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I don't think it's crazy, plenty of people in forums have talked about how they've used inverter's in their priuses to do the same thing. The only thing to be cautious and aware of is that when fridges start up their compressor, they take in more initial current (for a small fraction of a second only) than they're rated at. The older the fridge, the higher the starting current could be. It's possible for you to turn on the fridge (say 800W), then turn on a series of lights (600W worth), and get a runtime of current around say... 1400W and think everything is fine. But, when the compressor on the fridge cycles off, then back on again later, it could temporarily overload the 1500W limit on that cycle on, thus tripping the breaker in the vehicle. If that happens, you'll just have to turn off all/some of your lights to get your baseline load well under the 1500W limit.
 

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Outstanding - Thank You!

I suppose Toyota thought about extra protection so I don't overload and damage the $40k+ generator :D
The only thing you ever could accidently break is the inverter component in the car itself if that makes you feel better. There's no concern of you damaging any drivetrain components of the car because the traction battery is designed to run in the 50-100kW range during acceleration. (so about 30-70x what the 1500W inverter would output). Here's some scant details from the supplier:
 

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Volt and Bolt EV Inverter Kits Availability Coming to an End...


You may be surprised by how limited the 1500W provided by the DC/AC inverter in your Prime is. When I lost power for several days about a month ago due to a windstorm, the above 2500W inverter being fed by a Gen1 Volt was barely enough to power a couple TVs, keep the internet going and running a single fridge. Made the mistake of trying to plug in a space heater and it immediately tripped the OL protection on the inverter. Won't make that mistake again. Having 1500W avail on-the-fly will be nice but you can forget about powering everything in the house.
Anything that heats/cools objects is going to use a lot of power, period. TV's can use a moderate amount, depending on how old/energy efficient they are (my old 65" plasma that I still use runs at 250 watts). My router takes only 20 watts. My personal gaming-build PC uses 200-350, laptop capped at 60W.

Use the following guide as a starting reference point to decide what to investigate:

Then take a look at the stickers/labels on your devices, if they don't have wattage listed, take the voltage (usually 120) and multiply by the max current rating. Devices like a fridge might have a high wattage requirement (mine for example says peak is 1100 watts), but that's if the ice maker, defroster, and compressor were all running at the same time (which rarely happens), because typically I only see my home usage up by 200 watts when my fridge compressor is on.

Note: I love having an electric meter readout for my house right in my kitchen. It's helped teach/train me on what appliances use how much electricity. (kind of like how a MPG meter on your car dash helps you keep your MPG up) Sure helps keeps the utility bills low throughout the year!
 

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Sorry to reviving an old thread here, but has anyone retrofitted a Prime SE with the 120v 1500W DC-AC Inverter? Does it plug into a 12v line, or come directly off the hybrid batteries?
I haven't heard of anyone retrofitting with the OEM inverter which does connect directly to the traction battery. however, a handful of people have added a simpler 1000W inverter to the lead acid battery through the trunk.

 
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