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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there,
i know that in the manual is 33 PSI, on the car door says 33PSI, but today when i checked my tires pressure , all my tires got 38PSI. I purchased the car (RAV4 LE 2015) three months ago, and today was the first time when i checked the pressure. What pressure supposed to be?

Thank you for your help
 

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Welcome! Tires are inflated at the assembly plant in Ontario to 40 psi for shipping. In my case they ware at 50 psi. Dealers are supposed to check tire pressures but often don't. First thing after I got the RAV home and after the tires had cooled was to check the pressure. Suggest that tires and tire pressure be checked more often than every three months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for your quick replay, then the pressure supposed to be 33 ? Or is better to leave it at 38 like i found it?
 

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The tires pressure will vary according to the season ( ambient temperature ) and recent driving. It is best to check the pressure in the morning before you drive the car ( cold pressure ). This should be set to 33 PSI. You should check it at least monthly and adjust as necessary. A warm summer morning at 33 PSI will be several pounds less on a normal 30 degree morning in the winter.
 

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http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=147 :wink


Tire Tech

Air Pressure: When & How to Set

(Lea en español)
"Check and adjust first thing in the morning...before rising ambient temperatures, the sun's radiant heat or even driving short distances temporarily warms the tires."
Maintenance Tips to Increase Tire Performance, Life and Durability

Check and Adjust First Thing In The Morning. Set according to the vehicle manufacturer's cold tire pressure(s) recommended on the vehicle's tire placard or in its owner's manual. This must be done before rising ambient temperatures, the sun's radiant heat or even driving short distances temporarily warms the tires.
Accommodating Variables

Indoor-to-outdoor Temperature Variation. Significant differences between the conditions tire pressures are set (the warmth of an attached garage, heated garage or service shop) and in which the vehicle will be driven (winter's subfreezing temperatures) requires inflating tires 1 psi higher than recommended on the placard for every 10° F difference in temperature between interior and exterior temperatures.
Afternoon Ambient Temperature Increase.* Set 2 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations when installing new tires or if the vehicle has been parked in the shade for a few hours.
Tire Heat Generated While Being Driven (or at speeds of less than 45 mph).* Set 4 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations.
Heat Generated While Being Driven Extensively (or at sustained speeds greater than 45 mph).* Set 6 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations.
Do Not Release Hot Tire Pressure if any of these variables could be the cause of measured tire pressure exceeding the maximum psi branded on the tire's sidewall by the 2, 4 or 6 psi indicated above for the various conditions. This temporary pressure increase is expected and designed into the tire's capabilities.
Note: Tires on a parked vehicle exposed to direct sunlight will appear overinflated due to the heat absorbed from the radiant energy of the sun. Pressures cannot be accurately set on these tires until all have stabilized in the shade.
 

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Yeah, think of 33 PSI as a target. In the summer, set it there. When winter comes, if facing overnight parking in cold weather, set it higher (38 pounds would be okay) to account for less pressure as it gets colder. Tom Brady discovered this, unbeknownst to him, as his footballs lost some poundage during a cold snap.
 

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Sure wish our RAV4's had the tire pressure display activated. Almost a safety issue, as it is much easier to frequently check the pressures via a dash display. We call up the tire pressures on our 2012 Camry every time we head out of town. Even wife uses it, to her knowing the tire pressures are good is like having a full tank of gas.
 

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Hi there,
i know that in the manual is 33 PSI, on the car door says 33PSI, but today when i checked my tires pressure , all my tires got 38PSI. I purchased the car (RAV4 LE 2015) three months ago, and today was the first time when i checked the pressure. What pressure supposed to be?

Thank you for your help
Did you check them cold or after driving??? It makes a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah, think of 33 PSI as a target. In the summer, set it there. When winter comes, if facing overnight parking in cold weather, set it higher (38 pounds would be okay) to account for less pressure as it gets colder. Tom Brady discovered this, unbeknownst to him, as his footballs lost some poundage during a cold snap.
lol...you can say wherever you like, but do not touch my quarterback :)) FREE TOM BRADY!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Did you check them cold or after driving??? It makes a difference.
I checked them after 7 miles driving , the psi was around 38 like i said, outside temp was around 70F
 

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lol...you can say wherever you like, but do not touch my quarterback :)) FREE TOM BRADY!!!

No, really, it is a consideration--an inflated object tire or football will lose some pressure when going from warm to cold.

And you really have to watch it after a dealer service. My RAV was in for warranty work and dealer shop inflated to 40-pounds! This was in early, mild September, and service writer says we have to inflate for possible winter weather!! Wha?? 40-lbs makes for a harsh ride!

So went home and adjusted down. Usually roll with 34-lbs, measured cold. When REAL winter gets here, might pump it up to 38 if going to sit out overnight in the super cold. But never when it's mild weather.

Yeah, and I support FREE BRADY. Overblown deal, so to speak, lol. He paid his 'humiliation' fine already, IMO.
 

