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Those are the 17" direct fit steel wheels from 1010tires (Downsized for more rubber for winter). The tires are Toyo Observer G3s that have been studded.
 

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Michelin Latitude x-ICe X12 has given me good results, good mpg (eco tire) and unlike many winter tires, has a long lasting treadwear. Tire rack gives it high marks.
Agreed. They've been terrific. And they're good on cold dry pavement too. They're the only winter tire I saw with a treadware warranty.
 

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Danno001,

I see your point...I guess I've been lucky with the all season tires that came with my AWD/4WD vehicles.
For many years I commuted approx. 30,000 miles a year in mixed highway and back road situations, which included snow covered roads. I think the "snow capabilities" of the vehicles I owned also played a big part in my trouble free snow driving.
Winter tires are not just about snow and inclement weather. Their winter compounds remain supple in low temperatures, while all seasons get hard as rocks, so the winter compounds provides better grip in all conditions, even dry roads.
 

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Here's a post on the Exterior forum of my winter setup: https://www.rav4world.com/threads/pictures-of-your-aftermarket-wheels.301481/post-2743488

Regarding having 2 sets of wheels, the car does store the TPM IDs for another set of tires so changing back and forth is easy (or buy a cheap scan device).
You would never use the same wheels and remove/swap tires and re-balance. That's crazy and what some people did 40 years ago.
I don’t know if it’s crazy, but if you’re keeping the vehicle for 5+ years, another set of wheels probably makes sense.
 

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I don’t know if it’s crazy, but if you’re keeping the vehicle for 5+ years, another set of wheels probably makes sense.
Exactly. Keep for vehicle and buy the extra set of wheels and tires for winter. That's not crazy. It's basically insurance IMHO. If you amortized over 5 to 10 years it makes sense.

What I was suggesting as 'crazy' is to have 2 sets of tires but only one set of rims... then twice a year: pull the tires off the rims, re-balance and then install the other set of tires.. that's expensive and hard on the tires as well.
 

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I agree with the suggestion of having dedicated tires AND wheels. I bought Firestone Winterforces and Toyota steel wheels for our 2008. Kept using them on the 2013 and last winter (their 10th season) they were in use on the 2017. Of course, they were hard as rocks by then, but still had useable tread remaining. I ended up putting new Goodyear winter tires on those same wheels and will have them installed on the 2020 this week prior to delivery.

Always store your wheels & tires inside when not on the car as exposure to the sun increases checking (small cracks in the tire's sidewall and/or tread).
 

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I live in the snowiest metropolitan city in the United States 150 inches of snow last winter. This is my recommendation because you can also use these tires in the summer which is very unusual. These tires are rated for severe snow use with the mountain snowflake just like a dedicated snow tire
Goodyear assurance weather ready tire (Mountain snowflake). You can run this all year long and have a real winter tire. I think it even comes with a 60,000 mile warranty. This is the tire I use personally with a 2017 RAV4 all-wheel-drive hybrid.
I bought a set of those for a Prius I had. While they are better than an ‘all season’; they still aren’t quite as good as a true winter tire. For someone who can’t afford two sets of tires, or absolutely don’t want to deal with the hassle of switching tires they are a nice option.
When I was shopping for all weather tires, the guy in the service department tried to argue with me that all season and all weather tires were the same thing. They are NOT!!! It’s really sad that people that SHOULD know the difference; don’t have a clue. Yet, he talked to me like I was an idiot.
They were better tires than the all seasons, for sure. They got me through the last winter ok. I was able to trade in my car and no one said anything about the tires being mud and snow rated. They had no idea and just assumed they were all season. Fine by me!

This year for my RAV4 hybrid I bought a set of Bridgestone Blizzak DM-V2s. They turn the Rav into a snow beast. Proof that tires really can transform the way a car performs. No need for Subaru symmetrical full time AWD unless you truly go off road. The majority of these grocery getter SUVs never ever do. For that, I say; buy a true truck.
 
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