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WHEN I need it I will most likely do 3 trans fluid changes in the car's lifetime, One at 30k because I have 347 miles on it (yep it is brand new) the second change will be at 90k and last one 150k by 200k I am changing out the vehicle by that time anyway
 

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This Rav4 is my wife's daily driver. She's a pretty conservative driver, won't go more then 5mph over the speed limit when on the highway. I hate driving with her, I'm a lead foot.

Having to use her car for several day's, I noticed when getting on the highway that there was a slight stumble when shifting between 4th and 5th gear. Other then that, everything seemed normal. The car now has a little over 66K miles. I bought it with 22K miles on it, was clean as a whistle and came with all the service records.

After not finding a tranny dip stick I realized that the Rav4 has a "Sealed" tranny just like my 17 Murano. I went online searching and came across a bunch of posts and the 38 minute video about checking/changing the "Sealed" tranny fluid. Pretty daunting, started to think that I wouldn't be able to do it, and I've rebuilt manual/auto trannies and engines. Not one to give up easily, and really hate having anyone else work on my vehicles, I went ahead and ordered a tranny filter kit and 8 qts of Toyota WS tranny fluid. This tranny holds 6.9 qts.

The car set in my garage for several days, at about 50 degrees F this time of year, until the filter and oil came in. Set the parking brake, turned the front wheels to the left, jacked up the car on the driver's side a little and set a jack stand. After removing the front wheel liner shield I removed the "WS" fill bolt. Removing the WS bolt confirmed my suspensions that the tranny fluid was having issues. Fluid that was on the inside of hollow WS fill bolt was brown and sticky, but didn't have a burnt smell.

I removed the underbody shield and placing a clean catch pan under the tranny, I removed the drain plug. I waited about 15 minutes figuring that the oil would be draining slowly due to the temp. Next the level straw inside the drain plug opening was removed, again waiting about 15 minutes. The tranny oil pan bolts came out pretty easily except for a few that needed a small shot of JB Blaster. The tranny oil pan still held about 3/4 qt of fluid even after there wasn't anything coming out of the drain hole. Removed the tranny filter and another 1/2 qt of fluid came out.

Examining the inside of the tranny oil pan, both magnets had a good coating of particles and the bottom of the pan had a thin layer of sludge. Pouring the tranny fluid into a clean old oil jug filled it to about the 3 7/8 qt mark. The oil was a dark heavy brown, nothing like tranny fluid, but no burnt smell.

After waiting a good hour for everything to stop dripping, excess fluid was mopped up, gasket area cleaned and new filter installed. Cleaned, installed level straw, drain plug and installed the pan with a new gasket, without any gasket sealer, and poured 4 qts of tranny fluid into the tranny thru the WS drain plug hole using a long flex necked funnel.

Wanting to fully flush out the old tranny fluid, I decided that I'd try using the engine to pump out the old tranny fluid. After removing the return (Upper line from the tranny to the cooler.) hose that goes to the 5" round tranny cooler located at the front of the engine from the metal return line, a 3/8" clear hose was inserted into the return tranny hose and the other end of the clear hose was stuck in to another clean old oil jug.

The low pressure flow rate out of the return hose while the car is running is about one qt per 5 - 6 seconds, so you don't have to worry about the pan getting sucked dry quickly. I had a helper adding tranny fluid while the old fluid was pumping out to maintain the fluid level in the tranny. Most tranny pans will hold 4 qts of tranny fluid when dry before getting close to the overflow tube, varying upon the manufacturer.

After opening 3 qts of tranny fluid the engine was started. As tranny fluid flowed out into the jug, new tranny fluid was poured into the funnel left in the WS fill hole. After about 2 1/2 qts flowed into the jug, it started to turn red. Let the engine run for about another 2 seconds and ended up with a fluid level in the jug just under 3 qts. Finished pouring in the third qt of fluid into the tranny.