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Accurate pressure checks are done before driving when tires are cold, hence the cold pressure spec.




http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=147 :wink


Tire Tech

Air Pressure: When & How to Set

(Lea en español)
"Check and adjust first thing in the morning...before rising ambient temperatures, the sun's radiant heat or even driving short distances temporarily warms the tires."
Maintenance Tips to Increase Tire Performance, Life and Durability

Check and Adjust First Thing In The Morning. Set according to the vehicle manufacturer's cold tire pressure(s) recommended on the vehicle's tire placard or in its owner's manual. This must be done before rising ambient temperatures, the sun's radiant heat or even driving short distances temporarily warms the tires.
Accommodating Variables

Indoor-to-outdoor Temperature Variation. Significant differences between the conditions tire pressures are set (the warmth of an attached garage, heated garage or service shop) and in which the vehicle will be driven (winter's subfreezing temperatures) requires inflating tires 1 psi higher than recommended on the placard for every 10° F difference in temperature between interior and exterior temperatures.
Afternoon Ambient Temperature Increase.* Set 2 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations when installing new tires or if the vehicle has been parked in the shade for a few hours.
Tire Heat Generated While Being Driven (or at speeds of less than 45 mph).* Set 4 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations.
Heat Generated While Being Driven Extensively (or at sustained speeds greater than 45 mph).* Set 6 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations.
Do Not Release Hot Tire Pressure if any of these variables could be the cause of measured tire pressure exceeding the maximum psi branded on the tire's sidewall by the 2, 4 or 6 psi indicated above for the various conditions. This temporary pressure increase is expected and designed into the tire's capabilities.
Note: Tires on a parked vehicle exposed to direct sunlight will appear overinflated due to the heat absorbed from the radiant energy of the sun. Pressures cannot be accurately set on these tires until all have stabilized in the shade.
 

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The "Check and Adjust First thing In the Morning" entry in Quickdtoo's post is important. Even after sitting in our garage for several hours after a run the heat from the V6 engine in my RAV is still enough to throw off the tire pressure readings with the front tires, especially the right hand one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
No, really, it is a consideration--an inflated object tire or football will lose some pressure when going from warm to cold.

And you really have to watch it after a dealer service. My RAV was in for warranty work and dealer shop inflated to 40-pounds! This was in early, mild September, and service writer says we have to inflate for possible winter weather!! Wha?? 40-lbs makes for a harsh ride!

So went home and adjusted down. Usually roll with 34-lbs, measured cold. When REAL winter gets here, might pump it up to 38 if going to sit out overnight in the super cold. But never when it's mild weather.

Yeah, and I support FREE BRADY. Overblown deal, so to speak, lol. He paid his 'humiliation' fine already, IMO.
I totally agree with you about the pressure (and specially about Tom Brady!:)), but what i want to find out is why the dealer is inflating the tiers around 40psi (specially in summer time) when the manufacturer required only 33psi. Can damage the suspension on the long run and is not that comfortable for the passengers. At the end of the month i have my first inspection with the dealer, then i will ask there anyway. Thank you for your help.
 

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... i want to find out is why the dealer is inflating the tiers around 40psi (specially in summer time) when the manufacturer required only 33psi. Can damage the suspension on the long run and is not that comfortable for the passengers. At the end of the month i have my first inspection with the dealer, then i will ask there anyway...

I think it is the internal policy to prevent under-inflation in the winter. I believe they put a TSB out on it. To me it translates to laziness in the shop, as it is absurd to do it when weather if fair.

When I went in, they had no idea how far I had driven (warm tires?) or if I ever park overnight in the extreme cold. Just jacked it up to 40. They did at least notate it on the their service check sheet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
... i want to find out is why the dealer is inflating the tiers around 40psi (specially in summer time) when the manufacturer required only 33psi. Can damage the suspension on the long run and is not that comfortable for the passengers. At the end of the month i have my first inspection with the dealer, then i will ask there anyway...

I think it is the internal policy to prevent under-inflation in the winter. I believe they put a TSB out on it. To me it translates to laziness in the shop, as it is absurd to do it when weather if fair.

When I went in, they had no idea how far I had driven (warm tires?) or if I ever park overnight in the extreme cold. Just jacked it up to 40. They did at least notate it on the their service check sheet.
I will ask them if they will do it...but i bet they will give me an elusive answer or they will come up with something to "impress me ":))
 

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but what i want to find out is why the dealer is inflating the tiers around 40psi (specially in summer time) when the manufacturer required only 33psi. Can damage the suspension on the long run and is not that comfortable for the passengers.
You might be worrying about this a little more than needed. You said you measured your tires at 38 PSI after driving 7 miles in 70F temperature. You really need to understand Quickdoo's post #12. In particular the parts highlighted in red.

If I had inflated my tires to 33 PSI in the winter when temperatures were 0F, it would not be unusual to find the pressure over 40 PSI on a 70F day. Since you don't know what the "cold tire temperature" was when they were filled, you can't really say that it was done wrong.

