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2006 V6 Transmission Fluid Capacity

I have a 2006 V6. How many quarts does my transmission hold overall - from bone dry (factory) to capacity? 8 quarts? 10 quarts? It doesn't say in the owner's manual as far as I can tell. Thanks.
 

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Thanks for the great thread! I am planning on getting this done when my rav hits 30k. Any idea how much $$$ a shop should charge for dropping & cleaning pan, changing filter, and refilling with fresh fluid? I really respect DIYers but I am just not up for it myself...thanks!
 

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subbed. probably a good idea for me to do this, as well as any other diff fluids involved


any write-ups for the center diff, rear, diff, recommended fluids, etc?


I believe typically when manufacturers say 'lifetime' they mean the lifetime of the warranty - dealers interpret to lifetime of the car itself


Just wanted to confirm -- will this work for a '11 V6 AWD Rav4?
http://www.amazon.com/Wix-58010-Automatic-Transmission-Filter/dp/B002NBOYZG/ref=sr_1_5?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1452894671&sr=1-5&keywords=rav4+transmission
 

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subbed. probably a good idea for me to do this, as well as any other diff fluids involved


any write-ups for the center diff, rear, diff, recommended fluids, etc?


I believe typically when manufacturers say 'lifetime' they mean the lifetime of the warranty - dealers interpret to lifetime of the car itself


Just wanted to confirm -- will this work for a '11 V6 AWD Rav4?
http://www.amazon.com/Wix-58010-Automatic-Transmission-Filter/dp/B002NBOYZG/ref=sr_1_5?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1452894671&sr=1-5&keywords=rav4+transmission


bump.. looking for input on this. I did the Corolla a while back, but not only did I swap filters, I followed this guide and emptied ALL the trans fluid:


DIY 2003-2008 Corolla, Matrix, Vibe Transmission Fluid & Strainer Replacement - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums


Wondering if I can do the same for the Rav4, just need to do the step of draining the fluid from the return line.
 

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Responding to my own post (#104) from this thread. After reading many of the excellent posts on this forum, i went ahead and got my fluids changed today - transmission - pan drop and filter changed, diffs, and brake fluid. Independent shop charged me $220 for the trans service portion. Dealer wouldnt take this approach and they only offered me a flush for trans service for $275. BTW, my 2012 Rav v6 4wd has 29k on it. The mechanic said my fluids looked fine but it gave me a peace of mind to change em so what the hell. I will probably wait a bit longer next time (he suggests 60k intervals) and just go for drain and fill but i wanted to get the filter changed early since many posters said that most wear occurs early in tran's life. I dont tow and i live in a nice climate but i occasional stomp on it just for the fun of it or when traffic permits. Of course I know cars last longer if you baby em but then whats the point of having the v6 if you drive it like an old lady right? Definitely love this Rav and want to keep it forever, well 20 years at least...although Rav EV is really tempting me...but the wife's 2009 corolla is doing just fine for her so hard to justify trading it in and spending the extra dough. Also dont want to starting parking my baby outside so the used EV can charge in our one garaged spot...
 

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Pleasantly surprised............at 54K miles I decided to do the 1st tranny pan drop/filter change this afternoon. Old/original fluid was still pinkish purple and there was virtually no metallic "fur" on the magnets. Like the original post in this thread, I went back with a Duralast tranny filter from Autozone ($18) and Valvoline synthetic tranny fluid from Walmart ($18/gal).

FWIW, I installed a auxiliary/secondary tranny cooler when our RAV4 had <12K miles so I'm thinking that has something to do with how good the old fluid looked and lack of particles. We tow 1800-1900 hundred lbs 3-4 times each summer traveling 400-600 miles each trip.:smile
 

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Pleasantly surprised............at 54K miles I decided to do the 1st tranny pan drop/filter change this afternoon. Old/original fluid was still pinkish purple and there was virtually no metallic "fur" on the magnets. Like the original post in this thread, I went back with a Duralast tranny filter from Autozone ($18) and Valvoline synthetic tranny fluid from Walmart ($18/gal).

