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as a woman buyer what are the key points I should do in talking to a salesman. I have been discussing a 2006 rav4 with a dealer in Arlington TX as this is where Costco had referred me to. With some of the options I want it looks as if I may be trying to get a limited. (Did not really want to spend any more than I had to but...) I will probably trade my 2001 rav4 L in. Any input??? :p

Thanks you are great with all the info on this site.
 

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mama2mrs said:
as a woman buyer what are the key points I should do in talking to a salesman. I have been discussing a 2006 RAV4 with a dealer in Arlington TX as this is where Costco had referred me to. With some of the options I want it looks as if I may be trying to get a limited. (Did not really want to spend any more than I had to but...) I will probably trade my 2001 RAV4 L in. Any input??? :p

Thanks you are great with all the info on this site.
If you haven't gone to edmunds.com yet, I recommend starting there and reading some of the tips on buying a new car. Costco's website also has some tips. One thing to remember is that when negotiating, a trade-in may affect the price of the new car.

Do more research on other things that could affect your overall cost: financing options, options/accessories, trade-in value for your car, what other dealers in your area are selling RAVs for, fees for your area, just to name a few.

Don't know what all the fees beyond destination, tax, and license fees there are in TX but know this going in. I know some areas tack on ads and tire fees.

BTW, although it's Costco's policy to only refer to one dealer, if you're getting a hard time from the one they referred you to, call Costco and talk to them. They will work with you.

Good luck and hope you get the model you want!
 

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For most people, vehicles are the second-largest investment (a house being the first) that they will ever make. Therefore you want to put a lot of thought (and often a lot of negotiation) into the purchase.

In general, salesmen will try to push safety features when talking to women, and performance features when talking to men. The best advice is to know exactly what you want before you even enter the dealership, and never let the salesperson know that you are seriously interested in a specific vehicle. Salespeople will always try to make you think that a deal is "for today only" and that you will lose it as soon as you walk out the door. This is rarely ever true, unless another customer finalizes the deal before you do.

There are a few key points to keep in mind when car shopping that my dad taught me many years ago, and have yet to fail:

1. Buying a car is all about who has the best poker face. No matter what the dealer says, you can always bargain over the price. "No-haggle pricing" is for suckers. While "no-haggle pricing" may be more simple (and theoretically non-negotiable), there is always a little room for negotiation with respect to other "fees", such as those related to delivery or financing charges.

2. The "dealer invoice" price is always more than it actually is, because most manufacturers give dealers a discount on invoice depending on their sales volume. Whereas "retail" or "sticker" price is a suggested price, "dealer invoice" is also not set in stone.

1. Always act like you are going to pay for the vehicle in cash, on-the-spot, even though you will end up financing it. The car dealers make more money with financing, so they will try to get you to finance instead of paying for it up front, and will usually offer you a pretty good rate.

2. ALWAYS, I MEAN ALWAYS, be ready to walk out of the dealership at the drop of a hat, even if you plan on buying a car and you know exactly what you are looking for (options, features, pricing, etc). The objective is not to go into the dealership and let them know you have a specific vehicle in mind, because then you put the ball in their court and you lose the advantage.

3. The objective is to act like you just came in to look around and see what is available. You never really want to take the first offer, because the salesperson will usually start high and work their way down as needed. If they give you a "final offer" and it is still a little high, make sure you haven given them your phone number before you walk out the door, because they will most likely call you in a day or two with a better offer.

4. Skip the dealer-installed options; this is where they try to squeeze more money out of you. Everything that the dealer offers can be found online or on e-bay for much less. Also, skip any extra "prep options" such as washing, waxing, undercoating, sealing, etc. because it's a waste of money. You can always have it done after the fact.

Buying a car is a gamble in general, because you could get exactly what you want at the beginning of the model year, but you will most likely pay a premium for it. However, you can wait until the end of the model year and get a discount, but you may not be able to get exactly what you wanted.
 

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what do you consider a good price at this point of time? Based on my experience, local dealership will be willing to match others price and possibly $50 - $100 below. When are you going to stop shopping? We're shopping for a $20,000 item, paying a $100 over others is not a bad deal at all. Currently, I'm settled with close to invoice at this point of time with options that I wanted only.
 

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to be honest I don't know why most people are so fixated on how much $$ they save on a $26k vehicle. I mean how much are you really saving over the life of it if your paying $500 less then the next guy?? Just about nothing.. For me.. the MOST important thing is after the sale service and how we were treated during the shopping experience.. We found a local Toyota dealer that treated us well and has a good rep for after the sale service, walked in told then we want this exact truck, had this downpayment and wanted to pay this as a monthly payment. Can you complete this deal? Yes? sold.
Hows the old saying go??

"The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of "low price"
is long forgotten"

This is so true..
 

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I have a biased opinion of car dealers because I was born and raised in lower New York where the local car dealers would take you for all you're worth if they had the chance.
 

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I just ordered one for $300 over invoice. The salesperson wanted to renegotiate the price after I disputed the presented total. I was thinking to accept his negotiation and walk out the dealership. In my mind, if he wants my business back, he would have to call me and complete the transaction over the phone. But I didn't walk out and instead have him show me exactly how he got that price. At the end, it was a calculation error (intentionally or not???). Good thing I've computed the total before going to the dealership. If you want to deal with my dealership, I would suggest you deal with the first salesperson. He is off today and have his associate to deal with me. I'm sure they could do better than $300 over invoice but when do I stop finding the next best price. :)
 
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