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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all! Today is my first time to be back on this page since my last post...nursing school is beyond life consuming...


Anyway, I have a question: I am running a set of Kumho Ecsta LX Platinum 235/60ZR16 W-speed rated tires. For handling, stability, and noise, these are the BEST set of tires I've ever installed in all of the 331,400 miles I've driven the RAV!!! Of course, this size has been discontinued in the time since I've purchased this set last year, so I have no idea what tire to replace this set with when that time comes (suggestions appreciated for my size!!)...I do currently have one tire issue, but I do know the tires aren't the cause:


The rotation pattern I follow at oil changes is just front to back, which is what the manual and dealer suggest. I had an alignment check done on the car when these tires were installed, alignment checked out fine. Had it checked again last week when I noticed the issue and was told, again, it is still at factory specs. Shocks/struts are good, no worn suspension components, and brakes aren't dragging and stop properly.


With the previous set and current set of tires, car has never pulled or shimmied at any speed, especially with these Kumho's, but the passenger side tires are wearing faster than the driver's side tires! Is anyone else experiencing this or know why this may be happening?? The two driver's side tires are just over 50% tread, the rear passenger is 35%-40% and the passenger front is at 45% tread life remaining. All tires are wearing evenly with no cupping, feathering, or noise, just faster wear on the passenger side. Is there more power going to the passenger side wheels than the left? Tires are 65,000 mile warrantied tires, but I'll most likely only get 40K out of 2 of them.
 

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The std settings have quite a wide range, but what matters in your case, is are they the same on both sides?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not sure what you mean. Are you referring to the alignment settings?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I wasn't given a print out, but he said the rear and front wheels' camber and toe had no deviation from Toyota specs. Caster isn't adjustable since it uses McPherson struts. I trust them the wheels are in fact aligned properly, as each tire is independentally wearing even, the steering wheel is dead on center when driving straight and does not pull at all when let go of. My only conclusion is that the differential or something is sending more power to the right wheel? I do know that in snow or any slippery surface, the right front wheel is always first to break loose.
 

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All I could suggest first would be to think about getting the alignment checked at a different garage if it was done previously both times at the same garage just to be sure it is done right.
 

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Like I said, the specs are quite wide, so one wheel might be at the top end of the specs and another could be at the lower end.
It would be within specs but still be wrong. Without knowing what your settings are, you cannot do anything or suspect anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So, I took it in to two different, local, independent shops. First shop I went to said the alignment is good, did notice more tire wear on the passenger side, but couldn't explain it (kept saying the tire pressure must be off - it isn't, and the pressures on the print out even showed they were all even lol). The second place told me the alignment is perfect, but also pointed out an error in the manual. They told me that I was right in that the right side drive wheels wear down faster, which is why the tire rotation pattern needs to be "crossing", not front to back like I've been doing. The last shop specialized in Honda and Toyota vehicles and honestly impressed me on how open and knowledgeable he was on everything.


Apparently, the CORRECT tire rotation should be to cross the rear tires forward and bring the front tires straight back. To offset the uneven wear, they switched the left and right tires out and then when its time to rotate again, start the correct pattern.


Car still tracks straight when unassisted and rides exactly the same as it did before they swapped tires on each side! I just wish I would have known this a long time ago.. I could have saved many miles on my previous tire sets...
 
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