materials, and started with the cargo area. I did the trunk, the doors, the hatch, the hood, the doorcards and the wheel liners.

But to be honest gentlemen, while it all makes it better, it doesn't makes it good!! 🤬

Several hundred bucks and around 2 weeks of labor work later, I can confirm the following (% = personal feeling, in brackets = measured):

1. Deadening trunk -> -10- 20% noise from the back (-1 -2 dB)

2. Deadening doors -> -30-40% noise from the side and the bottom (-3 -4 dB). The doors feel and close much more solid, confirmed.

3. Deadening hatch -> -5-10% noise from the back (-1 dB)

4. Adding weatherstrips on the lower frame of the doors --> -5-10% road noise (-0.5 dB or something) --> that was advice by @Torque, confirmed

5. Adding weatherstrips on the top frame of the doors (from A- to C- pillar like shown in some videos) --> Useless

6. Adding weatherstrips between the doors and front-rear fenders --> Front contributes to little less wind noise, but hardly measurable in dB.

7. Replacing the side windows by double layer glass taken from Prime --> -20-30% wind noise from the A-pillar --> best choice along with Nr. 1 and 2.

8. Deadening wheel wells --> -20-30% road noise (-1 -2 dB) depending on road surface

9. Deadening the hood (add some mats behind OEM) --> 5-10% less engine noise (not really measurable but noticeable) --> spare your time if you have OEM mat installed already.

10. Killing the pedestrian sound --> priceless.

All in all the level of noise went down from 72-74 dB @130km/h / 85mph to 64-67 dB depending on tarmac you drive on. The loudest it is on bridges, where they often use concrete layer.

I've used my Pixel phone which is of course not calibrated, but initial 72-74dB matched quite well with the data from public test drives and reviews. And the difference is confirmed as well.

If you count all the percentage numbers, you may think that the car is already gone quite by 150%. Since sound measures in dB which is logarithmic, it is not that simple (will not add on details here).

A good portion of noise still remains and is quite annoying.

What drives me crazy is the road noise remaining, the engine noise when you hit the pedal, as well as the wind which comes up when you hit 60mph and more. I did a lot of observation, research, due diligence, reading forums, watching videos, adding a strip here, a mat there etc., trying to find out where this f.. noise comes from.

The conclusion i have is that the road noise mainly comes from the bottom of the car by reflection from the road surface as well as from the C-pillars (after deadening the trunk and doors of course). Not sure how it finds it's way to the C-pillars but it does somehow. After deadening the wheel liners the noise on C-pillars has been reduced, but it's not gone completely.

The poor insulation of the firewall greatly contributes to the coarse noise of the ICE once it's hit properly. The poor sound proofing of the base contributes to the ICE noise coming from the bottom as well.

The poor design of the A-pillars, the mirrors and most likely the roof rails greatly contribute to the annoying wind noise. While the wind itself is not that loud, the whoowing and turbulent sound, especially at crosswinds can drive you crazy. My biggest suspect are the poorly made roof rails, which are even not properly fixed, but clipped on the roof. You can move them back and forward at teh ends. On my impression, since the rails are not properly sealed, and not really aerodynamic, the wind blows across and creates these turbulence's. Adding the holes for the clips, which go just trough into the cabin, this might be the reason for.

To stay with the wind: I've got my side windows replaced by Lamisafe ones taken from Prime. Unfortunately, there are no such windows available for the rear. This area remains one of the weakest points, and i could not find any solution till now. I was thinking to adjust the rubber seals or bring them somehow closer to the glass. But even if you press the glass by hand while seating in the back, it doesn't make it any better. There must be some cavity or something which lets the noise in. And, if you seat in the back, you can hear some additional noise coming from the C-Pillars, especially when the cars are passing by or you overpass a noisy truck. Feels like the window would be open a bit or there is a hole somewhere. There are indeed 2 holes in the C-pillar holding the clips from the fancy useless cover, which attributes to some design specialties and makes the roof appear "disconnected from the rear body" when you look at it from the side. This is especially noticeable when you have a 2 color trim. This fancy cover is held by 2 clips and a bunch of double sided tape. The same applies to the cover on the A-pillar. I really wonder why they didn't tape the whole car together. That would be smart, innovative and cheap indeed. For those who do not believe, you can easily unclip the cover and convince yourself.