Installed and tightened the WS fill bolt, removed the jack stand and let the car down off the jack. Started the car and waited for the engine temp gauge to go up. Got under the car and using a Temp gun aimed at the tranny oil pan, waited until the tranny oil pan was at about 109 degrees F. Removed the drain plug and about 1/4 cup of tranny fluid came out before going to a pencil lead thin stream that immediately slowed to a steady dribble. I then replaced the drain plug and tightened it up. Wiped everything down to remove all the tranny fluid and replaced the underbody shield and front wheel well shield.

Drove the car around town doing a few errands. Shifted smooth and seemed to be a little quieter then before. Went back home, let the car cool down some and got under it to check for any leaks. Everything looked good. No sign of red fluid anywhere.

So I drove the car to where my wife works, 7 miles up the highway. Shift stumble was gone and the acceleration was smoother along with the RPM being a little lower at speed. Swapped out cars and went to do my thing.

When I got home that evening, after hearing about how when she got out of work, she thought my car was stolen before she spotted her car fiasco, she surprised me by telling me that she noticed how her Rav4 was quieter and was shifting smoother, along with being a little peppier.

I hope that this helps out others who want to fully flush out their "Sealed" tranny at home. I figure that I replaced a good 98% of the tranny fluid. I'm glad that I didn't go to one of those shops that just uses a pump to replace the fluid. The gunk on the bottom of the pan would have ended up mixing with the new fluid and I'm sure that tranny would have craped out sooner then later. Next time I have to bring the Rav4 to the dealer I'll ask them to check the tranny fluid level. Except for a few vehicle specific issues, this guide can be used to change out the tranny fluid of any "Sealed" tranny.

Have a good day. :smile

PS Anyone who want's to rewrite this as a straight walkthrough can be my guest. Sorry I didn't take any photos.

Do you happen to know if this is the same method for the Hybrid models (with the CVT transmission, rather than traditional geared)?
 

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Do you happen to know if this is the same method for the Hybrid models (with the CVT transmission, rather than traditional geared)?
Sorry, I don't have access to a hybrid to answer that.


Have a good day.
 

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Anyone know if the Torque Pro app/OBD2 can read the transmission temperature? Tried following this guide https://www.toyotanation.com/forum/122-highlander-2nd-generation-2008-2013/548746-getting-transmission-fluid-temp-using-torque-pro-android.html, but it just jumped to 329.6F after warming up for like 2 minutes (in -2 degree weather). Drove around for a bit to bring it up to temperature but no changes. Just seeing if I have something to properly check the transmission oil temperature before going deeper into doing a change.

edit. Oh wait nevermind. Going to try this now. https://www.rav4world.com/forums/1807329-post10.html
edit. And nevermind, the equation doesn't work. Tells me mismatched parentheses. Tried removing the 4 beginning brackets to 3, which worked but that gave me a temperature of 3938.2F
 

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Sorry, I don't have access to a hybrid to answer that.


Have a good day.
Hi Paulday,
I don't think you completely flushed the transmission and there is still old fluid sitting inside it. The pump suck fluid out from the oil pan, which has about 2qt before the pump start sucking air. You need to add fluid back to the return line, which connected to the upper port on the transmission. Doing so will push the old fluid out of the transmission. Adding new oil back to the oil pan will just got sucked right out. You didn't push the old fluid out of the transmission.
Gravity is not enough for the fluid to drain into the transmission return line and you need to get a hand pump. Good luck!!!
 

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Here was some picture of me adding a transmission radiator and flushing the fluid out. Used total of 12qt to compensate the radiator and new tubing.
 

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Hi Paulday,
I don't think you completely flushed the transmission and there is still old fluid sitting inside it. The pump suck fluid out from the oil pan, which has about 2qt before the pump start sucking air. You need to add fluid back to the return line, which connected to the upper port on the transmission. Doing so will push the old fluid out of the transmission. Adding new oil back to the oil pan will just got sucked right out. You didn't push the old fluid out of the transmission.
Gravity is not enough for the fluid to drain into the transmission return line and you need to get a hand pump. Good luck!!!
If you've read the change post in it's entirety, engine was run until clean new fluid started coming out of the drain tube from the return line. I've used this method for well over 35 years and never had an issue. Every time when checking fluid after changing it still looks brand new after running for at least an hour. I don't believe that would be the case if there was more then a pint of old fluid left in the tranny.