FWIW, I installed a auxiliary/secondary tranny cooler when our RAV4 had <12K miles so I'm thinking that has something to do with how good the old fluid looked and lack of particles. We tow 1800-1900 hundred lbs 3-4 times each summer traveling 400-600 miles each trip.:smile
This will be my first try and I just want to do a drain and fill. I'll do the drop pan on my 3rd drain and refill. So it really okay to mix Valvoline synthetic tranny fluid with whatever is left of the WS fluid inside the transmission? I'm at 70K miles and the trans fluid is light brown and no burnt smell. And do I need to change the washer of the drain bolt everytime I do a drain?
 

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About 3-4 weeks after doing the tranny pan drop, filter change and re-fill, I drained and re-filled the tranny again with the Valvoline synthetic. I'm still using the same/original washer and all is good. I can tell zero, zip, nada difference in shifting after the tranny service but now I know all is fresh/clean inside.
 

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So I need help... I can't tell where my fluid level is at the moment and that really worries me. Here is what I did-

My 2012 with the V6 just hit 48,000mi so I decided to take this project on as well. This thread and others were extremely helpful! I'm not conservative when it comes to working on things I either prefer to do everything or nothing. So I felt if I was already going to be under the vehicle and putting in the effort then I was going to drop the pan and really get everything overhauled in a sense with a new filter. I didn't expect things to be really bad or make a massive difference and it was more for my own peace of mind, although my transmission has been feeling sluggish lately and also sometimes softly bucking when putting it into reverse or drive.

This project took me two days. I purchased everything from Amazon which made it easier, I also had the help of my girlfriend for part of it. I used Toyota WS. After reading so many mixed reviews on people using fluids other than it I decided to not be cheap and use their fluid this case (in other cases I am all for aftermarket fluids or filters depending). I also have a mechanical engineering friend who used to be an auto mechanic that recently swapped his Toyota WS for MaxLife and had to switch back because the transmission didn't like it.

I had planned to use a Beck Arnley filter but after a week of it being in my shopping cart I went to pull the trigger on Amazon and found out it had increased significantly in price so I went with the WIX version instead (I've read that these are mostly all made by the same manufacturer anyhow and just rebranded so it came down to my own brand and gasket material preference).

-I ordered two "cases" of WS for 8qts total
-WIX automatic transmission filter #58010 (included nice rubberish gasket and o ring)
-New fasteners that are said to be higher quality than the OE Toyota/Lexus ones that hold the splash shield on

The rest of the stuff I had around the house like an empty, sealable jug that I pre-measured and marked off qt lines to, plastic hose, tools etc.



The first day I spent to lift the front end onto jack stands, remove the splash shield, drain the atf fluid, then unscrew the pan, clean it and all the magnets out, replace filter and replace pan. Drop the car to level. Refill transmission through dipstick using the dipstick to check levels between pourings.











I converted inch/lbs to ft/lbs for the bolts on my torque wrench. I have it written down exactly but I believe it was about 8ft/lbs for the filter bolts and about 6 ft/lbs for the pan bolts. I did not use Loctite like they did from the factory. I purchased this car last September and my fluid and pan really weren't that bad but I expected this changing it around 50k and not say 80k-120k like many others. You can see in the direct sunlight that it was still reddish, it wasn't clear but it also wasn't black or super dark brown like others I've seen on the forum. The pan did have some very fine metal shaving sludge on the magnets and that felt good to get out of the transmission.

On day two I attempted the actual flush of the old fluid. I did this by moving the car from it's parked spot back into the driveway and then disconnected the ATF return line from the radiator and plugged in tubing I had lying around.





What you see here is the fluid that started coming out initially. You can see how dark it is you almost can't see through it and this is the fluid after it had been drained and filled with fresh WS and after the Rav4 had been moved from the day before to be parked and then moved again back into the garage. So it isn't exactly just the old fluid that was in the torque converter and in the lines it was a mix of the old with the new. I transferred the fluid slowly by starting the engine and slowly went through the usual P, R, N, D etc several seconds each before returning to P and stopping the engine. I got about 1-2qts pumped out each time this way and added this amount back into the transmission through the dipstick.



After several rounds of this I ended up with bright red fluid exiting the radiator.



I achieved this after using 7qts of WS with one to spare. The rest I poured back into the bottles to be disposed of locally in an environmentally sound way.

