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In my experience, sound proofing the roof and doors pays the biggest dividends in sound reduction for road noise. If its engine noise that is bothering you then obviously a focus on the fire wall / hood is warranted.
As to the roof. . . If you have no sunroof it's usually a fairly easy job and it will really make a difference. If you have the moon roof then its going to be more of a pain but there is still plenty of roof structure to deaden. With the Pano sunroof, I can't see it making much difference (but of course every little bit will help)
As to the doors . . . The RAV's doors really sound and feel undampened. Based on Sunken's experience they are completely untreated from the factory and I would expect a big improvement in road noise reduction. It should also help to reduce many of the rattles and help with mid bass for the sound system.
One hard lesson I learned is that it is best to do this type of work in warmer temps. All the plastic bits and pieces that you are prying off are MUCH more likely to crack / break in colder temps so find a warm garage or wait till warmer temps. The sound deadening sheets will also be much easier to apply in warmer temps.
At least for now, I won't be joining y'all on this project. Our XSE is the wife's daily driver and there is no way she will approve of the disassembly needed for this project on a new vehicle. Have fun!
Curious as to why applying material to the roof helps road noise. Does it just dampen resonate frequencies?
 

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Once the trunk done, I made my way to the rear panel. Onceagain these are super easy to remove. Simply remove the 2 metal hooks. One is a10mm and the other a 15mm if I recall. There is also a Philip screw to removeand the rest is simply pried off.
I had a pretty difficult time trying to remove the rear wheel well panel. I removed the two metal hooks and the push pin? (I didn't see the philip screw) but the panel seemed interlocked with other pieces I struggled with pulling off the white pins on the four doors and saw the same white pins in rear panel so I gave up. Any tips?
 

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Discussion Starter #145
I had a pretty difficult time trying to remove the rear wheel well panel. I removed the two metal hooks and the push pin? (I didn't see the philip screw) but the panel seemed interlocked with other pieces I struggled with pulling off the white pins on the four doors and saw the same white pins in rear panel so I gave up. Any tips?
The side pannel is ''lock-in'' by the pannel next to the rear seats, Fold down the rear seats and make your way from there. It's really hard to explain sorry i cannot be of more help.
 

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I've just discovered a cheap method to counter the noise. Sure, the butyl mats are necessary for the door skins. So I had a pack of 2mm thick ones to cover both the inner and outer sides of the doors. Because I had a pair of 8 inches installed in the rear doors, once the bass hit, it rattles. So I had to dig out all the rattling parts. Tied up all the loose cables, thicken the surrounding of the woofers by adding another layer of butyl. But still, there are rattles.
After walking around home depot, I brought 10ft of 10mm thick carpet underlay. Plus a bottle of 3M spray adhesive. Curtained up the door card, stick another piece behind the woofers. Gosh, this 10 dollars of carpet underlay really works. Since I had so much materials, I then did the cargo area. I gotta tell you, this is a really cheap be effective fix.

99cents for each foot length, they are about 8ft wide. 13 bucks for the adhesive. Gosh, this is the cheapest effective mod I had done. Don;t get me wrong, you still need to butyl up the doors as toyota is really good at making thin metal.
 

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I've just discovered a cheap method to counter the noise. Sure, the butyl mats are necessary for the door skins. So I had a pack of 2mm thick ones to cover both the inner and outer sides of the doors. Because I had a pair of 8 inches installed in the rear doors, once the bass hit, it rattles. So I had to dig out all the rattling parts. Tied up all the loose cables, thicken the surrounding of the woofers by adding another layer of butyl. But still, there are rattles.
After walking around home depot, I brought 10ft of 10mm thick carpet underlay. Plus a bottle of 3M spray adhesive. Curtained up the door card, stick another piece behind the woofers. Gosh, this 10 dollars of carpet underlay really works. Since I had so much materials, I then did the cargo area. I gotta tell you, this is a really cheap be effective fix.

99cents for each foot length, they are about 8ft wide. 13 bucks for the adhesive. Gosh, this is the cheapest effective mod I had done. Don;t get me wrong, you still need to butyl up the doors as toyota is really good at making thin metal.
Sorry to be critical but doors are not designed to keep all water out of the door cavity. There are drains at the bottom to let any water ingress out. I gotta ask what happens when your carpet underlayment gets soaking wet?
 