Last but not least: once you enter a tunnel, which we have plenty of back here, you just hear a loud ground noise coming from everywhere. 🤬

To make the long story short, I'm highly disappointed with this crap. It could have been such a nice car, if Toyota would spend at least a few bucks to mitigate the noise. It looks like Gen 5 has been designed by a pro, but built by the interns. On top they've engaged a project manager and/ or product manager who apparently did not even test drive their baby. Maybe it would be tolerable if it would be cheap. It is build cheap, i agree. But it comes with a premium price tag here in Europe. they claim about 50k for Hybrid and 60k for Prime here.

I'll not comment on ridiculousness's like poor cabin illumination, non- illuminated switches, missing seat pockets (mine only has it on passengers side), outdated navi, vibrating mirrors and hoods, the dashboard displaying "No messages", the beeping and wheening, the goofy powertrain etc.

I like the exterior of the car, and I do not doubt the overall reliability of the car at all. We had 2 Toyotas back in the 90s and they've been good and reliable cars. But after all, i wonder how RAV4 could become a bestseller. Either I'm spoiled or are other people less demanding or tolerable?

To all those who are thinking of buying a RAV4, here is my personal and professional advice: you better revise your opinion and run away. If you love Toyota sooo much, you better go for a Prime or consider the CH-R (new 2022 model). Those are by far better cars in terms of noise and driving fun. In the meantime, Toyota should better take lessons from Stellantis on how to build proper cars. (and how to make roof rails). Apparently they've lost their skills recently.
Great write up. I have already done everything you have except for the double layer prime windows. The original prime windows were single layer for the 2021 prime. I have found many dealers online who will sell the single layer windows but can not find any who have the 2022 prime double layer for sale. Do you have the part numbers for the double layer windows? How was the installation? Did you have any problems with the thicker windows? Do you have any pictures of the installation? The lowest price I can find is $170 each for the single layer windows but can not any pricing on the double layer windows. How much in USD did you pay for the windows? Thanks for your consideration.
 

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Great write up. I have already done everything you have except for the double layer prime windows. The original prime windows were single layer for the 2021 prime. I have found many dealers online who will sell the single layer windows but can not find any who have the 2022 prime double layer for sale. Do you have the part numbers for the double layer windows? How was the installation? Did you have any problems with the thicker windows? Do you have any pictures of the installation? The lowest price I can find is $170 each for the single layer windows but can not any pricing on the double layer windows. How much in USD did you pay for the windows? Thanks for your consideration.
Are you sure? I just checked my driver window and it says Lamisafe on it, just like the windshield. 2021 Prime XSE w/ PP.
 

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I watched a video on youtube "Mercedes S-CLASS (2023) Production Line", the frames cavities between roof and sides are filled with acoustic foams to deadening frames in S class and Maybach, they cost upwards of 120k to 200k Euros. On the doors, only one piece of sound deadening of mat of about 4 x 12 inch was applied, covering no more than 25% on the door metal sheet. On this board, everyone is covering more than 50% on the door metal sheet.

S class and Maybach should be quieter or equally quiet as Lexus. I do not have experiences with opening up any Lexus to compare any sound deadening used with RAV4. However, I have experience with two Camry's of 2010 and 2015. Both Camry and RAV4 have sound absorbing materials in the rear wheel wells. On Camry door sheet metal there is a piece of sound deadening mat of 3 x 3 inch on each door. Neither Camry nor RAV4 were filled with acoustic foams in the cavities between roof and sides at all. No fill in A, B, C pillars either. So in terms of sound deadening, Camry does not have more deadening materials except small pieces in the door skin. However, Camry is regarded as quieter than RAV4, especially above 65mph. Camry has smaller roof and separated truck area to benefit from wind and road noise. All SUV's have big roof lines that are easily vibrate at speed above 65mph. RAV4 probaly uses thinner metal than previous model or other SUV's that vibrates more. I can even see that RAV4 hood flex at highway speed.

To make Camry or RAV4 quieter than they are now, Toyota needs to fill cavities with acoustic foams after the car body is painted. For our RAV4 owners, we have to remove all interior roof liner and side liner and fill all cavities with acoustic foams. More sound deadening mat needs to be applied on the firewall also. Lexus NX 350h HYBRID has exactly same power train and similar roof line costing 49K us dollar to start. If we can find out how Toyota makes Lexus quieter than Toyota's, we can try to do similar things.
 

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I watched a video on youtube "Mercedes S-CLASS (2023) Production Line", the frames cavities between roof and sides are filled with acoustic foams to deadening frames in S class and Maybach, they cost upwards of 120k to 200k Euros. On the doors, only one piece of sound deadening of mat of about 4 x 12 inch was applied, covering no more than 25% on the door metal sheet. On this board, everyone is covering more than 50% on the door metal sheet.