Have a good day.

PS All tranny fluid is drawn up thru the filter before being circulated thru the tranny and cooling line, from the oil pan. Keep it full and you won't have an issue.
 

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Hi Paulday,
With all the respect, I wasn't trying to say anything negative but the fact is the transmission has fluid flow pattern for every gear. To completely flush out the old fluid we actually has to change to different gear to let new fluid purging the old out. The WS fill plug is there to top off the fluid level and it go directly to the oil pan. The only way to purge it properly is pumping new fluid to the return line and change gears while new fluid was delivering to the transmission. What you did is OK and not going to harm anything. The old fluid will be mixed with the new fluid as you drive. On older car people prefer not flushing out the transmission completely since it might cause transmission slippage. The residue inside the old fluid actually help prevent old transmission slipping.

Best Regards,

CKW
 

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Wanting to fully flush out the old tranny fluid, I decided that I'd try using the engine to pump out the old tranny fluid. After removing the return (Upper line from the tranny to the cooler.) hose that goes to the 5" round tranny cooler located at the front of the engine from the metal return line, a 3/8" clear hose was inserted into the return tranny hose and the other end of the clear hose was stuck in to another clean old oil jug.
Do you have a picture of this return hose? I don't want to mess this up. Thanks
 

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I know there is a red tube. it's the overflow tube. I'm worried about getting the fill plug out. the video you attached is on the net and I've seen that. He uses the machine to fill from the drain plug hole, not the fill hole. That video doesn't help me unless I find a tube/pump to fit inside the overflow tube hole (not sure of the diameter of the tube hole) and fill the trans that way. Then I won't have to get the fill plug out but if I am not successful, then it's a tow to the dealer. embarrassing.
wrong he uses filling side i,ve that video bunch of time
 

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Copied from a member named Gilligan2017'

Rav4 Transmission Change

How to drain and fill a Toyota with the 660U or 760U transmissions that do NOT have a dipstick. The "sealed" description is wrong. A fill port exists behind the driver’s side front wheel engine cover panel. Look for a large 24mm bolt.

I've created this to help you guys who have heard that this transmission is sealed and have shied away from doing it yourself. This cost about $70. I hope you can use it and not have to go to one of those dealerships.

The tools Toyota sells for doing this are for shops that need to work on extremely hot transmissions because they don't have time to start with a cool unit for checking the final level of the fluid. This procedure will work for the DIY at home in a garage.

Toyota claims that their WS Transaxle fluid will last for the life of the car and also doesn’t say when to replace the power steering fluid. Any fluid which services moving parts needs replacement as with time it deteriorates. There are several complex reasons for it, too long to be explained here, but involve the chemical breakdown of the oil and fluids from the internal friction and heats it is exposed to over time.

I changed the fluid on a Camry with 116,000 miles on its original fluid and it was squid ink black.

This drain and fill will rectify the problem if your transmission hesitates before shifting from 1st to 2nd OR 2nd to 3rd gear when cold and when the engine just revs up without going into the next gear. Do this before you ever consider taking your car to a shop for transaxle problems.

Valvoline MaxLife Synthetic Transmission fluid will mix with Toyota's WS fluid without any issues and is cost effective and a much higher quality fluid.

Here is what I found that worked.