You also didn't say if you purchased the RAV new or used. I understand that tires are inflated to higher than normal pressures at the factory to help seat the bead of the tires and avoid flat spots during shipping and storage. The dealer is suppose to correct the pressure during PDI , but that is often overlooked.

The other thing you need to know is that the tire can safely be inflated to the maximum pressure listed on the sidewall. This is almost always over 45 PSI. The 33 PSI on the RAV's door frame has been selected to be soft enough to provide a smooth ride, and yet hard enough to provide good handling and vehicle control as well a fuel economy. Many drivers will experiment with the pressure to better suit their own comfort vs performance requirements.

So the 38 PSI that you measured is not dangerous, it will not damage your vehicle, and may be completely normal without knowing the answers to some of the variables I listed. If you take the time to understand post #12 I think you will better understand what is happening.

And finally, you will never be able to change the habits of mechanics. It is up to you to check your own tire pressures, and more frequently than you have been because pressures will change from season to season, and even more quickly if you pick up a nail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You might be worrying about this a little more than needed. You said you measured your tires at 38 PSI after driving 7 miles in 70F temperature. You really need to understand Quickdoo's post #12. In particular the parts highlighted in red.

If I had inflated my tires to 33 PSI in the winter when temperatures were 0F, it would not be unusual to find the pressure over 40 PSI on a 70F day. Since you don't know what the "cold tire temperature" was when they were filled, you can't really say that it was done wrong.

You also didn't say if you purchased the RAV new or used. I understand that tires are inflated to higher than normal pressures at the factory to help seat the bead of the tires and avoid flat spots during shipping and storage. The dealer is suppose to correct the pressure during PDI , but that is often overlooked.

The other thing you need to know is that the tire can safely be inflated to the maximum pressure listed on the sidewall. This is almost always over 45 PSI. The 33 PSI on the RAV's door frame has been selected to be soft enough to provide a smooth ride, and yet hard enough to provide good handling and vehicle control as well a fuel economy. Many drivers will experiment with the pressure to better suit their own comfort vs performance requirements.

So the 38 PSI that you measured is not dangerous, it will not damage your vehicle, and may be completely normal without knowing the answers to some of the variables I listed. If you take the time to understand post #12 I think you will better understand what is happening.

And finally, you will never be able to change the habits of mechanics. It is up to you to check your own tire pressures, and more frequently than you have been because pressures will change from season to season, and even more quickly if you pick up a nail.
hi there, thank you for your help. I do understand what you explain to me. The car is brand new, and came from the dealer with this pressure, i do not know how much pressure the tires got when i purchased the car. I just checked the pressure few days ago and i was surprise to find out that the tires was more pressure supposed to be, in my opinion . Like i said it is not a big deal, was just a surprise and i was wonder why is more then 33psi. Thank again
 

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Think of the tire pressure mounted on the door placard or glovebox as minimum tire pressure you want to be running to ensure safe operation of the vehicle. This should be a good starting point to set your tire pressures, but you'll likely find that the "correct" tire pressure could be significantly different than the OEM recommended one - all depending on the driving conditions, ambient temperatures, and the tire itself.


As for why the tire pressure is off (higher) - as mentioned, possible that the dealership didn't verify tire pressures coming off the delivery trailer or possible the tech used a pressure gauge that was messed up / didn't look carefully enough at the dial.


That said - I wouldn't worry too much about that. 40PSI, IMO, is not an excessive amount of pressure for that tire.


If the ride seem too aggressive, too stiff - go ahead and bleed them down a bit. Myself, since I drive primarily on the highway - I tend to plump my tires up a bit higher than most other drivers. What is the limiting factor is the tire pressure stamped on the tire itself. That is the MAX cold tire inflation that is recommend by the "tire" manufacturer. This is different than what the "vehicle" manufacturer will recommend, that's OK - what you'll likely find is the optimal tire pressure is somewhere in between.


Myself, I run Bridgestone Ecopia EP422 tires on my Rav4. If run at the OEM recommended tire pressures, the tread tend to rollover too easily, have excessive movement - inner and outer edges of the tire also are excessively hot (measured with a contact tire pyrometer). MAX cold tire pressure stamped is 44PSI - so I tend to run them between 40 and 41 PSI - there the tread temps are flat across the face of the tread and the ride quality is not obnoxiously harsh, braking is solid and initial turn-in is sharp. For my driving conditions, my particular vehicle, and how I drive it - that is the "correct" tire pressure for me. To find yours, you'll have to do some experimenting.
 

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My dealer recommends and inflates tires on my '11 Base RAV to 40 psi. Makes the ride a little more sporty, may increase fuel mileage somewhat, and certainly helps handling on our twisty mountain roads. I take curves easily while many others screech around them, or take them at a speed like molasses supposedly flows in winter in the Arctic.
 
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