 

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What I need to figure out now is how to actually read the ATF dipstick.. it's very difficult. At first I stopped with the car clearly showed red on the cold mark while the engine was off and the car was on the level surface. I then drove it around for 10-15 minutes to get it hot and checked to see that the dipstick was at cold or barely showing. This really concerns me. I read some more and discovered you are supposed to be checking the ATF while the engine is hot and while it is running so I have done this and despite wiping the stick it still comes out shiny, I don't see any indication of a solid redness or line against the metal. I added my last quart of WS over several measurements today and still don't see much change at all. It looks as though one side will be shiny while the otherside has dryer patches and neither side is obvious at all.

I also am scared to overfill or ruin my transmission. Having said this, it drives really, really well now everything feels buttery. What should a dipstick look like with ATF on it? it's not at all like oil changes where it's obvious. I called my local dealership to see about a technician stepping outside to look with me but they were booked solid this afternoon and in turn they said you are never supposed to fill the transmission and wanted to know more information about what I had done and to leave it overnight so they could test it cold as well as hot. Clearly I'm not interested in spending hundreds on that.

Any ideas or can someone take a photo to show me (us) what this should be? Thanks all.
 

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.....snip....

I also am scared to overfill or ruin my transmission. Having said this, it drives really, really well now everything feels buttery. What should a dipstick look like with ATF on it? it's not at all like oil changes where it's obvious. I called my local dealership to see about a technician stepping outside to look with me but they were booked solid this afternoon and in turn they said you are never supposed to fill the transmission and wanted to know more information about what I had done and to leave it overnight so they could test it cold as well as hot. Clearly I'm not interested in spending hundreds on that.

Any ideas or can someone take a photo to show me (us) what this should be? Thanks all.
Shiny, hard to read dipstick is a common problem. What I do is sand the stick lightly with sandpaper or emory cloth just to cut the sheen. It's much easier to see the fluid level then.
DON'T put any more ATF in it until you can get a clear reading.
Drive the car as you did to warm it up.
Park on a level area, leave it in P, engine running.
Take several readings, making sure to push the stick all the way in each time.
 

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Shiny, hard to read dipstick is a common problem. What I do is sand the stick lightly with sandpaper or emory cloth just to cut the sheen. It's much easier to see the fluid level then.
DON'T put any more ATF in it until you can get a clear reading.
Drive the car as you did to warm it up.
Park on a level area, leave it in P, engine running.
Take several readings, making sure to push the stick all the way in each time.
I've got a fair amount of sandpaper in various grits, that's a worthwhile idea I will give it a shot. Thank you!

I can sand the side opposite side from the letters where there's no risk of scratching off the wording and see how it goes. The liquid is so d**n clear now that it's changed and the fluid itself runs thin so that you really can't see much even in direct summer sunshine.

The other option I have in the back of my mind is simply just to cut my loss on the fluid and drain it, then refill. I'll have to read back but I think the amount in the pan is known so I can always add that amount back in to be near par and go from there..
 

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I've got a fair amount of sandpaper in various grits, that's a worthwhile idea I will give it a shot. Thank you!

I can sand the side opposite side from the letters where there's no risk of scratching off the wording and see how it goes. The liquid is so d**n clear now that it's changed and the fluid itself runs thin so that you really can't see much even in direct summer sunshine.

The other option I have in the back of my mind is simply just to cut my loss on the fluid and drain it, then refill. I'll have to read back but I think the amount in the pan is known so I can always add that amount back in to be near par and go from there..
No need to sand hard, just enough to take the sheen off. Use a fine grade.
 

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I ended up using 320 grit and that did the job. It is an interesting idea and I'm glad you suggested it ravenuer, however it didn't work out in the end. On my ATF dipstick it is coated in a gunmetal grey color from the factory, the metal beneath this is a very shiny bright steel and the clearer color of the new WS in the transmission didn't provide much contrast if at all against this unless it was dripping off and concentrated red as opposed to just lightly coated and clear. It may help now that I have more or less sorted my issue out. It will probably also help down the road as the fluid goes darker.