The Basics:

• Transmissions are used on rear wheel drive vehicles. Transaxles are used on front wheel drive vehicles.
• Engines and gear boxes use oil, transmissions and transaxles use hydraulic fluids. Both are oils but the hydraulic fluids have a special quality that makes them uncompressible in pressurized spaces.
• This procedure is for Toyotas with U660 and U760 transaxles. These transmissions do NOT have a dip stick.
• The total Transaxle fluid capacity of a U660 or U760 is approx. 6.7 quarts.
• The full quantity of transmission fluid can’t be replaced unless you dismantle it totally and then reassemble it OR you hook up a flushing machine by tapping into the input & return pipes of the transmission oil which are connected to the heat exchanger. Both these options are complex, time consuming and expensive.
TOOLS YOU WILL NEED:
1. 6 mm hex socket & ratchet or long handled 6mm Allen Wrench.
2. 10 mm socket & ratchet.
3. 24 mm socket & ratchet.
4. 18” of socket extensions.
5. One bobble head or universal joint.
6. Foot Pound and Inch Pound Torque wrenches. These can be rented at most automotive parts stores. The inch pound wrench is important as I have seen many transaxle pan bolt holes stripped from over tightening. The inch pound wrench is only required for reinstalling the pan bolts to torque if you are changing the filter.
7. Infra-red temperature gun. (For a level check.)
8. Funnel & Plastic pipe
9. Jack (This can be done without putting the car on stands. They just make the reach to the pan bottom easier.)
10. 4 - jack stands. Car must be level for fluid level setting.
11. Wheel chocks.
12. Drain pan. Short and wide if doing this without the jacks
13. Rags/gloves

TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS (from the Toyota Service Manual)


• 6 mm hex socket bolt overflow plug to 30 lbs.-foot
• Transaxle pan filler tube under the hex socket to 7-inch pounds. (Barely finger tight)
• 10 mm pan bolts to 66-inch pounds.
• 24 mm refill port bolt with crush washer to 36 lbs.-ft.

SUPPLIES
Valvoline MaxLife - two 5-quart containers.
12 oz. Lube Guard Supplement for transmissions.

HOW TO DO IT:

1, Make sure the car has been parked overnight and everything is at room temperature.

2. Turn the steering wheel fully to the left.

3. Jack up the car 3-4 inches leaving the wheels mounted. Car must be lifted on all four corners to level for correct setting of fluid level. (This whole process can be done without jacking up the car as long as you have a wide shallow oil catch pan that fits under your car.)

4. Remove the two 10 mm bolts on the left (driver’s side) side wheel well plastic shield. Push the shield downward, it will pivot on a hidden plastic plug, until the 24mm fill bolt becomes reachable,

5. Loosen the 24 mm oil fill bolt & remove it. If you can’t remove the fill plug, do NOT continue! If you drain the fluid first and can't remove the 24 mm bolt you have disabled the vehicle and will need a tow to a shop.

6. With your drain pan in place, loosen the 6 mm hex bolt on the bottom of the transaxle pan. Be careful to not to lose the crush sealing washer. Be careful, hex bolts are notorious for getting a stripped head, so be sure to insert the hex socket fully into the bolt before trying to loosen it.

7. As soon as you remove the drain bolt, fluid will drain out for approximately 5 minutes. Once it stops draining, move to the next step.

8. Using the same 6 mm hex socket, reach in the drain hole with the hex socket and unscrew the plastic fill-level tube. It’s screwed in loosely and will come out easily. Just use the hex socket and your fingers to prevent damaging it. There is no O-ring on it.

9. Once you remove the plastic overfill tube, more transaxle fluid will drain out for about 5 minutes.

10. That’s it, nothing more will come out. At this point you can pull the pan and replace the filter. Reinstall the drain bolt and the plastic overfill tube

11. Using a measuring bottle, verify the exact quantity of oil drained into the drain pan. It should be about 3 quarts.

12. Refill the transaxle with the same amount of fluid. 3 quarts of transaxle fluid is what is listed in the Toyota Service Manual.

13. Start the engine keeping it at idle, watch the temperature of the fluid by pointing the infra-red thermometer into the fill hole. You will be able to see fluid flowing through the hole and by gently shifting the direction of the gun you will be able to tell when you are actually reading the fluid and not the case. The fluid will become hotter than the metal case.