To make Camry or RAV4 quieter than they are now, Toyota needs to fill cavities with acoustic foams after the car body is painted. For our RAV4 owners, we have to remove all interior roof liner and side liner and fill all cavities with acoustic foams. More sound deadening mat needs to be applied on the firewall also. Lexus NX 350h HYBRID has exactly same power train and similar roof line costing 49K us dollar to start. If we can find out how Toyota makes Lexus quieter than Toyota's, we can try to do similar things.
I previously watched this video on Mercedes sound control. Would love to see the one you watched. I am going to use some open cell foam in front of the rear pressure vent, similar to what they did in the video.

I bought some Rockwool to stuff into the A-pillar cavity. Just need to remove the headliner and A-pillar covers. Not sure when I will get to that.

I sprayed the wheel wells last week with Second Skin Spectrum. I don't ever want to deal with the front liners again. The rear ones were easy to get in and out. Next I need to put MLV over the rear wheel wells and around the sub box where the spare tire used to reside. I will probably also spray Spectrum on the plastic covers that go over both rear wheel wells.

Most of the noise I hear now is wind noise. I wish I did not have the pano roof.

Curb weight is listed as 4300 lbs on the Prime. Mine weighed 4665 when I went to have it corner balanced earlier this week. I wish I would have weighed it before I started to know the real curb weight.

I have also started using Tessa tape on all of the clips to prevent them from being loose. So far I have done this on all four doors as well as the plastic trim around the cargo door.
 

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Great write up. I have already done everything you have except for the double layer prime windows. The original prime windows were single layer for the 2021 prime. I have found many dealers online who will sell the single layer windows but can not find any who have the 2022 prime double layer for sale. Do you have the part numbers for the double layer windows? How was the installation? Did you have any problems with the thicker windows? Do you have any pictures of the installation? The lowest price I can find is $170 each for the single layer windows but can not any pricing on the double layer windows. How much in USD did you pay for the windows? Thanks for your consideration.
Sorry for the late response.
the installation of the prime windows as well as tire replacement was done by the dealer, for free.
I had a long and serious conversation with them back in May and the dealer agreed to help me out a bit of this mess. He's got the glass ordered but we had to wait a few weeks for the side windows to arrive, since they came directly from Japan. There were no such spare parts available in Europe apparently. Toyota claims that one needs to replace the holding brackets as well, but as the dealer told me, they were the same. The installation is not difficult, according to the dealer it takes 1-1.5 hours for both sides. You can keep the genuine window guides and weatherstrips etc. There are no problems at all. The only difference is less noise, and that the windows close and feel more solid. They stick better within the guides and do not move back and forward like rear ones.

The difference between laminated (Lamisafe) and single layer (Temperlite) ones is the following: Double layered glass comes with a layer of foil in between. They are thicker (5mm) compared to 3.5mm genuine ones. And while the single layer has a full rounded edge, the Lamisafe ones have a double rounded edge, with a small gap in the middle (see attached pictures). As far as I've seen, all regular Hybrids come with the single layer glass. Only the Prime ones (Plug-In in Europe) come with the double layer glass at front doors.

Before the dealer helped me out here, I found the spare part numbers to be: 68101-42390 and 68102-42400. Here are the links:

Latter one sells them for 240 USD, while Toyota claims 372 USD for them. Not sure if there will be any aftermarket / 3rd party product available, since side windows do not brake that frequently.
I could not find any supplier here in Europe, therefore I'm very happy that the dealer helped me out here.

I only hope to find some solution for the rear windows as well, since this is now the area of my concern.

Good luck and nice weekend.
 

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I watched a video on youtube "Mercedes S-CLASS (2023) Production Line", the frames cavities between roof and sides are filled with acoustic foams to deadening frames in S class and Maybach, they cost upwards of 120k to 200k Euros. On the doors, only one piece of sound deadening of mat of about 4 x 12 inch was applied, covering no more than 25% on the door metal sheet. On this board, everyone is covering more than 50% on the door metal sheet.

S class and Maybach should be quieter or equally quiet as Lexus. I do not have experiences with opening up any Lexus to compare any sound deadening used with RAV4. However, I have experience with two Camry's of 2010 and 2015. Both Camry and RAV4 have sound absorbing materials in the rear wheel wells. On Camry door sheet metal there is a piece of sound deadening mat of 3 x 3 inch on each door. Neither Camry nor RAV4 were filled with acoustic foams in the cavities between roof and sides at all. No fill in A, B, C pillars either. So in terms of sound deadening, Camry does not have more deadening materials except small pieces in the door skin. However, Camry is regarded as quieter than RAV4, especially above 65mph. Camry has smaller roof and separated truck area to benefit from wind and road noise. All SUV's have big roof lines that are easily vibrate at speed above 65mph. RAV4 probaly uses thinner metal than previous model or other SUV's that vibrates more. I can even see that RAV4 hood flex at highway speed.

