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Discussion Starter #1
We haven't ended summer just yet, but we should take care of some of this stuff. Now is the time.


1. Car Battery
Take your vehicle to a qualified technician, who will perform a heavy-load test procedure. This is especially important if your car still has its original battery and has been in service for three or more years.

2. Electrical System
Have your car's electrical system tested by a qualified technician.

3. Radiator
Check for adequate anti-freeze/coolant. The first really cold day could be too late and too late can cost you a new engine.

4. Tires
Tire pressure and tread depth mean good traction. The more your tires are worn, the less traction you'll have when it snows. As the temperature drops, so does tire pressure, so check tires regularly.

5. Lights
Winter days are shorter and darker. If other drivers can't see you because of a blown bulb, you could put yourself and others at risk.

6. Brakes
Have your brakes checked by a qualified technician. You don't want to discover bad brakes in the middle of a panic stop on a cold, slippery day.

7. Winter Wiper Blades
Yes, WINTER wiper blades. Purchase these ingenious devices with a thin, rubber membrane - they shed snow and ice to prevent clogging. Used only during winter, they can last several years.

8. Windshield Washer Fluid
Fill windshield washer reservoir with proper WINDSHIELD WASHER anti-freeze.

9. Rubber Weather Stripping
Spray silicone lubricant on rubber weather stripping around doors and windows to help them from freezing shut.

10. Door Locks
Spray graphite lubricant in car door locks.


Source, Motor Week! :wink:

8)
 
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hmmm.....interesting on the brakes one....its exactly opposite (sorta) of what i would want. Yes, it is important to have proper brakes, and they should be maintained and checked on a REGULAR basis, not just before winter.

Anywho, if I was on a slippery, winter day, I would not want to preform a "panic" stop in such conditions. Being a native Michigan driver (And I don't mean the wussy stuff the flatlanders downstate call winter), I learned one thing, NO SUDDEN STOPS. It just cause a loss of traction that can put you into a slide and make the situation worse. If my brakes are slightly worn, than it will allow the wheels to spin just a lil longer, thus giving me a slightly better stop.

This said, I have one thing to add. You wouldn't need to make "panic" stops if you pay attention, and if you stop following too close for conditions. I often get tailgated in winter, and in some of the worst times. Please, drive safe and responsible. Esspecially those in SUVs; you think you are safe with your AWD/4x4, but ice is ice, and you will lose it on it no matter what kind of vehicle you have. I have seen waaay too many flipped SUVs because the driver got cocky and drove too fast for what they were capable of. (Oh, and alot of them were Detroiters, proving once again, people from that area just can't drive worth **** in winter)(and no, that comment does not include some of the outlyinng Jackson communities, they at least have ice storms, and those can be alot more dangerous than most snow storms)
 

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Yeah, uh huh, that's right. There is this one guy I know in Jackson that can drive in that **** 8) (can't imagine who that is :p )

But how right you are. So many people in the bottom of the state can NOT drive in snow. OMG! But up north, holy cow! you guys get snow. To the extreme. I'm not so sure I'd like having a 2WD RAV up there :lol: BTW, I like doing those sudden stops :twisted: they're quite fun as long as no one is in front of ya :lol:
 

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I have an uncle in NY that has had his part of slippery and sliding in the snow. He has to commute from NJ to NY everyday. In the winter he only uses a 4WD Tacoma. He has ABS. A good set of snow tires, with chains on all four [when needed]. He also has it four inches higher, with a front winch. It doesn't matter. It is not the way you are going. It is how the other guy is going.

He tells me that eventhough you can have whatever, but when it starts to really fall. Visibility is short, and the pile ups are just overwhelming.

The worst part is that you might be prepaired. But if everyone else isn't. You are in a traffic jam for miles and no where to go :x . Just pullout that thermo and wait until you can truck by.
 
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Yeah, the snow can get pretty bad up here sometimes (even worse where I went to school). 2wd can manage just fine, as long as it is FWD. I used to drive a 1990 Nissan Maxima just fine. There were times when it wouldn't make it, and that is when I stole the 'rents Exploder :twisted: Lets just say i am amazed I never got it stuck. The Maxima was fun though. I used to have this tight, hilly, twisty road that no one else drove, and I would use the ice and stuff to slide the corners, including a few hairpins at the bottom of hills. I still would take a snow storm over an ice storm any day. I had to drive in a few ice storms, and it sucks here cause it ices up the whole hill side, than you can't get up the hill.

Oh, and as for when no one is around, well....That is when we see how far I can go sideways 8) I had a habit of powersliding corners up in MQT. Drove my friends nuts. Takin them home at 3 am, in the middle of gettin a few fet (merely a dusting to a yooper), and sliding about a block length sideways into my next corner....mmmm.....fun. :twisted: :twisted:
 
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sorry to bring up an old thread, but its the time of year...

Extra Tip:

The cold weather is tough on all rubber and plastic in the engine bay, therefore, it's a good idea to spray SILICON LUBE on all rubber/plastic parts and especially belts. This protects them from tearing and cracking.
While your at it, spray some lithium grease on metal parts you want to protect (I do this once a month all year).
 

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Does anyone have a good link explaining the use of tire chains? There are quite a few places up here in Alaska that are only reachable in winter with chains or serious mud/snow tires on your vehicle. Are they kind of pointless most of the time if you already have studded snow tires and 4WD?
 
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