14. Once the fluid reaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit pull the hex drain plug and let the fluid drain with the engine still running. When the fluid flow reduces to a trickle or spurts the transaxle is at the correct level. This must be done with the engine running. As the engine will continue to heat the fluid to higher temps you must start this immediately upon reaching 104 degrees and be finished before it reaches 113 degrees to be accurate.

15. Install the drain plug,

16. Turn off the engine.

17. Torque all bolts to specs.

Do this three times over three different days adding the Lube Guard to the last fill. This procedure will replace about 2/3rds of the total fluid and the Lube Guard will make up for the old fluid left in the transaxle.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: (This was posted by another member not me.)

IMO, Gilligan2017's instructions and the post #7 video would apply to any sealed transaxle using the plastic fill-level tube method to set the correct fluid level.
But since the procedure relies on heating the fluid to set the level, the filling section of both his instructions and the video can be simplified. Here's how:
Steps 1 thru 10, and the first 6 minutes of the video, involve draining the fluid (and changing the filter if desired).
Edit: I'm wondering why ANY fluid would drain in step 7 unless the transaxle was overfilled initially.
At this point reinstall the fill-level tube (called the overflow tube in the video) but not the drain plug as step 10 says and he does at 7:55.
There is really no need to measure the amount of fluid that came out as step 11 says or he does at 8:30. So skip step 11.
In step 12 simply add new fluid until it starts to run out. Remember the drain plug isn't installed yet.
Steps 13 & 14 gets simplified because with no drain plug the excess fluid will simply drain out the fill-level tube as it warms up. When the temperature hits 104F reinstall the plug step 15 and the level is correctly set with less fiddling with the drain plug and handling warm oil in step 14 or as he does from 10:55 to 12:10. I would highly recommend using an OBDII connected temperature measurement device like the ScanGauge he uses in the video. They can be set to monitor many different data streams from any vehicle or read and clear codes.
Possibly the explanation is that when the level setting procedure is done the engine is running and fluid is warm and circulating. When it's drained the car has been setting and some fluid drains back into the pan much as oil does in an engine. (That's why I prefer to do engine oil changes after the engine has sat for a few hours, not with it hot as many "experts" say.)

This whole sealed type transaxle has got me thinking that if done smart a drain & refill is actually just as easy if not easier than those with a fill/dipstick tube. As long as the transaxle is cool it's really only a few steps.

(1) Once you have the car level and have removed the fill plug
(2) Remove both the drain plug and plastic fluid level tube and drain the fluid.
(3) Reinstall the fluid level tube.
(4) Add new fluid until some starts to come out.
(5) Run the engine until the specified temperature is reached.
(6) Reinstall the drain and fill plugs.
Done!
 

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Just a fair warning. If you want to do a transmission fluid change. I warn you, don’t take it to any mechanic or Toyota dealership that will do a flush. A drain and fill is fine, but a flush is a no go! I’ve had my rav ruined because of Toyota’s flush system and they still haven’t fixed it. It’s much safer to drain and fill with the above method then taking it to Toyota to flush their “lifetime” fluid.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Hi, Where to get Transmission Filter and gasket for RAV4 2015 LE (as OEM seems very expensive)?
Any advice or recommendations?
Thank you
Picked mine up on Amazon for less then $35 for both items. This listing is for a '13 Rav4, verify for your year before purchasing.


Have a good day.
 

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Picked mine up on Amazon for less then $35 for both items. This listing is for a '13 Rav4, verify for your year before purchasing.


Have a good day.
Thank you very much for the quickreply. This doesnt fit on my 2015 LE 2.5.

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Which is funny because I took my car in a 60k for an issue and the first thing out of the dealership's mouth was that I was due to have the trans fluid changed. My comment "I thought it was lifetime". His comment "Yeah it is, but the life of the fluid is over. Time to change it.".


I guess it depends on your frame of reference as to which lifetime you are comparing it to.
Did you end up changing the transmission oil at the dealer? How much they charged you?
 
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