To make Camry or RAV4 quieter than they are now, Toyota needs to fill cavities with acoustic foams after the car body is painted. For our RAV4 owners, we have to remove all interior roof liner and side liner and fill all cavities with acoustic foams. More sound deadening mat needs to be applied on the firewall also. Lexus NX 350h HYBRID has exactly same power train and similar roof line costing 49K us dollar to start. If we can find out how Toyota makes Lexus quieter than Toyota's, we can try to do similar things.
Your idea with replicating Lexus is great but I'm afraid it's hardly possible.
My friend, who helped me a lot to mitigate the noise on my RAV4 owns a 2018 Lexus RX. This is his second Lexus after owning the 2009 model RX for almost 10 years.
We've figured out, that the newer one uses thinner metal on doors and the trunk area. While it has some foam mats on the inner side of the door cards, the doors are thin and hollow. After "upgrading" my car, we went to his Lexus, since the effect was noticeable. He did all 4 doors and the hatch, additionally adding some foam to the hatch cover. Since then, the noise went down, and mostly comes from the sunroof, especially when you enter a tunnel.

The Lexus is by far a quieter car than our RAV4, even without any additional measures. We've tried to find the differences and to do the same on my RAV4, but there is not much we could do.
It looks like it has a different body/frame design and/or some thicker metal applied on critical parts. It has better aerodynamics, different roof rails, different windshield assembly, the wheel liners are made of some kind of a felt material, which dampens the tire and road noise, and the trunk is higher. On top, the trunk area is covered with carpet, which mitigates the noise better then our plastic trim. The car has a V6 engine, and is heavier.

It also comes with laminated windows at front, while rear ones are standard single layer. The weatherstrips are of the same design, with only difference that rear side windows stick better with the guides as it is the case on our RAV4s. The rear windows feel stiff when you press on them, unlike like on our RAV4s. There are also additional strips on the door ends between the door edge and the C-pillars. I've added the same on mine, but without any noise improvement. They only keep the dirt out from entering the gap. We did not dig much deeper yet and did not open the roof liner or any A-pillar covers, so cannot talk on this yet. But you are right about S-Class, they put foam everywhere they can. The same applies to BMW 7-series.

I've been driving the 2015 NX 250 for a few days last summer. While the wind noise is much better compared to RAV4, the road and engine noise were pretty much noticeable. Not sure if it is any better on the newer NX with hybrid powertrain, but will check it out by the next possibility.

I've been also driving the 2019 Camry for about 6 weeks, before getting my RAv4. The Camry has better wind noise, but the wheel wells are not sound deadened at all. When you drive on a rainy day, you feel every single drop hitting the wheel liner.

Recently, I visited the Subaru Forester forum, following the link from one of the contributors here. While there are some complaints on older Foresters regarding NVH, there is not a single one addressing the latest Forester model. It looks like they did a proper job here.

I wonder if Toyota did something on the 2023 RAV4 to mitigate the noise. That would be a real and easy adoptable help for all of us. Could not find any full reviews including extended test drive or comparison yet. Only videos and praising announcements so far.
 

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This video has a nice discussion on tire noise. I have looked into after market addition of foam to tires, but the only video I found ended up removing it later due to it not sticking well. I did find another video showing how to repair foam in noise reduction tires, so possibly just need to use the proper adhesive.

Here is the Hankook tire mentioned in the video above.
 

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This video has a nice discussion on tire noise. I have looked into after market addition of foam to tires, but the only video I found ended up removing it later due to it not sticking well. I did find another video showing how to repair foam in noise reduction tires, so possibly just need to use the proper adhesive.

Here is the Hankook tire mentioned in the video above.
The sound absorb mentioned in this video was tested by car and driver, it has minimal effect inside car,

Average Sound Level
Insulated tiresStandard tires
Concrete with expansion joints, 70 mph69 dBA70 dBA
Concrete with expansion joints, 45 mph64 dBA64 dBA
Smooth asphalt, 70 mph64 dBA64 dBA
Smooth asphalt, 45 mph58 dBA57 dBA
 

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in this youtube video of 2023 Lexus ES350 review, it seems firewall and side walls (strut bay) of engine bay are padded by sound absorb/insulation material. According to the two reviewers, ES350 is quieter than LX350 and NX350.
 
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