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Discussion Starter #1
So on the weekend, I brought my vehicle into the dealer to have a few recalls done. During their inspection, they noticed the oil pan was "weeping". I finally got a chance to crawl underneath to see what they were talking about.

So yes, it definitely is "weeping"...well I'd describe it more like condensation but very slight. Just enough to coat the exterior of the pan. There is no oil leaking out of the drain bolt. I do all my own oil changes.

I did notice a bolt on the passenger side, on the block...had some oil residue on it. Not sure where that leads to. If anyone can shed some light on it, I'd appreciate it. Again, the "leak" there is very minor. I have not noticed any oil consumption.

I suppose next oil change, I can just drop the pan and clean it out. Then install with a new gasket. The bolt that has the residue...I'm more curious about that and is it something that I can fix myself (kinda looks like it).
 

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That's a Banjo fitting. Perhaps you can check to see if it is torqued to specs, if not, tighten. If so then there might be a copper washer that needs replacing.
 

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There is a big thread discussing about a defective oil cooler line affecting some earlier models. The rubber hose may have a pin hole running oil down the bolt. The remedy was to replace it with a newer part which is all steel.

Since you brought your car to the dealer they should inform you if that was the problem or what was the cause of the leak. If you indeed have the rubber oil cooler line you should replace it anyways just so nothing burst. Some owners needed to replace the engine when the oil cooler line leak since it gave no warning.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's a Banjo fitting. Perhaps you can check to see if it is torqued to specs, if not, tighten. If so then there might be a copper washer that needs replacing.
Will do! The oil is concentrated around the bolt and doesn't seem to be flowing from above or anywhere else.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
There is a big thread discussing about a defective oil cooler line affecting some earlier models. The rubber hose may have a pin hole running oil down the bolt. The remedy was to replace it with a newer part which is all steel.

Since you brought your car to the dealer they should inform you if that was the problem or what was the cause of the leak. If you indeed have the rubber oil cooler line you should replace it anyways just so nothing burst. Some owners needed to replace the engine when the oil cooler line leak since it gave no warning.

Mine is a steel line. I would have noticed the oil and levels if there was a leak as I check my engine bay top and bottom quite regularly. More thoroughly when I do my oil changes. I gave it a quick wipe and will crawl under again when I go to confirm torque tightness. I'd be happy if it was just a copper washer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
DL125, I must have been on another planet. Retraced the oil hose...it is indeed partially rubber. I also looked back at my service history. The rubber hose was replaced very early on with another rubber hose. I had a good look and prod at it just a moment ago. No visible oil leaks that I can see but then again if it is just a very slow leak from a pin hole...going to be hard to track down. The rubber was soft and looked to be in good condition. Anyways, the good news is the leak is still slow...looks to be anyways. I had a look at the banjo bolt at the bottom again after I had cleaned it, not much on there.

I called the dealership and they have the part so I have it on order. It should be here by tomorrow so will go pick it up after work.

For reference in case anyone is looking for it and didn't want to sift through the massive post on the oil line.

Part number: 15772-31030 ($57.95)
Upper gasket: 90430-16012 ($2.95)
Lower gasket: 90430-16016 ($1.95)

Prices are in Canadian dollars. I ordered through Langley Toyota. Just leaving it out in case there are some local members wondering about cost.

Now the parts person stated even though it is for the same engine, the part number is coming up for an Avalon (which I already knew) so she could not guarantee that it will fit. The one for the Rav4 still has the rubber fitting on there. To me, it does not make sense to have that line in 3 pieces when you can get it as a one piece. And the price...yeah it was a bit outrageous. $197!!! I suppose I'll find out quickly if this accounts for the "weeping" of the oil pan.
 

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Pretty sure the oil line was all steel for RAV4s built after April 2008.
But the replacement on the recall as another "improved" steel/rubber line. Makes no sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
yeah my improved line was the rubber part. My dad did the update way back when it was first discovered. It was the only part available to them.

funny enough the old part number is still in the system. But for a mere $200 bucks you can have one vs the all steel for $60. Yeah that doesn't make any sense at all. The part is suppose to be in today so we'll see. At least now i have an excuse to get a super long extension for the socket to reach the lower banjo bolt! New tool additions are always a plus! I'll likely have to wait until tomorrow morning for everything to cool down before getting to it.
 

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Replaced oil line

So I thought to myself...weeping oil pan. Yeah, I guess it could be possible but then again, if it is "weeping" as they say, I'd have more oil loss. After jacking the vehicle up, wow...talk about an oil spray party!! It's all over the place!!!