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Discussion Starter #148
I've just discovered a cheap method to counter the noise. Sure, the butyl mats are necessary for the door skins. So I had a pack of 2mm thick ones to cover both the inner and outer sides of the doors. Because I had a pair of 8 inches installed in the rear doors, once the bass hit, it rattles. So I had to dig out all the rattling parts. Tied up all the loose cables, thicken the surrounding of the woofers by adding another layer of butyl. But still, there are rattles.
After walking around home depot, I brought 10ft of 10mm thick carpet underlay. Plus a bottle of 3M spray adhesive. Curtained up the door card, stick another piece behind the woofers. Gosh, this 10 dollars of carpet underlay really works. Since I had so much materials, I then did the cargo area. I gotta tell you, this is a really cheap be effective fix.

99cents for each foot length, they are about 8ft wide. 13 bucks for the adhesive. Gosh, this is the cheapest effective mod I had done. Don;t get me wrong, you still need to butyl up the doors as toyota is really good at making thin metal.
Just make sure this material does not absorb water or else you're door are going to rot eventually. You'd be surprised the amount of water that goes there.
 

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I'd imagine it would be pretty easy to check periodically to see if there's any issues going on. Just like you'd check any other area of the car. Good call on the carpet underlay though. I may try that. I'm also thinking of finding some of the acoustic foam and trying to fill in the air gaps with that. I'd imagine it'd have the same risk though of holding water though.
 

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I'd imagine it would be pretty easy to check periodically to see if there's any issues going on. Just like you'd check any other area of the car. Good call on the carpet underlay though. I may try that. I'm also thinking of finding some of the acoustic foam and trying to fill in the air gaps with that. I'd imagine it'd have the same risk though of holding water though.
So you are going to pull off your door panels to periodically check to see if the water absorbent carpet underlayment is wet? My experience with door interiors on a few different vehicles is that a large amount of water gets inside on a regular basis. In fact it is prudent to periodicaly clean the drains that may or may not be hidden underneath the weather-stripping.
Sorry but it is simply a bad idea to put any sort of water absorbing material inside the door cavity. It will be soaking wet after it rains.
 

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This is honestly the first I've ever heard of water getting into the doors of a car. If water was getting inside of my car doors, I'd be more worried about an electrical short with the wiring than anything. I really doubt there is anything to worry about with putting sound deadening into the doors. Whether or not it can absorb water. As long as it absorbs the sound, I'm good.
 

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Water definitely gets inside the doors. It then drains out tiny openings at the bottom. There is typically a plastic sheet seal between the inner trim panel and the metal of the door, as a barrier between the inner door cavity and the passenger compartment. But yeah, it is routine to get water inside the door. The rubber trim on the outside of the glass is not fully sealed, and the cavity inside the door is not by any means watertight. It is watertight from the cavity to the passenger compartment, but the cavity itself routinely is exposed to water.

You definitely do not want to put anything in that door cavity that is absorbent.
 

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Sorry to be critical but doors are not designed to keep all water out of the door cavity. There are drains at the bottom to let any water ingress out. I gotta ask what happens when your carpet underlayment gets soaking wet?
I've probably did not explain it details enough. I got the underlay between the door card and the inner metal skin. Only a very small patch was stick to the metal panel behind the speaker using the glue. Yes, I was aware of the water issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #155
Does anyone have a handy guide for removing the door elements to install the sound deadening? I'm terrified of breaking the clips!
Voila


Happy to answer any questions if it's missing something.
 

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Voila


Happy to answer any questions if it's missing something.
Legend! I thought I had seen a guide somewhere but I couldn't spot it - thanks for the write-up.
 

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Water definitely gets inside the doors. It then drains out tiny openings at the bottom. There is typically a plastic sheet seal between the inner trim panel and the metal of the door, as a barrier between the inner door cavity and the passenger compartment. But yeah, it is routine to get water inside the door. The rubber trim on the outside of the glass is not fully sealed, and the cavity inside the door is not by any means watertight. It is watertight from the cavity to the passenger compartment, but the cavity itself routinely is exposed to water.

You definitely do not want to put anything in that door cavity that is absorbent.
Exactly. Most doors are designed this way and have been for a long time. Where do you think the water on your window goes when you roll it down? It's not a waterproof seal.

Bad idea to line the inside of the door this way because whatever you are putting in there will certainly get wet. Ugh.
 

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I plan on adding 80mil Noico to the 4 doors this weekend.

Anyone have any suggestions on technique when applying the sound deadener? I read cutting it into 4-inch strips speeds things up. A few videos on YouTube actually create a template using clear plastic and cut it out

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #159
I plan on adding 80mil Noico to the 4 doors this weekend.

Anyone have any suggestions on technique when applying the sound deadener? I read cutting it into 4-inch strips speeds things up. A few videos on YouTube actually create a template using clear plastic and cut it out

Thanks!
Small strip work the best. There are a lot of tight area to work around.
 
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