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Discussion Starter #1
I still have the original functioning TPMS sensors on the 2009. I figure it has got to be near the end of the battery life. How many years are most people getting out of the original OEM units?

I'm also close to needing a third set of tires for this vehicle which now has about 85,000 miles on it, so this would be the time to get new TPMS sensors. I buy my tires online and use an independent garage to mount and balance them. Since I have a full size spare, I will be getting 5 sensors. It looks like I can buy the Denso 550-0103 sensors for $25 each plus shipping from an online E-Bay seller. Any thoughts on those?
 

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I still have the original functioning TPMS sensors on the 2009. I figure it has got to be near the end of the battery life. How many years are most people getting out of the original OEM units?

I'm also close to needing a third set of tires for this vehicle which now has about 85,000 miles on it, so this would be the time to get new TPMS sensors. I buy my tires online and use an independent garage to mount and balance them. Since I have a full size spare, I will be getting 5 sensors. It looks like I can buy the Denso 550-0103 sensors for $25 each plus shipping from an online E-Bay seller. Any thoughts on those?
Three sets of tires in 85k? I got 36k out of the OEM Toyos and 42k on Michelin Defenders with 7-8/32s left on them.
 

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I've read on this forum that the TPMS batteries last 7-8 years. They are still OK on my 2009.
When mine die I'm going to use the "black tape" method to cover up the warning light since I went for decades without that idiot light and I will go further without it.:smile
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Three sets of tires in 85k? I got 36k out of the OEM Toyos and 42k on Michelin Defenders with 7-8/32s left on them.
I got about 32,000 out of the OEM's with 5 tire rotation, and my Michelin Defenders (4 tire rotation) have 53,000 with about 5/32s on the worst tire. I could probably go another 8 to 10 K on the Defenders, but the sidewalls are cracking due to Sun damage (I live in Florida). I just don't feel safe doing a Summer vacation the way the tires are. Michelin has the $70 rebate going on until the end of the month, and Walmart has a decent price on Defenders right now. I expect this is the last year for that model.
 

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I bought my 2006 V6 4.3 in Mar '06, the TPMS system was still working fine in Feb '15 when I sold it.
 

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I still have the original functioning TPMS sensors on the 2009. I figure it has got to be near the end of the battery life. How many years are most people getting out of the original OEM units?

I'm also close to needing a third set of tires for this vehicle which now has about 85,000 miles on it, so this would be the time to get new TPMS sensors. I buy my tires online and use an independent garage to mount and balance them. Since I have a full size spare, I will be getting 5 sensors. It looks like I can buy the Denso 550-0103 sensors for $25 each plus shipping from an online E-Bay seller. Any thoughts on those?
No problems with the OEM TPMS sensors on my 2009 and if it ain't broke, won't fix it! If and when they do fail, I guess I'd go the black tape route and ignore the icon until those wheels need new tires since it's not a critical safety item IMO.

That seems like a good deal on the Denso sensors if true. FWIW I had some Discount Tire generic sensors installed on my snow wheels for $60 a pop, but that includes lifetime reset when switching with rotation to summer wheels and back to OEM sensors. Toyota dealer was at least double that price.
 

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Each TPMS sensor has a 3 volt lithium cell inside with a life span of 8-10 years. According to Techstream, the voltage on all 5 of my sensors is good.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I bought 5 of these sensors:

TPMS Sensor-OE Manufactured DENSO 550-0103 | eBay

Only one left, but deals like this come up periodically. The problem may be the age, but I guess if they have not been activated, the lithium battery should be good for another 8 years (hopefully).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Each TPMS sensor has a 3 volt lithium cell inside with a life span of 8-10 years. According to Techstream, the voltage on all 5 of my sensors is good.
Interesting. I didn't know the Tech Stream could measure the TPMS battery voltage. I'll have to hook it up and see what it says before I get the tires and new sensors changed. I guess there should be no problem registering the new sensors with my PC Tech Stream? Thanks for the info.

Also, looking at your next post and using that part#, I could have purchased these for under $20 a piece.

C'est la vie
 

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Interesting. I didn't know the Tech Stream could measure the TPMS battery voltage. I'll have to hook it up and see what it says before I get the tires and new sensors changed. I guess there should be no problem registering the new sensors with my PC Tech Stream? Thanks for the info.

Also, looking at your next post and using that part#, I could have purchased these for under $20 a piece.

C'est la vie
Techstream doesn't actually show the battery voltage, just an Over/Normal/Under indicator:

 

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Discussion Starter #12
OK, I just connected up the Tech Stream and found that the battery condition on one of the sensors is 'less'. The other 4 are all 'over'. There was also an error for the tire pressure ECU unable to read sensor.... although it appeared at this time it was reading normally on all of them. I erased the code and recorded all the ID #'s. I also identified all the codes versus current tire positions, by deflating each tire 1 at a time and watching the Tech Stream monitor. There did not seem to be a standard pattern since the ID's 1 through 5 came out as follows: Left front, Spare, Right front, Right rear, Left rear.
I also checked out the registration wizard and I shouldn't have a problem deleting and adding the new sensors.

Here is a picture of the screen after I adjusted the 4 tires (left spare alone):

 

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Discussion Starter #13
OK... I got all the sensors installed and my new tires mounted. Everything went good except I had to drill out 2 of the valves because the sensor retaining nut-sleeves were rusted on. I broke the nut, but the sleeve was rusted on solid.

I recorded the numbers of all the new sensors and registered them using the Tech Stream PC version. It is simply a matter of inputting the codes one at a time until all five tires are registered. Nothing to delete regarding the old sensors. It was really quite easy and then you can read each tires pressure and inflate or deflate the tires to the desired spec, all while reading just the screen.

One important step: The sensor valve nuts are initially torqued to 30 in-lb and then must be re-torqued after the tire is mounted and inflated. It took at least 1/2 a turn to get them back to 30 in-lb, presumably because the rubber grommet compresses a tiny bit when the tire is fully aired up.
 
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I don't look forward to this replacement. Her '08 was built in '07, mine in '08. Both are on original tires and factory mounted TPMS sensors. Mileage on both are low (under 25K) but time is long.
 

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I don't look forward to this replacement. Her '08 was built in '07, mine in '08. Both are on original tires and factory mounted TPMS sensors. Mileage on both are low (under 25K) but time is long.
I would replace those tires right away, they are candidates for tread separation. I had a tire fail, and nearly crashed the vehicle. Afterwards I learned quite a bit about the issue.

When making modern radial tires, they add an adhesive to help adhere the outer tread to the steel belts. This adhesive will break down with age - even if the tires are stored in a dark, temperature controlled, vacuum, it will still break down. This process is only guaranteed for 6 years. Once the adhesive has broken down the two leading variables for tread separation are speed, and temperature. As the temperature goes up, the rubber will become more pliable, and as the speed increases, there is more centrifugal forces pulling on the tread. Eventually, this can lead to tread separation.
 
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