I picked up the part from Langley Toyota. Got the washers, and the all steel oil line. The new line went in without a hitch. I'll post up on the main thread for others in a bit with my findings and experience. I'll post them here as well in case anyone is wondering about doing this. I would refer to the posted pictures and instructions on page 14 of the quality problem with v6 thread.

Get an old tupperware container or some container to hold the bolts and for cleaning parts. Helps to keep things in one place so you don't loose it.

http://www.rav4world.com/forums/96-4-3-general/74583-quality-problem-v6-engine-rav4-camry-lexus-oil-hose-failing-14.html

1. Turn the wheel to the left (this will give you some room to work with on the lower banjo bolt)

2. Loosen the wheel lugs

3. Jack the car up and use jack stands.

4. Remove wheel lugs and set tire aside.

5. Remove the plastic splash shield. This will give you access to the side bolts of the VVTI line shield. I found it easier to access it from below then to get it from above. There are 3 of those dreaded pop out plastic things. Easy to remove and once off you can just remove the plastic piece. Set that aside once you have it removed.

6. Remove the VVTI line shield (10mm bolts, there are 2 of them). I accessed this from the bottom vs the top. I had use a socket for loosening the bolt closest to the engine. The other bolt I ended up using a wrench to get at. My socket and wrench did not fit in there...another spot where a box wrench would have made life easier. But nonetheless, made do with what I had to get the job done. These aren't that tight on there so they are easy to break free. You may wrestle with the plastic piece to get it out of the engine compartment. I found it easiest to move it so it fell out of the bottom.

7. Place some rags or blue shop towels under the banjo bolts to catch the oil that will spill out. Alternatively, if you have those oil absorbing towels, use those. The lower banjo bolt will release a bit of oil once loosened.

8. Remove the top banjo bolt from the oil line. If you have AC, remove the bolt on the bracket that is holding it. You will be able to fit a larger torque wrench back there if you do. Otherwise, fitting even a regular socket and ratchet in there will be next to impossible. If you have a box wrench, that would help out. Be aware that the bolt is damn tight on there. I ended up using my 1/2" torque wrench to break it free.

9. Remove the VVTI line bracket as per RPM's instructions. It's the middle bolt. Comes off fairly easy and I accessed it from underneath.

10. Clean the banjo bolt and the filter. Don't loose the filter. I cleaned the filter with brake cleaner. I couldn't seen anything in the filter, looked to be free of debris so all good there. I also cleaned up the bolt. Remove the old crush washers. Install ONE of the washers onto the bolt. You'll install the other one once you are ready to install the new line.

11. Loosen the lower banjo bolt. I used an extension socket and my torque wrench to break this free as well. A shorter wrench is quite difficult in that spot as it is already a bit tight. This is the reason why I moved turned the wheel to the left. It allowed a bit more clearance and leeway to get some good leverage. The bolt broke free! And when it did, the oil started flowing, which is why it is important to lay the towels and rags down first. Remove the bolt and clean it up with brake cleaner. Set that aside.

12. Remove the VVTI line, I just moved it off to the side (towards passenger side) and it came out no problem!

13. Clean off the banjo bolt holes by wiping it.

14. Install the new VVTI line as per RPM's instructions but leave the bottom washer until later. I found it easier to install the washer after the top was secured. Put in the bolt and the remaining washer. Hand tighten it but loosely.

15. Go to the bottom banjo bolt and note how the old washer was installed. Install it the same way. The line can be moved a bit to make room for the washer to slide in. Put in the bolt and hand tighten.

16. Reinstall the VVTI line bracket. The black tab is moveable so if it is not in the right spot, you can slide it along or rotate to get it to line up. Hand tighten and then snug up with your socket.

17. Set your torque wrench to 48ft lbs as per RPM's instructions. Tighten to specs.

18. Reinstall the VVTI line cover.

19. Do not reinstall your wheel at this point. Clear your engine bay of your tools.

20. Start your vehicle and run it for a couple of minutes. The line will sorta "burb" as it primes itself with oil. Now at this point, just have a look underneath and at the top to ensure there are no oil leaks. If you don't see any, turn the vehicle off.

21. Reinstall the nut you removed from the AC line anchors.

22. Reinstall the plastic wheel well shield.

23. Put the tires back on and tighten the lugs.

24. Lower the vehicle and torque the lugs to specs.

25. Replace the engine cover.

26. Go for a test drive around the block and then check the banjo bolts for leaks again. If no leaks, you're all good.
 
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