I instead came up with the idea to use a white napkin wrapped around my finger to give me more contrast and visually see at what level the ATF is. After pulling the dipstick out level into the sunshine with the engine hot and running I could see where the fluid was by slowly dabbing down the dipstick starting at the hot mark working down to the cold mark. I just check the napkin between dabs until the napkin showed red/pink and took note of where this was. In my case, this confirmed one of my worst fears.. that there were very small amounts of ATF on the dipstick sides and sporadically between the hot and cold marks but for the most part it was dry (!) ie next to no fluid in the pan while driving around (or at least no fluid reading the filter as I remember seeing the twisted part of the dipstick being about level with the filter when I replaced it). But it has been driving really well since my fluid swap Sunday, noticeably better-buttery smooth, and I had originally filled it to the cold mark without the engine running and then later added another quart after I had driven around seeing how low it was.

What I gather is that the extra quart or so in the pan was being sucked into the transmission allowing me to drive ok but then leaving the pan without much fluid while operating. I took it very easy driving to one of my local Toyota dealers after I discovered this and bought 2 qts of WS to add in. I added 1/4 quarts at a time starting and stopping the engine between additions, as well as measuring and re-measuring the dipstick several times between these. It took 1 whole quart to see red on the twisted part of the dipstick with the engine hot, and fluid just about at the cold mark or so. It took another 1/4-1/3 quarts to get it to be halfway between that measurement and roughly two thirds way up to the hot mark. I decided to stop at this point and continue driving home to let things settle before I risk overfilling.

I just parked on a level surface a few minutes ago after driving and it still appears to be a little below the hot mark so it should be just fine now. I will check it again in the morning with the engine running and verify it's on the cold mark.

Funny thing is the dealership called me back today after doing some of their own Toyota research considering what I had told them I did and they said they would check and fill the transmission for $120 but they would still need the vehicle overnight. Hopefully now I am setup to go.
 

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I'm not sure about a fluid exchanger pump although I have watched videos of DIYers using them. I honestly found that disconnecting the ATF radiator return line (which is center-front right above the pan) and connecting a hose from it to a jug was easy enough to do without an additional pump and more stuff to watch out for.

If you aren't going to drop the transmission pan (and I don't blame anyone for not wanting to take that on) then letting the engine pump out the old ATF fluid is the next best thing without causing debris to kick up that a fluid exchanger pump might as you force new fluid back in to the system while it pumps out old under engine power.

Only pain of only using engine power is you have to be sure to shut off the ignition every few seconds or ~2qts at a time in order to pour that same amount of fresh ATF down the dipstick neck. Where having an exchanger pump hooked up could mean you have a gallon jug say of fresh WS ready for a seamless fluid exchange.
 

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Return Line Flush

Does anyone have instructions on how to do a full flush by removing the hose from the fluid exchanger pump?
The fluid comes from the transmission cooler return line to do the flush.

I have done it and I can give you the instructions:
- First do a normal drain and fill.
- Place the return line (need to make it longer with additional hose) into a clear large jug marked off 1 quart with a pan under it.
- Start car in park with hand brakes on and let the transmission fluid flow out into the bottle and stop car when you see it fill up 1 quart. (may take 1-2 minutes ?)
- Now pour 1 quart of new transmission fluid back into the transmission. (through dip stick hole using a long funnel)
- Repeat step 2 to 4. The flush takes 7 to 8 quarts.
- When finish put return line back on and check transmission fluid level.
In total I used a little over 12 quarts including the drain and fill.

Note: Here is a thread with pictures showing the return line location. Also the hose end come from the top is the one you should using since that is where the flow is coming from. The 4 and 6 cylinder engines are similar.
 

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The fluid comes from the transmission cooler return line to do the flush.

I have done it and I can give you the instructions:
- First do a normal drain and fill.
- Place the return line (need to make it longer with additional hose) into a clear large jug marked off 1 quart with a pan under it.
- Start car in park with hand brakes on and let the transmission fluid flow out into the bottle and stop car when you see it fill up 1 quart. (may take 1-2 minutes ?)
- Now pour 1 quart of new transmission fluid back into the transmission. (through dip stick hole using a long funnel)
- Repeat step 2 to 4. The flush takes 7 to 8 quarts.
- When finish put return line back on and check transmission fluid level.
In total I used a little over 12 quarts including the drain and fill.

Note: Here is a thread with pictures showing the return line location. Also the hose end come from the top is the one you should using since that is where the flow is coming from. The 4 and 6 cylinder engines are similar.


THANKS A TON! This is exactly what I was looking for. Do you have any opinions on fluid to use?
 
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